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Conor Backman’s The Other Real At Nudashank

New York based Conor Backman recently opened a solo exhibition entitled The Other Real at Nudashank in Baltimore. From the press release: “Backman’s work conflates and oscillates between sculpture and painting, authentic and simulation, material and image, ironic and actual. For this exhibition Backman will present pieces informed by visual illustrations of otherness, physicality, mimesis, and deception in classical mythology and allegory. Specifically, examples that have been sited or recontextualized in modern psychology and philosophy as metaphors for the unconscious, perception, desire, and understanding.” The show in on view through April 28th, 2013.

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Mind Bending Video Uses Projection Mapping And Large Robotics

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The engineering and design studio Bot & Dolly created the video Box.  In it a simple flat surface is visually transformed in unbelievable ways.  Projection mapping has been especially popular lately because of its extreme versatility among other things.  For projection mapping a computer basically maps a surface, one often considered too irregular for traditional projection.  The software’s images are then projected on precise locations on the surface.  In this way projects can appear to interact with the surface or produce the illusion of depth.  For the video Bot & Dolly seem to push the potential of projection mapping.  Flat surfaces are attached to large robotics, thus the projection not only interacts with the nontraditional surface but also its movement.  It does this so effectively that at times its difficult to remember the surface is indeed flat.  Amazingly, all of the effects are in camera – that is, no special effects were applied after recording.  After watching the video, its interesting to think about the potential use of such technology.  Bot & Dolly go on to speak about the project saying:

Box explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping on moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. Bot & Dolly produced this work to serve as both an artistic statement and technical demonstration. It is the culmination of multiple technologies, including large scale robotics, projection mapping, and software engineering. We believe this methodology has tremendous potential to radically transform theatrical presentations, and define new genres of expression.”

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Juka Araikawa

 

I first met Juka Araikawa during my stint at UCLA as a teachers assistant for a drawing class. She was a quiet  girl who had moved across the world to LA to study art. Even though she didn’t say much her work always stood out as some of my favorite in the class.

 

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Eliot Lee Hazel

Eliot Lee Hazel may be an LA based photographer but his photographs subjects look like the inhabitants of an artist colony on mars. Think Silverlake but in space.

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Jesse Draxler

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Just found Jesse Draxler’s pics on the B/D Creative Pic Pool. Every now and again I like to check out what our readers got goin’ on. The premise of these images is super simple: vintage photo + black face paint + colored background. But the result kind of looks like funky super hero trading cards that you wish you found at a flea market!

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Leah Rosenberg’s Stacks Of Dried Paint

Leah Rosenberg lives and works in San Francisco. Using layer upon layer of dried acrylic paint she creates colorful monuments that blur the line between painting and sculpture. These luscious slabs appear to be wet, ready to curl and swirl at any moment. In her own words these “…bodies of work combine systems of accumulation and elements of layering to explore how our experiences, emotions, and memories build up over time.”

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Sac Magique’s Got Grit

I’m loving Sac Magique’s gritty and textured illustrations. The toxic avenger above is particularly nice.

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Tomo Tanaka’s Tiny Food Becomes A Feast For Your Eyes

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As a kid I collected miniatures. I would go away with my parents and wherever we traveled there seemed to be a store that sold tiny objects. Back then they were mostly for dollhouses but I acquired these curiosities so I could display them on my desk. I thought it was cool that someone could actually make something that small. I remember some of the items in my collection included miniature coca cola bottles, tiny animals (mainly cats) and food such as jelly apples and cakes.

With a similar thought in mind Japanese artist Tomo Tanaka creates high-end miniatures.  Using clay and epoxy he constructs tiny masterpieces of mostly Parisian cuisine displaying the utmost detail. Tanaka’s creations are so mini that for documentation purposes he photographs them on his fingertips to give the viewer an idea of size. This however does not infringe on the detail involved. It’s remarkable that at such small scale they are painfully and accurately crafted to the tiniest fold and extremely appetizing. He presents a collection of eatables and household products under the moniker Nunu’s house. Within that framework he creates food spreads which would make any caterer proud in the realistic way they are rendered and displayed.
Tanaka is unique because he excels at a definitive craft which overflows into the area of fine art. He has published two books and teaches courses on the subject. (via spoon-tamago)
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