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Studio Visit: David Ball’s Fantastic Fantasy Worlds

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David Ball creates the kind of art you need to see in person, so you can get right up close to every piece and fully immerse yourself into the fine details of his fantastic fantasy worlds. I’m forever in awe of his mixed-media collages and I’m always trying to figure out how he makes all his works look like paintings, even though I thoroughly know that they’re assembled from thousands of magazine clippings. At least some of the photos below by Shaun Roberts give a rare glimpse into David’s unique and beautiful process, that makes my brain simply explode with joy. And right now, I’m just super jealous of every art fiend living San Francisco, since David will be featured in the group exhibit “Harum Scarum” at 111 Minna Gallery that opens on February 2nd and runs until February 25th.

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So Unreal

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New video by Jon Clark and Spencer Longo for Los Angeles band LA Vampires’ (in collab with Matrix Metals) catchy number “So Unreal” combines all the things I love most about 80s/90s video aesthetics: head wraps, odd mystic paraphernalia, soft glows, and of course a healthy helping of neon. Jon and Spencer sacrificed their living room to set up this dark lair for a whole month! Spencer Longo currently has an installation up at the Pacific Design Center as a part of MAN, SUCH AS WE KNOW HIM, IS A COMPUTER. Jon is currently working on completing a 30 minute short called ‘Spectrum Hunter’. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Rebecca Jewell’s Delicate Images Of birds Printed on feathers

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Rebecca Jewell spent a year in New Guinea in 1982 and became inspired by feather artifacts and birds.  She saw how important they were to the people there and was amazed by the beautiful feather headdresses people made.  She went on to study anthropology at Cambridge University in 1985 and then gained a PhD from London’s Royal College of Art in Natural History Illustration.  During that time she would work mainly in watercolor, drawing bird skins at the National History Museum and ethnographic artifacts made out of feathers at the British Museum.

All of these experiences came to influence the body of work she began to create using “ethically sourced” feathers to print on.  Her work is based on careful observational drawing as a way of seeing, recording, investigating and analyzing.  Through a process involving a photo-plate, ink, an etching press and feathers, Jewell creates beautiful and delicate works on feathers depicting birds.  Of the pieces she says: “Over the past years I have drawn and painted feathers and birds, and explored how they have been used to enhance and decorate humans. I am also aware of the plight and precarious status of many species, which I wanted to represent in the delicacy of the image on the feather.”

An artist in residence at the British Museum, Department of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Jewell creates work that explores the shared histories between people that create certain artifacts, the explorers, anthropologists and travelers who obtain them, and the museums that house them.

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DA’NIRO ELLE BROWN’S WEARABLE SCULPTURE

Da’Niro Elle Brown‘s new collection of wearable sculpture, Lumina, premieres tonight (9/29/12) at Skylab Gallery in Columbus, Ohio. Brown is currently a sophomore at the Columbus College of Art and Design where she studies fine art, dance, and fashion design. After the jump are images of two earlier bodies of work Brown has put out – her Industrial and Natural collections.

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Jeannie Phan’s Hair Tangles

Jeannie Phan’s illustrations of figures tied up, tangled, and wrapped in endless hair is a visual delight full of  rich detail and hilarious nostril mullets.

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Figure Drawing: An Essential Guide- A Free Class On Craftsy

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Patricia Watwood

Patricia Watwood

Class Demonstration

Class Demonstration

Patricia Watwood

Patricia Watwood

It’s inarguable that making great art begins with a good foundation in the basics.  And when access to studying foundations in art is free and available anywhere by simply signing up on Craftsy for one of their free online mini classes, studying drawing foundations becomes delightfully accessible to all.

Craftsy offers a wide array of online classes from drawing essentials to watercolor.  Figure Drawing: An Essential Guide, taught by accomplished artist Patricia Watwood is one of the most popular classes. It’s the perfect way to try out Craftsy and experience the ease and convenience of taking a class from your home, at your desired pace. Watwood goes over the basics of rendering the figure with drawing materials in this free mini class. By guiding her students through stages, such as working with graphite pencils for sketching out simple angles, to moving into hatching for shading, drawing a figure becomes demystified.  Watwood, whose gorgeous paintings are featured here, has exhibited her work worldwide at galleries and museums and has been featured on the cover of art magazines.  Her understanding of drawing the figure is clear in her work and her ability to share it with her students is demonstrated in class drawings.

This online class is developed with live models, using classical techniques, making it a great fit for students at any level, from beginners to more advanced artists who simply want to brush up on basics. Convenient features such as being able to bookmark key moments, take video notes and re-watch concepts with the 30-second repeat feature make for a great student experience on Craftsy.  Figure Drawing: An Essential Guide is free, so there’s no reason not to explore and give it a try!

With 29 free mini classes to choose from, we say start with this one and stay and play for a while.  Follow this link for your First Free Mini Class With Craftsy.

This post is sponsored by Craftsy

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The Process Behind Making Barry X Ball’s Purity And Envy Sculptures

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The sculptor Barry X Ball is known for interesting projects. One called ‘Masterpieces’ was especially riveting. He took two Italian sculptures made in the 16th century: Corradini’s La Puria (“Purity (veiled woman)”) and Court’s La Invidia (“Envy”) and created perfected versions of the original. In a statement to his collectors he explains in detail the changes he made and why they are valid artworks on their own and not just copies or appropriations. Ball’s documentation also discusses his process and gives invaluable insight into it.

Both of these sculptures were made using materials other than white Italian marble such as onyx, calcite and black marble. This lends a different dynamic to the work altogether. Unlike white marble, onyx has the ability to glow from within and through the veils of Purity we are able to see light. On the other hand, the calcite material is veined and therefore camouflages Envy’s folds and sweeps creating complexity not there with the original.

Another different perspective on the two Ball pieces is that they are made to depict someone looking into a mirror. This is done with today’s advanced technology and adds a strange narcissistic glance. It’s almost as though we are looking at a more refined version of the sculptures which captures the very old paired with something new. Other changes involved refining of drape, finishing the back and making the pedestals which they are placed much sturdier in order to view the work correctly from all sides.

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Daniel Albrigo

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Daniel Albrigo is a young New York based tattoo/visual artist. Mr. Albrigo has some serious talent in all facets of his art making, just check out these Genesis Breyer P-Orridge inspired paintings…

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