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Matt Johnson

I am really enjoying Matt Johnson’s work.  Based in Los Angeles, Johnson creates a variety of sculptures with a deadpan sense of humor.  Check out some more of his work after the jump!

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B/D Best of 2010- Giovanni Bortolani Is In Stitches

Giovanni Bortolani has this really twisted series of people gutted out and stitched back together. To mix it up a bit, there are some portraits of culinary students.

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Photographer Christian Tagliavini Painstakingly Recreates Paintings From The Medici Era

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Swiss-Italian photographer Christian Tagliavini’s contemporary antique photos blend fine arts and craftsmanship seamlessly into “1503,” his captivating portrait series. 1503 is the birth year of Agnolo Bronzino, an Italian court painter for the Medici family of Florence, whose realistic paintings had an enormous influence on portraiture.

Though Tagliavini’s photos may appear to be historically based oil paintings, they are more than just a literal translation of antiquated art through new technology. The clothes and body positioning echo Bronzino and the light in these portraits is tender and perfect, but it’s the details of the photos that emphasize the modernity of the work-the stylized outfits, exaggerated necks, translucent skin and clear directness of the models’ gazes. Unlike the bold colors of the paintings, the photographs are printed in pale, unsaturated tones, which work to make them feel more contemporary.

“Christian Tagliavini loves designing stories with open endings (requiring observer’s complicity) on unexplored themes or unusual concepts, featuring uncommon people with their lives and their thoughts made visible. This rich and exciting collision of circumstances results in photos as a final product.”

Tagliavini is impressively skilled-not only is he the photographer, he is also the costume designer, set builder, and casting director. He says, “I’m fascinated by the fact that I don’t simply release the shutter, but that the real fun for me is before I take the pictures. I say that I’m not really a photographer, but a workman of photography.”

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Slovenian Honeycomb Architecture

Slovenian architecture firm OFIS won an architecture competition for low cost tiny tourist housing with their honeycomb-inspired design. If urban population density keeps rising, which it should and will (fingers crossed), this is the future! Once you’re done with the honeycombs, check out their other projects, they’re wild! (via)

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Lamia Ziadé

Paris-based Lebanese Illustrator and artist Lamia Ziadé has a “Pop Art” style identified by bright patterns and childishly feminine materials. She is a fan of playing with the historically and socially inappropriate- depicting women flaunting their sexuality, engaging the viewer’s curiosity in the subject’s (often deadpan) gaze. Her work seems to also be concerned with war: she participated in an exhibition titled “Hotel’s War”, addressing the 1970s when different militias involved in the war took over several luxurious hotels in Beirut and forcefully transformed them into their own territory.

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John Malta’s Creepy People

Welcome to John Malta‘s creepy, surreal world where lizards shave your head, cacti wear sunglasses, people sleep on top of giant cats, and everyones eyes look like they just took one too many hits of meth.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Painting On Water

 

I know, I know, this is a bit cheesy. But try to look past the terrible music, the Yanni style haircut, and even the cheesy artwork. What I’m into is the technique. I challenge you, loyal Cult Of Decay members to use this painting technique to make something amazing. Watch the full video after the jump, turn off the computer and get going!

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Colorful X-Rays Show The Shocking Intricacies Of The Human Body

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The photographer Xavier Lucchesi doesn’t use a camera to capture his portraits; instead, he penetrates the human body with an advanced x-ray machine, revealing organs, arteries, and bones. The artist adds color to the medical images, highlighting the intricacies of the human body in electric blues and deep, bloody reds. For Luccesi, the act of seeing is active and passionate; a passing glance is insufficient, and to truly view another truthfully is to dissect and peel away exterior layers.

Lucchesi’s portraits are perhaps those of our deepest human core: when our superficial features are stripped back, a more primal self emerges. Lucchesi’s sitters are laid completely bare; though they might pose or strain, their bodies betray secret inner worlds and open them up to a profound vulnerability. A triptych presents a man in three stages of undress: clothed, then nude, then uncovered and unprotected by skin. As he lays with his arms crossed, the x-ray bears down on him, and he becomes increasingly naked, at the mercy of our eager, inquisitive eyes.

As we reach new levels of intimacy with our own bodies, they reveal themselves like brightly colorful and graphic foreign roadmaps; red blood vessels line the figure like highways, leading to pale geometric bone or grassy green lungs in either direction. Like an intricate maze of machinery or a small, delicate cityscape, the miraculous pieces of the human being—the flesh, the lungs, the ribcage— function autonomously, just beneath the surface of our gaze. Take a look. (via Design Boom)

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