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Nøne Futbol Club’s Humorous And Subversive Sculptures And Installations

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Nøne Futbol Club is a duo of Paris based artists.  They work in a wide variety of mediums and forms from video to installation.  However, nearly all of their work seems to be tied together by a certain mischievous sense of humor.  Though not always overtly political, the duo’s art is definitely subversive.  For example, consider Lift a Finger, the first piece pictured here.  The maneki-neko, usually a statuette of a welcoming or beckoning cat suddenly becomes hostile with a simple change of hand gesture.  The pharase “KEEP WARM BURNOUT THE RICH”  is turned into a branding iron.  The implement not only burns, but more importantly is a tool for displaying and designating ownership.

Nicolas Rosette goes onto describe the duo’s practice saying:

“Nøne Futbol Club is a duo that is capable of mobilizing as many accomplices as necessary to make their works and performances.
The playful component is inseparable from their creative process which tackles the world like a playground for the expression of an art whose nature has continually bordered on the cellophane of the white cube and the great palaces must take the risk of being a mass distribution product. The recursive principle in their work is reversal. It is not about diverting elements from pop culture(or popular culture, the term changing depending on whether this culture comes to us from one side or the other of the Atlantic Ocean) but of a reversal whose final address is always popular culture. A double inversion, whose process of revelation reflects back to us as in a mirror the possible destiny of an art world which has become less subtle than the current popular media cultures; whose practices of critical and jubilatory diversions are the foundation. Would the Nøne Futbol Club be applying to contemporary art what digital cultures have subjected Chuck Norris, the pope and Darth Vader to?”

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Julien Pacaud

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French Illustrator Julien Pacaud is delightfuly eccentric; her works look as if they’ve been dreamed up by children after feasting on their yearly spoils of Halloween candy. (What? Your parents didn’t tell you sugar would give you nightmares?) I would be lying if I told you I had any idea what this soccer-chicken picture means, but I still find it incredibly amusing.

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Cesar Santander’s Hyper-realistic paintings of vintage tin toys

Cesar Santander’s hyper-realist paintings of vintage toys, trinkets, and carousels are gleaming and shining works that will make you take a double take to make sure you’re not looking at a photograph. Dealing with themes of Nostalgia these exquisitely painted images transport us to a simpler time when toys didn’t talk back and were simple images of our favorite cartoons.

“Once I conceive an idea for a painting, I arrange the objects and then use the camera to produce the strongest photographic example of my original idea. Then I paint the photographic image. Superficially, I appear to copy the photograph, but I make many adjustments to the photographic image as I complete the painting. I try to impose my own vision by subtle adjustment of colors, edges and details so that the finished painting is the strongest representation of the original idea.”

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More from Bryan Schnelle…

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B/D featured artist Bryan Schnelle a while back on the blog, and he recently sent us these ‘zines/brochures of his work.

If the black mask on the cover wasn’t an indicator to you that theme was unorthodox, then I don’t know what is! It’s definitely interesting how he places a black mask over the faces of his subjects. In the one instance that he doesn’t, he removes the model’s eyes. Just a little creepy. Maybe it’s a shot at the fashion industry or maybe a comment on the concept of beauty itself. In any case, Bryan Schnelle’s work has definitely struck a nerve with me.

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Over 14,000 Illustrations From The French Revolution Depicting Battalions, Guillotines And Royal Satires Are Now Available Online

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Printed cards illustrating French Revolution scenes. These and another 14,000  illustrations were made available on the French Revolution Digital Archive thanks to the collaboration between Stanford University and the French National Library (Bibliothèque Nationale de France). It’s a mix of caricatures of revolutionary vilains and heroes, key symbols such as the ‘guillotine’ and documents as serious as parliamentary deliberations.

It took several years to bring together the multitude of documents which are now grouped at the French Revolution Digital Archive. It’s been divided into two categories: Parliamentary Archives and French Revolution images dating from 1789.
The data is easily searchable by either random intellectuals or passionate historian. The documents browsed on the site take the form of prints, medals, coins and other elements.

When they don’t represent guillotines instruments or costumes of the time in total seriousness, the illustrations as colorful and amusing. In one of the cards for instance, the people of France, the ‘enemy’ are depicted as a multi-headed beast attacking the aristocracy and the battalion. White, blue and red, tones of the French flag, are mainly used to color the hand drawn cards. A constant reminder, despite the satirical drawings, of the omnipresence and importance of French patriotism at that time.

More illustrations are available on the French Revolution Digital Archive. (via HyperAllergic)

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David Mach’s Mind-Blowing Sculptures Made Of Metal Coat Hangers

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Scottist sculptor David Mach has a penchant for unexpected materials: magazines, matchsticks, and scrabble pieces, to name a few. In his series “Coathangers,” the artist constructs lifelike animals from wire hangers, allowing the pointed metal hooks to extend past the boundaries of the figure. To build these strange cacti-like creatures, Mach works from a plastic mold, applies the hangers, and coats the finished product in nickel.

Mach’s wild beasts, depicted with near realism, look magnificently aggressive when protruding hooked metal. Like defensive porcupines, the seem to be coated in a layer of quills, warding off the touch of curious viewers. The tiger, the stag, and the gorilla each occupies a distinct role in the hierarchy of the natural world; their predator limbs frozen outstretched or fearful mouths held open, they cannot help but resemble the taxidermied animals that roam the halls of natural history museums. Unlike those passive creatures, however, Mach’s animal kingdom is electrified with the addition shining, threatening spokes, eliciting trepidation as much as they do curiosity. Similarly, the artist’s crucifixion presents Jesus Christ as an explosive, angry being, emitting in his pain an agonized cry; here, we might imagine the biblical lines, “My God, why hast though forsaken me?”

Mach’s coat hanger method allows for the rules of sculpture to be broken; his figures are defined not by their enclosed form but also by material that emanates from their bodies as we understand them. Like characters on a static-filled television, they appear as illusions or mirages. Their blurry boundaries allow them to exist in a mysterious space beyond the corporeal. Are these creatures inhabiting the space before us, or are they merely projections, subject to vanishing at any moment? (via Visual News)

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Diego Arroyo’s Photographic Journey Into Kenya

Photographs so striking, they’re guaranteed to give you pause. That’s what Amsterdam-based art director and photographer Diego Arroyo achieves with a look, camera in-hand. Challenging himself to capture the subtle and the intimate in his images, Arroyo travels the globe – from Kenya to Cambodia – searching out the unique stories of strangers and seeking to catch the essence of a people, a place, a nation. Through his pause-giving photographs, it’s possible to visualize his personal efforts to highlight what is most real, as well as the passion that drives the process. Among his more recent works is a photographic series documenting his time among the Samburu, a semi-nomadic pastoralist people, as well as his visit to Lamu, an island along the northern coast of Kenya. Long after their time, the hauntingly intense stares, gentle smiles, and curiosity-furrowed brows of Kenya’s Samburu and the people of Lamu live on in these beautiful images. See more after the jump, and be sure to check out the photographer’s recent series taken in Cambodia by heading over to his Behance page.

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William S. Stone’s Chair Sculptures

William S. Stone’s work blurs the lines between design and art with his reimagined chairs and other domestic furniture.

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