Get Social:

Xavier Antin’s home printing

"Just in Time, or A Short History of Production"

Xavier Antin is a recent grad of Royal College of Art currently based in London. His piece “Just in Time, or A Short History of Production” is a clever recycling of old technologies to make something new. A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history. The final piece is a product created from a very strange offset printing process and doesn’t quite look how you would expect it to! Check out more pictures of “Just in Time” and other works by Xavier after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

RIP Nujabes

Musician Jun Seba, also known as Nujabes passed away late last month after a fatal car crash at age 36. Why it took almost a month later for everyone to catch wind of it, I’m not sure but, pest in peace. You were so young and so amazingly talented. This video above was circulating the web for a bit- “Luv (sic) pt. 2” Nujabes featuring Shing02 and directed by Sou Ootsuki. Doesn’t watching it makes you feel alive? In a really breathtakingly normal way?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Denise Kupferschmidt’s Crude Idols

Denise Kupferschmidt lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. We have featured her collage pieces here in the past. Her new body of work consists of sumi ink and acrylic paintings as well as concrete sculpture. These are explorations into what she calls “Crude Idols”. Using a monochromatic palette she presents the viewer with anonymous objects and artifacts of manufactured significance.

Currently Trending

THE SLAP Is A New Social Experiment Where 40 Random People Hit Each Other In The Face

Max-Landis-Video-1 Max-Landis-Video-2 Max-Landis-Video-3

The Slap, a totally fresh video by filmmaker Max Landis, is a clever response to the famous First Kiss video that went viral three months ago and has been making all of us go awwww up until now. Landis’ video features 40 randomly paired people in a fairly uncomfortable situation – the goal for them was to slap each other in the face. Even if it’s the first time they had met.

According to the author, none of the participants were pressured to do so and all of them were “hit as hard as THEY asked to be hit”. The beauty of this project lies in the contrast between a somewhat violent action of hitting other person and the intimate feeling the participants develop towards each other.

Though Landis really was aiming to mock the famous First Kiss video (which is obvious from the black and white color palette and similar upbeat music), he did go beyond just that. His explanation video called Point Of Impact explains the reasons for him to make “The Slap” in the first place.

“What is violence? It’s really just a label, isn’t it, if you let your mind go to a dark place. I decided to define violence as “non-consensual physical interference;” <…> What is trust? Do you trust someone not to hurt you? Are you even thinking about it? Do you care if they hurt you if you trust them? <…> The theory was: A slap, robbed of its violating context, is more intimate than a kiss. My theory, as it turned out, was right.”

Btw, did you notice the cherry on top? At 1:48, there’s Haley Joel Osment (yup, the kid from The Sixth Sense) being slapped straight into his lush beard.

Currently Trending

Seungae Lee’s Mythical Beasts

The mythical creatures and monsters in Korean artist Seungae Lee’s drawings twist, morph, and transform into one another while simultaneously doing battle for their life.

Currently Trending

Edward Lipski

I genuinely enjoy some of Edward Lipski’s thickly applied mixed media sculptures. He works with all kinds of materials to create these amazingly entertaining, and somewhat creepy pieces.

Currently Trending

Bodies In The Multiverse: The Expressive Digital Art Of Adam Martinakis

Adam Martinakis - Digital Art Adam Martinakis - Digital Art Adam Martinakis - Digital ArtAdam Martinakis - Digital Art

Adam Martinakis is an artist who uses computer-generated visual media to explore the body’s relationship with life, death, and sexuality in the digital age. His images are intensely expressive, displaying the human figure in various states of destruction, transformation, and relation: people crumbling apart into darkness, disembodied limbs reaching from iron walls, and lovers with bodies resembling circulatory systems embracing in various states of intimacy. In a world wherein cyber culture is so often equated with alienation and artificiality, Martinakis has done a brilliant job redefining that realm as a facet of human identity, infusing our digital existences with the same love, passion, grief, and pain we experience in our corporeal world.

To Martinakis, the body is not an isolated, autonomous vessel; it is “a small chain link of a big project in the history of existence,” and compressed within it is all the beauty and mystery of the cosmos. Interested in multiverse theories, Martinakis tries to express the vast range of human experience through his artwork. His creations are intensely expressive and visceral; you sense immediately what aspect of life he has rendered. However, they are not simply about life, death, or sexual expression in isolation. All of these experiences are depicted in perpetual co-relation — life becoming death and vice versa, the architecture of the body being made and unmade and made again. Desire, too, is not simply a solitary, material instance, as his interlaced lovers signify; it is a fluid phenomenon, implicating both molecular connections and intricate (and sometimes violent) power dynamics.

“The human body is a wonderful and expressive tool, which gives me the ability to experiment with aspects of human nature,” Martinakis explains. The physical body, of course, is the medium through which we manifest our existences and relationships in the world — something that our immaterial, digitized lives might complicate. For this artist, however, cyber culture is a new beginning of self-understanding, and “it is also a new opportunity to redefine our own nature and the comprehension of perception.” Visit Martinakiswebsite and Facebook page to further explore how he has visualized the vast possibilities for bodies and identities in the digital age. (Via beautiful.bizarre)

Currently Trending

New Artist Interview: Grant Barnhart

 

01guitar

"Guitar Backstabs"

The Midwest, motorcycles, cowboy boots, blue jeans, football—imagery associated with classic Americana—kicks, charges, rodeos and bedazzles its way through Grant Barnhart’s works. Bipolar homages/parodies on the goold old stuff that makes up our national iconography and ideaology, Barnhart’s works are a feast of star spangled satire and sincere adoration. Read the full interview after the jump.

 

Currently Trending