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Tom Deininger’s Junk Portraits and sculptures

I’m absolutely loving these explosive junk portraits and sculptures by Tom Deininger. Comprised of found objects each piece is created with various plastic and metal debris that the artist finds. The work reminds me a little of Vik Muniz but Tom still gets a pass in my book.

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Othelo Gervacio’s Washed Out Graphics

 

Othelo Gervacio’s Horror/Skate/Metal ink wash work is where it’s at. Gervacio’s technique renders skeletons, reapers, and ghosts just softly enough to mix up the whole graphics game. With a nice mix of controlled bleeding and tight line work, this is a prime example of how this stuff should be done. Where Neckface might parody, Gervacio comes in and celebrates, proving that imitation is not always a form of surrendered creativity.

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Ei Ka

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Eibatova Karina a.k.a Ei Ka is an illustrator based in Moscow, Russia. I love her creative typography and her illustration skills. She also does photography! The well trained lines and subtle color is what makes me fall in love with her work.

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Jonathan Payne’s Grotesque Body Sculptures Will Make You Cringe

Jonathan Payne - Sculpture Jonathan Payne - Sculpture Jonathan Payne - Sculpture Jonathan Payne - Sculpture

Jonathan Payne’s sculptures of remixed human body parts are utterly disgusting. Warty skin and overgrown toenails, a tooth-penis-nipple hybrid, and a tongue with teeth in place of taste buds are some of the highlights of his shudder-worthy pieces. The sculptures evoke a very physical reaction in the viewer. They are extremely life-like, and so it’s easy to project your own senses into the toes and teeth, to imagine what it would feel like to have those body parts connected together. They’re anxiety inducing, but you can’t look away, they’re so horrifyingly real. If you’re wondering what they’re made of to look so realistic, Payne uses super sculpey, polymer clay, acrylic, and human hair.

Payne calls the sculptures Fleshlettes, and in his description says that he’s interested in “bizarre and fantastical surrealist characters”. Surrealism was concerned very much with the psyche, and I think Payne’s work does a good job of withdrawing and exploring some deep set insecurities with ugliness and deformation in his strange body part sculptures.

In an article on the blog Street Anatomy, it’s listed that each sculpture has a kind of name and character. The toothed tongue, for instance, is Tonya, and she’s the mother of all Fleshlettes. The eyeball is named Eileen “for obvious reasons”. This sense of humour is refreshing and also seems to suit the strange though ultimately nonthreatening characters.

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Erin M Riley’s Naughty Handwoven Tapestries

Philadelphia based artist Erin M Riley creates incredible handwoven tapestries with hand dyed wool on nylon warp.  Her work touches on issues of death, self exploitation through gender and the internet, addiction, and loneliness.

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Pier Francesco Martini’s Painted Pixels

Pier Francesco Martini‘s digital self portraits are an interesting twist to one of the oldest practices in art.

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Making The Invisible Visible

This might be one of the most inventive works of advertising and street art that i’ve seen all year! Brothers and Sisters creative duo have teamed up with anonymous German street art collective Mentalgassi, to create art installations for Amnesty International. Called Making the Invisible Visible, the posters highlight the case of Troy Davis, a 42-year-old man who has been on death row for 19 years in the USA, despite serious doubts about his conviction.

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Art and Fashion Collide In The Psychedelic Dreamscapes Of Marina Fini

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

At the intersection of fashion, photography, film, stagecraft, and design, artist Marina Fini creates hallucinatory, alternative worlds. Based in California, she collaborates with friends and artists alike in the staging of these otherworldly scenes, using colorful costumes and her own handmade, plexiglass jewelry to turn her photographic subjects into ethereal cyber goddesses. When asked how she builds these characters, Fini remarked, “there’s something about transforming someone into someone they wouldn’t normally be … that is, creating an extension of themselves that I see in them.” All of her characters exude a captivating power, like the whimsical and intangible figures seen through a psychedelic dream. By exploring alternative selves in familiar contexts – a convenience store, or the Californian seaside, for example – Fini explores how subjecthood is fluid, and how such creative “shape-shifting” can alter they way we perceive our immediate reality.

While beautiful, there are also darker and more satirical elements in Fini’s work; in her own words, there’s something compelling about “juxtaposing what we associate as innocent with something horrific or insane.” In her short film Tree Temple, for example, a group of forest sprites — their faces eerily obscured by their colorful hair — dance feverishly around an altar made of Apple computers. Shortly after destroying the altar in their frenzy, they fade into mourning and death. As this film exemplifies, integrated throughout Fini’s scenes are emblems of our contemporary cyber culture — the Apple logo, wifi symbol, hand cursor, and so on. Speaking to this, Fini says that the use of such icons “specifically pokes fun at our internet-obsessed culture,” thereby producing a playful — and sometimes dark — cultural critique of our digitized existences.

In addition to her photographs and videos, Fini is well-known for her aforementioned jewelry, as seen on many of the models in these photos. In pursuit of new projects, she has recently announced that she will be phasing out her jewelry, but her Etsy shop will remain open until mid-January 2015. If you enjoy immersive art and playful reconfigurations of reality, check out the surreal worlds she has created on her website and Tumblr pages.

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