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Kevin Corrado’s Human Limbs DippedIn Paint Cleverly Play With Landscapes

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In the photographic works by Kevin Corrado, human limbs and objects intersect with the landscape. They are painted over, dipped, and blend in the with the horizon line. The series entitled Transfer best showcases this idea as different hands are encased in varying colors of paint. Corrado talks about how this is not only a connection made design-wise, but our notions about the things we see. He writes:

The project began as a playful idea of the ocean being a giant sea of blue paint rather than water. The idea of a blue sea is so engraved into our minds, even though in most cases, water is not actually blue. In all three pieces, a hand becomes covered in paint by touching a landscape of that color. In its entirety, the project speaks about our intense connection between common landscapes and their assigned colors. Possibly something that was instilled in us during our elementary days. The project also addresses my role as an artist, and what color I will choose for my landscapes, even though my tool of choice is a camera (a tad bit ironic). A painter is given the task to paint a tree, but that painter must choose to use green paint.

The quietly compelling images play with our sense of scale; hands are huge, looking like giants and whose veins appear large enough to line up with the choppy waves. (Via Slow Art Day)

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Mark Holthusen Photographs Eerie Similarities Between Show Dogs And Owners

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In a professional dog show, the canines are supposed to be the stars, and the humans’ presence fall to wayside. But, just because people aren’t the main focus doesn’t mean that they aren’t picture-worthy themselves. When photographer Mark Holthusen was on an advertising assignment for Purina at the National Dog Show, he was supposed to just take pictures of the dogs. He also snapped these photos while their owners were prepping the canines. The result is a candid series titled Second in Show.

Holthusen set the portraits against a solid black background that highlights the gestures and facial expressions of the owners. Some are seen seriously primping and preparing for the dog’s show, while others look more relaxed and even eccentric. And, you can’t help but notice how the duos (or trio) take after each other. Hair color, style, and demeanor are all eerily similar, proving that people really can look like their pets.

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Matthew Kelly

asmyfather2 Matthew Kelly is a photographer living and working in NYC. His photography is definitely nothing less than unique. His current project “As My Father,” depicts a young man stepping into his father’s shoes, literally. Matthew’s other photos have the same portrait like qualities, and just like the first project, tell a dramatic story. Check out his website for more of his work and upcoming projects.

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Goto Atsuko’s Ethereal Paintings Are A Zombie Fairytale Come To Life

Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments Goto Atsuko - cotton, glue, pigments

Imagine Lolita has joined the cast of The Walking Dead and found a meadow to hide in, and you will get Japanese artist Goto Atsuko’s incredible paintings. They are a mixture between something incredibly sweet and innocent, and something deadly poisonous that features only in nightmares. Her work features sullen, melancholic girls with large eyes and awkward features, and an overload of flowers, leaves, bees, butterflies, ribbons and bows. It’s like a cross between a Tim Burton animation, zombie profiling, and a child’s dark fairytale – all top of with a serving of strawberries and cream.

Compiled from cotton, glue, pigments, gum arabic and lapis lazuli, Atsuko uses both mundane and precious materials – again stressing the contrast between good and bad; naughty and nice. Atsuko’s paintings are a beautiful, haunting combination of childhood and adulthood, and how the two can exist together harmoniously. She shows us everything is not as simple as it seems, maybe that we all have a complicated persona – we are troubled one minute, and celebrating life with the animal kingdom the next. To see more profiles of her beautiful heavenly-devil-children-creatures, see her website here. (Via Booooooom)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Anti Gravity Free Fall

Ever think about what it would be like if gravity disappeared in the middle of the night? Zurich raised and NYC based filmmaker Elias Ressegatti did. Here are the results.

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Jackie Dives Documents Her Brother’s Recovery From Heroin Addiction

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Jackie and her brother together. On his first day in the world, and a few years later.

Jackie Dives - Photography

Sober.

Jackie Dives - Photography

60mg methadone + heroin.

Jackie Dives is a Vancouver-based portrait and documentary photographer who has bravely followed her brother’s recovery from heroin addiction. The project began nearly a year ago, when her brother asked her to capture his progress. Jackie agreed, explaining she “wanted to do it as a record for him, hopefully [as] a way for him to remember the severity of his addiction, and prevent him from relapsing.” The images are unfailing in their honesty, capturing fluctuations of strength, hope, pain, and vulnerability. We see him smiling, looking healthy, and sitting beside his girlfriend (who bravely accepted that Jackie take her photograph post-breast augmentation, thus adding another dimension of fearlessness and candidness to the series). In other photos, he looks troubled, his face lined with pain and sadness. The emotion emanating from these images is palpable, and even though Jackie’s brother may be unknown to us, his portraits of struggle and hope inspire a profound sense of empathy and acceptance for individuals enduring the trials of drug addiction and recovery.

What makes this series even more significant is the fact that, for Jackie, her love-infused photographic ambitions began with her brother. Eight years his senior, Jackie began documenting him as soon as he was born; as she writes in her Artist Statement, “Because of our age gap, photography was a realistic way for us to connect that didn’t require us to have much in common, other than being in the same room.” He was not an easy subject; “he moved fast,” and was uninterested in the art she was trying to create. As a result, Jackie became adept at working on the fly, less concerned about refinement and perfection, and interested instead in snapping the purity of a moment. These experiences documenting her brother have developed the core of her artistic objectives and philosophies; while working in the fields of family, event, and travel photography, true portraiture is always her primary focus:

“What’s important to me is simply a moment in the life of my subject. It is not forced or artificial. I want to show my subject truly. […] Ultimately, it’s about letting people continue to be themselves, and not stopping the moment, but letting it flow on, and being adaptable to it. I only want to capture what is actually happening, and in doing that, take a true portrait.” (Source)

Visit Jackie’s website to see more images from this powerful series, as well as many other beautiful portraits and projects. Her Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook page are also up-to-date with her most recent and ongoing work, so be sure to check out those as well. More images of her brother’s recovery after the jump.

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Saddam’s Palaces

"Uday's Palace", Jebel Makhoul, Iraq 2009

"Uday's Palace", Jebel Makhoul, Iraq 2009

Photographer Richard Mosse was recently featured BLDGBLOG, one of my favorite architecture blogs run by Geoff Manaugh. The pictures show the extravagance of Saddam Hussein’s imperial palaces converted to plywood built forts resembling college dorms with all its amenities of “weight sets, flags, partition walls, sofas, basketball hoops, and even posters of bikini’d women have been imported to fill Saddam’s spatial residuum. The effect is oddly decorative, as if someone has simply moved in for a long weekend, unpacking an assortment of mundane possessions. The effect is like an ironic form of camouflage, making the perilously foreign seem all the more familiar and habitable—a kind of military twist on postmodern interior design.” See more of what Mosse has to say about his project after the jump.

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Linda Ford’s Somatic therapies BDSM Masks

Linda Ford’s drawings and collages were informed by hear early experiences of visiting the Worcester Insane Asylum where her father worked.

“My recent work is informed by Somatic therapies and BDSM practices. as well as other turn-the-century pseudosciences such as Phrenology. Early experiences of visiting the “Worcester Insane Asylum” (as it was called in the 1800’s) where my father worked during my childhood, as well as my own employment as a mental health counselor have had lasting affects on my preoccupation with bodies that transgress boundaries. Experiences with somatic therapies, which focus on mining bodily sensation in order to “release” traumatic experience, led me to research the early innovations of Wilhelm Reich. Reich proposed that mental states have a corresponding “physical attitude” that is expressed in the body as muscular rigidity or “body armor”. In his view, a response that begins in childhood as a defense against overwhelming anxiety or trauma can become an “emotional and physical straightjacket” in adulthood. By drawing on these disciplines, I am accessing the body as a sculptural object whose meaning and content is manifested in its skin, muscle and bone.

This work reconfigures the unified portrait, to investigate the fragmented nature of identity and self-knowledge. In the “Self-Discipline” charcoal drawings and their digitally dismantled and refashioned collages, I correlate female desire, monstrosity and excess. The family portrait collages, juxtapose turn-of-the-century photographs with hand-rendered self-portraiture elements, to merge contexts and time periods and explore the constricted body language of subjects uncomfortable in front of the camera and perhaps within their own skins. By creating “Composite Portraits” like those invented in 1881 by Francis Galton (the founder of eugenics) for the purpose of identifying physical, mental, and social deviance, I seek to excavate somatic inheritance as a tool for self-understanding. The play of outer and inner; surface and depth; what is hidden and what is revealed – is at the heart of my use of animal tissue as covering (armor/clothing/skin). The “Body Armor” series of altered fetish-wear, sutured from hog gut, identifies psychological/somatic accumulation in the body and fantasizes the ways in which internalized control, trauma and marginalization may be recuperated.”

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