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Placer Deshacer


Not really sure what Placer Deshacer (it seems they are a musical group with an alter-presence) is about but these pictures remind me of educational videos from the 70s and 80s, or the vague way that conceptual art is photographed. I love how the absence of color makes the human body look so mysterious and full of knowledge…

 

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James Lester

 
I have never been to Leeds, the birthplace and residence of James Lester, photographer. To say the least the nature of his photographs paint a curious picture.

 

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Matt Burden’s Brutal Graphics

Welcome to the world of brutal graphics care of UK based artist Matt Burden.

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Would you buy this milk?

Milk carton

Clean, beautiful, and informative packaging design by Audree rethinks those nutritional figures we always take for granted. If everything we ate had this sort of packaging, would we still be eating it? Is ignorance bliss??

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Dot One Designs Unique Scarves And Prints Based On Your DNA

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London based company Dot One takes product customization to the next level. The company, named after the 0.1 percent of a genetic sequence that makes each human unique, uses your DNA samples to create one of a kind products (such as scarves and prints) from the very part of your genome that makes you distinct. The company requires a simple cheek swab DNA test (the type made popular by direct-to-consumer personal genome tests such as 23andMe). Dot One then outsources the lab testing to AlphaBioLabs, where they extract, identify, and use DNA profiling to distinguish the desired portion of the code. AlphaBioLabs does this by creating a genetic finger print through scanning for Short Tandem Repeats (STRs), which are tiny bits of genetic code that are different for every person (except identical twins, of course). Once Dot One has the genetic finger print, they use an algorithm to translate these codes into a color, resulting in a pattern that is personalized to your specific DNA. These patterns are designed to imitate what a DNA sample would  look like in a genetic gel test in a lab. While these products are made through a high technological process, they are reminiscent to traditional weavings and folk art patterns. They possess a true quality of something warm and special. You can even get a Tartan, which is created from the DNA of two people, or get a poster of your family tree. Cute. (Via HYPERALLERGIC)

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Brock Davis’ Playful Food Sculptures

Brock Davis lives and works in Minneapolis. In addition to many art and design projects he has an ongoing series of delightful sculptures made from the food he interacts with on a daily basis. Pieces like Broccoli House, Gummy Bear Skin Rug and Rice Krispyhenge are sure to entice laughter. Davis is one in a long line of creatives who inspire us to see mundane objects as opportunities to playfully manipulate.

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Wood Sculptures Recall Iconic Objects And Ironically Examine Worn-Out Ideas In Contemporary Art

Lee Stoetzel - Sculpture Lee Stoetzel - Sculpture Lee Stoetzel - SculptureLee Stoetzel carves fast food, life-size VW buses, vintage Mac computers, and even fine art from wood, recalling iconic objects, and ironically, examining worn-out symbols or ideas in contemporary art, initially cultivated from the likes of Chuck Close, Rube Goldberg, and Claes Oldenburg.

Whether its mesquite or cypress, each renewable resource favors sinewy flaws or wood marks that, according to Stoetzel, feel comparable to brush strokes, providing another layer of texture and pop of craftsmanship.

Check out the video of Stoetzel discussing his work in his studio and see a few more stills after the jump.

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Crufts Dog Show- Extraordinary Dogs, Ordinary People

Loving photographer Martin Usborne’s series on dog shows. Here is more about the project in the artists own words.
“Crufts, the world’s biggest dog show that takes place in Birmingham each year, was under intense scrutiny a few years ago when a secret TV documentary argued that dog inbreeding was essentially unhealthy and cruel. As a dog-lover and a pedigree owner I thought I had better see what it was all about.

Much to my surprise (and slight disappointment) Crufts is decidedly pleasant. I half expected to capture malicious owners that looked fully like their pets. But the impression is of a prosaic middle-England gathering of weekend enthusiasts. The dog owners are friendly and, dare I say it, normal. Although they trim their dogs’ heads into perfect spheres and their tails into cascades of pure silk they couldn’t be more down to earth. They remind me of Sunday gardeners who trim their hedges into the shape of leaping dolphins and then go inside to watch Antiques Roadshow on TV. The vast halls, despite being full of thousands of different breeds are strangely quiet and more surprising than this – almost turd-free. The merchandising stalls, which sit around the perimeter of the space and sell marginally tasteless doggy-tat (buy two bottles of ‘Urine-off’ and receive a free 100% fish-based dog chew) are harmless enough. And amongst this the dogs themselves seem to be willing,  as if they too have read the convention guide and know they must wait their turn to appear on the green carpet.

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