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Michael Bussell

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Michael Bussell, a student at the Maryland Institute College of Art, is already creating some beautiful photography. His most recent series “Shrines” is a study of habitual human practices and how they relate to religious iconography. Maybe cleanliness really is next to Godliness.

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Eske Rex’s Drawing Machine

eske rex installation4 eske rex installation10

eske rex installation1

Its difficult to say whether the drawings or the machine is the work of art here.  Artist Eske Rex created the Drawing Machine which in turn produces ink drawings.  Two pendulums are attached to an arm which is equipped with a ball point pen.  Once the pendulums are set in motion the arms record the contraption’s movement by creating a singular work of art.  Beyond each piece’s pleasing aesthetic is something just as intriguing.  In a way, each drawing documents a very specific movement and time.

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Liz Insogna’s Afterlife

Liz Insogna‘s Afterlife draws from Greek mythology surrounding the realm of Hades. Two bodies of water, Lethe and the Pool of Memory, offer dead souls a couple of options in how they want to handle their past life’s memories when reincarnated. Common souls flocked to Lethe to wipe the slate clean. For those who resisted the temptation of Lethe and convinced the guards to let them pass, the Pool of Memory promised knowledge of past lives as well as the future well into your new life.
It’s a rich territory that Liz Insogna explores with dream-like watercolors and oils, lingering, swirling and fading near subjects that seem despondent.

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Shu Yong’s Creates The Worlds Weirdest Waterfall Out Of Toilets, Sinks And Urinals

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Chinese artist Shu Yong created an atypical waterfall using upwards of 10,000 recycled toilets, sinks and urinals.  The project took two months for Shu Young and his team to complete and covers a wall 100 meters long and 5 meters high.  Originally designed for the Foshan Pottery and Porcelain Festival, a porcelain product tradeshow, the piece is now installed as a permanent piece of public art.  Each toilet was connected to a tap so that they could be flushed—the point being to give a viewer an idea of just how much water is used in a city as large as Foshan.

Shu Yong typically works in many mediums, ranging from painting, photography, sculpture and performance, always interested in “bubbles.”  For Shu, bubbles are not just a symbol, they’re also a concept.  Shu says, “I use various methods to deduce bubble, making it a totem in both conception and form.”  Alongside the Toilet Waterfall Shu installed one of his “Bubble Women,” a sculpture of ballooning women’s breasts.  A seemingly unusual pairing, Shu uses the Bubble Women as a reflection of the motivations and interests of modern day society.  Juxtaposing the two works makes for a bizarre, yet strangely effective, commentary on contemporary culture.  Shu believes in using such provocative work to address cultural mythology, politics and contemporary anxiety in China, or as he calls it, “his laboratory.”  (via amusingplanet)

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Hans Hemmert

German artist Hans Hemmert takes the squeaky goodness of balloons and covers everyday scenes in latex wonder. I can’t imagine many things more fun than romping around in a big yellow balloon.

I especially enjoyed his balloon-people, which you can see after the jump along with a video showing the works in motion.

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Attack Of The Giant Moths…Created From Textiles And Embroidery!

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita - fabric, cotton, fake fur, fabric paint, embroidery thread, wire, and feathers

Yumi Okita uses her amazing artistic skills to create colorful and large sculptures of moths and butterflies, along with other insects. This North Carolina based artist uses various techniques in textiles and embroidery to form her soft and colorful creatures. Each insect is made up of an extremely eclectic group of materials including fabric, embroidery, feathers, fabric paint, cotton, fake fur, and wire. The amount of materials, time, and skill needed to create each piece is apparent as you examine each soft and stunning creation. Not only are Okita’s moths and butterflies brightly colored to perfection, but are also much larger than life! Including wingspan, many of them measure up to nearly twelve inches.

The color of the thread used in the embroidery involved in Okita’s process may or may not be true to nature, containing bright magentas, brilliant blues, and deep greens, but create extremely eye-catching pieces none-the-less. Entomology, the study of insects, has long been popular as many people collect and display butterfly and moth specimens. Okita uses this concept and takes it to a whole new level. Instead of being pinned in a display case under glass, her “specimens” of butterflies and moths are larger than life, inviting to be touched. These fun and remarkably crafted insects can be found on Yumi Okita’s etsy sight, where you can buy one of these gorgeous specimens for yourself! (via Booooom)

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CLICK TO COLLECT- AFFORDABLE ARTIST ORIGINALS Presents: Ben Tegel

Ben Tegel,  Helter Skelter 1, 2008
22″ x 30″,  ink on paper

Welcome to the second week of Click To Collect, Beautiful/Decay’s new campaign to help art lovers start their collection of original artists works at affordable prices. Our second featured artist is Ben Tegel whose gorgeously rendered drawings have graced the pages of our print publication, apparel, and website dozens of times. Ben’s iconic Helter Skelter drawing which depicts the faces of Charles manson through the ages was one of the most popular  Beautiful/Decay t-shirt graphics ever made. Now you can purchase the original piece and add it to your collection today! See the rest of the available work by Ben Tegel and read more about our Click To Collect project after the jump!


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Symbols Of Sikh: The New Faces Of An Old Religion Captured Like Never Before

Amit and Naroop - photograph

Amit and Naroop - photograph

Amit and Naroop - photograph  Amit and Naroop - photograph

The Singh Project is a wonderful, celebratory look at a modern, multicultural Britain and features members of the Sikh community. British photographers Amit and Naroop are exhibiting 35 very different portraits as a visual exploration of faith, style and identity. These intimate images highlight two very important symbols of the Sikh lifestyle – the beard and the turban (Dahar). The turban in particular is a representation of honor, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety. Sikh men (and women) wear the turban to cover their long, uncut hair (kesh), and are also seen in this series brandishing a traditional Sikh sword (kirpan).

Originating in South Asia – primarily in India, Singh was a popular middle name or surname for lords and warriors. Meaning Lion (from the Sanskrit word Simha/Sinha), it was later adopted by the Sikh religion, and today is compulsory for all baptized Sikh males. The sense of pride connected with the history of the name Singh is evident on the faces of these men. They obviously are very proud of being Sikh and enjoy their religion outwardly.

“Many religions determine the way their followers look, but none have such a dramatic and definite ‘look’ as Sikhism. And yet, with 30 million Sikhs in the world, there are almost as many ways to wear the turban and beard as there are Sikhs…The men who feature in this project are businessmen, boxers, IT professionals, doctors, fashion stylists, temple volunteers, magicians and a host of other occupations all adapting and interpreting the Sikh traditions in their own way.” (Source)

The appeal of the beard is still proving popular – after successfully raising 10,000 pounds through Kickstarter (see video here), Amit and Naroop are hosting a free exhibition of the prints opening at The Framers Gallery in Central London from 3rd-15th November.

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