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The Dance of Undressing

Swiss/Danish art duo known simply as PUTPUT blurs the lines between photography, design, and conceptual art wonderfully.  For their series of photographs titled Undress, PUTPUT isolates a daily dance.  On the series, the duo comments:

” The ‘Undress’ series highlights an everyday choreography undertaken by the majority of people on a daily basis. The garment becomes central and embodies the movement.”

The photographs transform a mundane task into a beautiful flash of time.  Undress further presents an especially intimate and unguarded moment with the attention of an abstract artist.

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Beccy Ridsdel’s unorthodox dinnerware

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English ceramist Beccy Ridsdel has worked as ceramics technician at York College for nearly 10 years and recently discovered her love of bone china and porcelain. Her latest work is an installation set up as an interrupted laboratory experiment – ceramics being dissected, like an autopsy, to find out what lays beneath the surface. This dinnerware cruelty/beautification was inspired by her mother, who is also a ceramist!

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Grotesque Photos Capture The Pains And Joys Of Womanhood

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In her visceral, raw still lifes, the 21-year-old photographer Madison Carroll captures the grotesque remains of meaningful moments gone by. Used condoms, pregnancy tests, and blood stains grace her compositions, punctuating a narrative that skips dizzyingly from girlhood to womanhood, from innocence to experience. As if plucked from last night’s waste basket, these soiled items emerge; in the context of Carroll’s clean, immaculate technique, they become all the more haunting.

As if part of some unusual crime scene, waste products are left out, forensically archived by Carroll’s lens. Here, rotting fruit and old bandaids mark not a murder but the more gradual, subtle trauma of growing up, of being woman. Like a pool of blood, tea spills from a delicate, shattered china cup; a lemon, once fresh and aromatic, rots. An egg cracks, the yoke spilling out into a satin pair of Victoria’s Secret underwear like a giant, monstrous ovum released during menstruation.

In Carroll’s disturbing yet thrilling realm, the dangers and joys of femaleness collide in a moment of brutal self-reflection. Death and fertility become indistinguishable. In a frilly, feminine doily, a cockroach lies dead, rotting beside a snuffed-out cigarette. A Clear Blue pregnancy test sits on an old rust-stained rag, the urine and tissue in the toilet simply a blurred afterthought.

Like a hoarder of significant items, Carroll’s lens seeks out that which might be thrown away, forgotten by time. A male lover, sprawled on the bed, is captured asleep, in a state of heightened vulnerability, his pale nakedness pressing against the border of the frame. At the artist’s feet, a condom evidences the intimacy that occurred minutes or hours before. (via Feature Shoot and iGNANT)

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Andreas Frank’s Manipulated Photos Exhibited Underwater In A Sunken Ship

A little while ago, Andreas Frank took a dive down to the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a  United States missile tracking ship that was recently sunk 7 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida in order to create an artificial reef. While he was down there, Frank, who is a successful commercial photographer, took pictures of the wreck. He used the resulting images as the basis for a series of digitally manipulated photos depicting various underwater happenings on the sunken ship. The cool part: he then staged an exhibition of the photos on the deck of the ship! Divers took in the exhibit in full scuba gear. I’m not sure that bobbing up and down under water is the best way to take in Frank’s work, but it is kinda cool. See more photos from the Vandenberg- Life Below the Surface show after the jump, as well as a video of divers checking out the pictures while down by the ship.

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Oleg Dou’s Children’s Death Portraits

Oleg Dou takes inspiration from 20th century portraits of dead children and creates an arresting series of ghostly images that are at once innocent and frightening.

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Sponsored Post: Madeline Hagy’s Eye-Catching Format Portfolio Showcases Her Boldly Bizarre Illustrations And Collages

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madeline-hagy-format-portfolio-3We discovered Madeline Hagy and her boldly bizarre work on Format’s Spotlight page. Her portfolio elegantly displays her variety of work, from collages and illustrations to posters and prints. With her hallucinogenic forms and intriguing (and oft-grotesque) combinations of images, the clean and minimalist theme provided by the portfolio-building website Format is vital in showcasing the audacious complexity of Madeline’s work. With its fast-loading pages, Format is the perfect website for an artist’s portfolio, as you can scroll and view Madeline’s work without interruption. Another great feature that Format offers is the ability to sort work by category: you’ll notice you can view Madeline’s collages, sketchbook works, and prints separately.

Featured here are the works under the “collages” category, which provides an enticing sample of Madeline’s style and work. Among the images you’ll see a mash-up of recurring motifs, such as weeping eyes, raw meat, and deranged cartoon monsters. Adding to the series is a grotesque flavor of parody, mixing stylish, high fashion images with strange headwear, fleshless body parts, and googly eyes. In one way, Madeline’s work can be seen as a creative evolution of the magazine covers we disfigured with pens as children; going more in depth, we can read her collages as playful “dissections” that rearrange and distort magazine images to poke fun at the beauty industry. In either case, there is a lot to be seen and enjoyed on Madeline’s website, demonstrating that Format is the easiest way to make a portfolio that looks great and won’t distract from your work.

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Neil Dawson’s Suspended Sculptures Appear To Defy Gravity

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New Zealand based sculptor Neil Dawson constructs sculptures made from aluminum and stainless steel, creating geometric shapes that appear to floating mid-air or suspended by nearly invisible reinforcements. Some of them look like simple illustrations, drawn in the air, while others are more complex constructions. Dawson often suspends his weightless work in civic spaces and skyscapes, creating gravity-defying, airy illusions.

“There’s something sanctified about a gallery environment because the works are physically and visually static,” Dawson says. “With public sculpture there’s a real dynamism because it’s constantly changing with the light and the elements. The majority of my work has more holes in it than substance – it’s about looking through things, not just at things. There’s always an element of surprise,” he says, noting the appearance of his sculptures changes day to day, and that the experience is unique to each viewer. “When art is frozen in a gallery, it loses those possibilities.” (via juxtapoz)

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A Lifesize Dollhouse Built And Burned By Heather Benning

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Heather Benning refurbished an abandoned farmhouse built in the 60s and turned it into a life-sized Dollhouse in the style of the era. Her project began in 2005, as she remade the house to be used, re-shingling the roof with recycled shingles, restoring and furnishing the house, and stood open to the public until 2013. She removed the north side of the building, and replaced it with plexi-glass, to look like an authentic children’s toy. When the building was no longer structurally sound, Benning – who has already planned for such an event – burned it down. The resulting images of the 8 year long project are lovely, although I’m sure seeing the thing in life would be much more exciting!

Benning grew up on a farm in Saskatchewan, Canada. It has profoundly influenced her practice. Rather than installing in urban centers, as is the general practice of sculpture and installation artists – because, you know, there are more people to see your work – she installs in rural settings similar to where she grew up.

Benning speaks about her relationship to farmhouses:

I grew up on a farm in Saskatchewan. I was affected by my surroundings; when I was young, my parents would give me disused farm buildings for “play-houses.”

There was also an abandoned farmyard/house about a mile through the field on some land my father worked. In the summer months and on weekends, I would spend days exploring this yard and house, imagining what it was prior—who the people were, make up stories why they left. My sister and I would play “pioneer” based on the tales our grandmothers told us.

(Article and quote via Canadian Art)

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