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Interview: Jason Redwood

Acrylic, cell vinyl, and spray paint on panel 20 5/8”x12”

Acrylic, cell vinyl, and spray paint on panel 20 5/8”x12”

Jason Redwood creates transmogrophic kalleidoscopic explosions of pop culture saturated lucid dreams. With a background in illustration and design, many of his images embody a vibrant, hard-edge pop aesthetic that could almost be digitally generated. In fact- Redwood sites the visual vernacular of advertising, web, television, billboards–the current day image glut–as being woven into his insane tapestries. Childhood memories, strange visions, and humor also play off each other in hypersectra, hypersaturated colors, into a “beautifully perverse mega-meal,” as Redwood describes them. His works are visual feasts of fancy, intensely seductive eye-candy that, if they were allowed to flash and vibrate on a moving screen, would probably induce seizures–but in a transcendant, ecstatic way.

 

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Antonio Paucar’s Figurative Installations Made From Dead Flies

 

The installations of Peruvian artist Antonio Paucar utilize a rather uncommon material: dead flies.  By suspending dead flies from nylon string as well as meticulously placing them on the ground Paucaur painstakingly builds each pieces.  The swarm of flies loosely forms the image of a human figure.  The hazy form created by the collective flies imply the memory of a person, particularly in relation to the space it inhabitants.  Further, the flies seem to suggest the idea of death or decay.  The last four photos are taken from a piece installed in Germany’s Sacrow palace, a building dating back to the 17th century.  The grounds had been inhabited by Prussian aristocrats, high ranking Nazi officials, as well as communist secret police.

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Installation: 400 Chairs Assembled into a Sine Wave for Freedom Park in Atlanta

“Sitting is perhaps the most common condition from which we experience architecture. Whether we work, relax, watch, eat, sleep, or talk to each other, sitting is at the core of our relationship to buildings.”

“SEAT” is an installation in Atlanta’s Freedom Park produced by E/B Office (Ju Lee and Brian Brush). The piece involves 400 chairs assembled in a sine wave formation “drawn into an agitated vortex rising from the ground.”

The “SEAT” pavilion was organized in part by Flux Projects, an Atlanta based public arts organization. (via)

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Louis Jacinto’s Photographs Of Floating Signage

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Louis Jacinto - Photography
Louis Jacinto‘s series “Floating Away” is at once alien and familiar, like Norman Rockwell from space. His photographs are of the most mundane objects we see every day in our lives: signs, usually connected to buildings and rooftops, drifting away. One photograph features a water tower, suspended in mid-air like a Midwestern siren call. Unmoored from their surroundings, the objects seem to contain some kind of portent, like a surreal rapture of modern design.

Jacinto’s photographs of big company logos are particularly evocative; devoid of branding, advertisements and the adoring gaze of consumers, they seem almost lonely. There’s a nostalgia to Jacinto’s photographs. They’re haunted by ghosts of icons from the past.

According to a statement by the artist,
“I expected so much growing up in the 1960s. My home always included discussions of the day’s events and politics. I saw how people struggled, fought and died for what was right. I thought by the time I was grown, the world was going to be beautiful and wonderful. I see we are still getting it backwards. I do everything I can so that my own ideals don’t float away.”
You can see more at Jacinto’s website here. (via I Need a Guide)

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Bionic Bodies: Fashion Brand Chromat Scaffolds The Body Using Architectural Theory And Robotics

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Designer Becca McCharen is the creative brain behind Chromat, a NYC fashion label that artfully merges fashion, design, architecture and — more recently — technology. Chromat’s designs are more conceptual than practical, but still beautiful and wearable: steel dresses, caged masks, and coiled skirts are but a few examples from the label’s fascinating repertoire. Driving Chromat’s unique look is McCharen’s background in architectural theory and urban design. During her studies in architecture at the University of Virginia, she became very interested in scaffolding and building exteriors, especially those whose structure or wiring was visible on the outside (Paris’ Centre Pompidou is one such example). Wanting to experiment with art, fashion, and human “architecture,” McCharen moved to NYC in 2010 and began her “structural experiments” for the body. (Source)

Caging, straps, and corset boning have always been integral to Chromat’s work, but for Autumn/Winter 2014, the design company introduced another element into the art/fashion/architecture triad: robotics. Their new line was called Bionic Bodies, inspired by a love story McCharen envisioned between a human and a robot. The result? Bodies scaffolded like bionic arms and exoskeletons, chromed ribcages studded at the seams, and, most strikingly, faces and bras illuminated with blue LEDs. When the lights are off, the cyborg effect of the LEDs is eerily sexy; have a look at Chromat’s runway video above and see for yourself.

What McCharen and the Chromat crew are creating is more than just experiments in fashion and architecture — their work is fascinating from a theoretical perspective, as well. Absorbed in our daily experiences and emotional lives, we forget that we are, in fact, bones wrapped in muscle and flesh, propelling ourselves through space by the miracle of physics. By engineering such structures on the outside of the body, Chromat celebrates such functionality and mechanical perfection. The parallel between structural facades and fashion is interesting, as well, if we understand fashion as a way to construct our identities and shift the way people interact with us. Like the exterior of powerful structures, Chromat’s revolutionary works exude strength, self-assurance, and impermeability — hence the eerie power and unsusceptible beauty of McCharen’s cyborgs.

Check out Chromat’s online store here. VICE conducted a fascinating interview with McCharen about her Bionic Bodies line. For a discussion of Chromat’s upcoming  Spring/Summer 2015 line, read The Glass Magazine’s article.

Credits: A big thank-you to photographer Koury Angelo, who let me share his incredible pictures from the MADE runway show.

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Joseph Leroux

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Joseph Leroux uses various materials (metal, paper, wire, found objects, etc) to create creepy looking sculpture and installations full of symbolism. Check out his series on body parts merged with machinery/ metal works.

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The Culture Of Thailand’s Ladyboys

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In Thailand, the term ladyboy is a nickname for transgender women, and they are a population often met with intolerance and prejudice. Their place in society is explored through photographer Soopakorn Srisakul’s series Mistress, in which he captures the daily life of his girlfriend and four other ladyboys. They all work at bars and as call girls in the infamous red-light Nana district in Bangkok.

Srisakul’s images are his journey in understanding his partner and the others experiences. There are few positions that are hiring transgendered women, so this community typically finds work in department stores, makeup counters, and cabaret venues. Those that are bargirls generally make better the better wages, which allows them to save up for gender reassignment surgeries.

Mistress presents us with poignant pictures of both work and home. There are moments of dark clubs, sure, but there are also quiet scenes in bright bedrooms. Srisakul writes:

They go out working, come back to their room, go relaxing outside, occasionally go back to visit family in the countryside, and then go to work. They, like anyone else, just try to get by. They laugh for joy, cry for sorrow, they work to earn a living, and they have an argument with their boyfriend, just like anyone else. In this sense, what makes them so different from us as to warrant a harsh treatment from the moral society, and do they deserve it at all? (Via Feature Shoot)

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Larry Carlson

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Dear “Psychedelic” Artists: It takes more than neon paint and a strategically placed black light to blow one’s mind. Just ask Larry Carlson, visionary multi media artist! I would describe Carlson’s work as Magritte and Dali’s love child if such a child were conceived after the advent of Photoshop. Beautiful yet jarring, welcoming yet otherworldly, Carlson’s work is a true feast for the eye.

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