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Worlds Smallest Sculptures Made With Help Of Microscopes

When it comes to his artwork Russian sculptor Nikolai Aldunin thinks big but works small. How small you ask? So small that you need a microscope just to see it! Inspired by a Russian tale about a craftsman so talented that he put a horseshoe on a flea Aldunin set off  to make the famous story a reality. After two years of preparations and three months of painstaking work he accomplished his mission only to realize that he had found his true calling in the world of microminiature arts! See Aldunin’s famous horseshoe on a flea sculpture and many other tiny pieces after the jump! (via)

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Sitting on the Fence with Sven Lamme

Sven Lamme seems to playfully sit on the fence, so to say, between art and design.  In collaboration with landscaper Terra Incognita, Lamme constructed these three “seating elements” throughout a nature preserve in the Netherlands.  They at once serve as kind of landmark for the natural surroundings as well as a means to passively interact with the environment.  Lamme also makes use of visual puns in the design of his seating elements.  The first seat a literal interpretation of sitting on the fence, and the third resembling a buoy – a reference to the lands elevation below sea level.

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Laura Laine Fashion Girls

Laura Laine turns traditional fashion illustration on its head with her uncanny figures and exquisitely detailed rendering.

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Pyanek Transforms Everyday Objects Into Unrecognizable Abstractions In His Macro Photography

Book pages by pyanek (AWWOW)

Kitchen Sponge by pyanek (AWWOW)

Teabag by pyanek (AWWOW)

Soap Bubbles by pyanek (AWWOW)

Capturing monumental beauty in the little things in life, artist Pyanek photographs captivating images of everyday objects up close and personal. In his series Amazing Worlds Within Our Worlds, he photographs ordinary objects like cornflakes, book pages, and soap foam. However, these seemingly mundane objects do not look so ordinary when they are taken in Pyanek’s close-up photography style. What was once a familiar object has now become unrecognizable through the artist’s lens. The images are zoomed up close, and dramatically cropped to the point of abstraction, with Pyanek referring to this technique as macro photography.

The incredible detail shown in this series goes beyond what the naked human eye can see. We are shown tiny worlds where a grain of white sugar appears to be a diamond and a kitchen sponge looks like a strand of DNA. These stunning photos reveal every texture and color in the commonplace objects that we overlook everyday. We are able to examine every fiber of the stalk of an apple or the page of a book. Pyanek reminds us to stop and notice the small things in this remarkably beautiful series. If you are hungry for an even more dramatic, striking photographs of ordinary objects magnified, than you are sure to love the video compilation of the series Amazing Worlds Within Our Worlds, which was edited and scored by the artist himself.

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Julien Pacaud

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French Illustrator Julien Pacaud is delightfuly eccentric; her works look as if they’ve been dreamed up by children after feasting on their yearly spoils of Halloween candy. (What? Your parents didn’t tell you sugar would give you nightmares?) I would be lying if I told you I had any idea what this soccer-chicken picture means, but I still find it incredibly amusing.

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Fay Ku

Gorgeous narrative drawings and watercolors by Brooklyn based artist Fay Ku.

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Lucas Mongiello’s Childhood Relics

French artist Lucas Mongiello invokes feelings of nostalgia with his 20/20. Are these simply childhood artifacts or a way to group and investigate yesteryears cultural relics that have shaped our generations thinking about  pop culture ?

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Fascinating Portraits Of Criminals Covered In Russian Prison Tattoos

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Tattoos, historically, have been on the bodies of sailors and prisoners. It’s only in relatively recent years that they’ve entered mainstream society and lost some of their negative social stigma. Arkady Bronnikov collected photographs of tattooed Russian prisoners between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s. The amount he obtained was massive – 918 images worth –  thanks to his position in the government. As a senior expert in criminalistics at the USSR Ministry of Internal Affairs for over 30 years, part of Bronnikov’s duties involved visiting correctional institutions of the Ural and Siberia regions. He interviewed, gathered information, and photographed convicts and their tattoos, which gradually helped him build this comprehensive archive.

The images were later acquired by FUEL, a London-based design group, in 2013. Some of the photographs and official police papers authored by Bronnikov from the Soviet period will be published by FUEL in two volumes, the first of which was just released. Now, they are part of a current exhibition titled FUEL present: Russian Criminal Tattoo Police Files at Grimaldi Gavin in London until November 22 of this year.

When these photos were taken, Bronnikov wasn’t concerned with composition or style. They were meant to act as a record and served a purely practical purpose. The gallery explains, “Their bodies display an unofficial history, told not just through tattoos, but also in scars and missing digits. Closer inspection only confirms our inability to comprehend the unimaginable lives of this previously unacknowledged caste.

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