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Korakrit Arunanondchai’s Black Light World

Korakrit Arunanondchai’s sculptures, paintings, and installations are full of radioactive color and 3d trickery.

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600_1228414846Gregory Jacobsen’s paintings give me a feeling akin to working at a gynecology clinic for several years.

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Anne Lemanski Creates Quirky Sculptures Of Postmodern Animals

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American artist Anne Lemanski creates quirky, conceptual sculptures of animals. She begins by creating a copper rod amateur which she then cuts, manipulates, and braises together to create what she refers to as a three dimensional line drawing. She then uses various materials, such as prints created from images of her own collages, leather, and vinyl. These works act as a further adaptation of her collage practice. Her sculpture aesthetic roots from images she has been familiar with for years. As the Alumna Artist-In-Residence at the McColl Center for Arts + Innocation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Anne Lemanski developed her practice between both her collage and sculptural elements, leading her to create her newest exhibition, Simulacra. As the artist moved between techniques of meditative cutting and pasting to the physicality of creating a structure, she began to realize that ultimately, despite the difference in the materiality of the work, what was creating was the simulation of animals. By creating a falsified “double” of something that is in fact real. Lemanski allows herself to enter the postmodern discourse of the notion of “simulacra,” a concept associated with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard. Within the philosopher’s work Simulacra and Simulation (1981), Baudrillard argues that by creating “copies,” society has replaced all meaning with mere symbols. Thus, the human experience has become hyper-real, as all meaning is just a simulation of what once was. Lemanski notes that her own practice replicates the same notion, as she creates the simulacrum of nature. She allows two dimensional imaging to become three dimensional. This process allows the viewer to then experience the simulated, while channeling the real.

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Artist Applies Paint Solvents To Photographs To Create Eerie And Surreal Images

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There is little to be found on mixed media artist Kuinexs, who claims this name as an identity and artform. For his “Photodissolutions,” the artist applies paints solvents to photographs, creating a chemical reaction that smears and blurs the colors in the photograph. The effect is at once haunting and a bit disturbing. Some of the elements of the original photograph peek through or remain untouched backgrounds to the dissolutions, presenting a jarring juxtaposition of realism and surrealism. The subjects in Kuinexs’ images are often obscured, and only the curves of faces and bodies and flesh-tone colors exist as evidence of a subject’s presence. (via juxtapoz)

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JAN KRIWOL Manipulates Reality

Young Polish photographer and pixel manipulator Jan Kriwol’s images defy reality and trick your senses to create dynamic images influenced by Kriwol’s urban surroundings.

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Bela Borsodi

It’s refreshing to see fashion photography that doesn’t look like your run of the mill fashion editorial. Bela Borsodi’s massive portfolio is full of playful and experimental photographs that walk the fine line between design, fashion, and art.

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Jenine Shereos Human Hair Leaves

 

In Jenine Shereos’ series Leaf the intricacies of a leaf’s veining are recreated by wrapping, stitching, and knotting together strands of human hair.  Inspired by the delicate and detailed venation of a leaf, Shereos began stitching individual strands of hair by hand into a water- soluble backing material. At each point where one strand of hair intersected another, she stitched a tiny knot, so that when the backing was dissolved, the entire piece was able to hold its form.

The complex network of lines present in this work mimics the organic patterns found in nature and speaks to the natural systems of transformation, growth and decay. Allusions to the vascular tissue of plants, as well as the vascular system of the human body, exist simultaneously; the delicate trace of a hair falling silently, imperceptibly, from one’s head becoming the veins of a leaf as it falls from a tree leaving its indelible imprint on the ground below. (via oddity central )

 

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Le Bestiaire Exhibition Encourages The Child In All Of Us To Play Dress Up

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The current Le Bestiaire exhibition on display at the Biennale internationale design de Saint Etienne 2015 in France is an adorable collection of grizzly monsters, creatures, critters, beasts and fiends. 14 different creatures of all shapes, sizes, colors and textures were dreamed up by a diverse bunch of artists including Studio Brichet Ziegler, Perrine Vigneron and Gilles Belley, Louise de Saint Angel, Anne Lutz, Joachim Jirou-Najou, Felipe Ribon, Les Graphiquants, Twice, Helkarava, Bonnefrite, Malika Favre, Amélie Fontaine, Leslie David and Ionna Vautrin.

In a workshop inspired by the animals in the exhibition, kids are asked to imagine themselves as a make-believe beast. A project created by Amélie Doistau and Tomöe Sugiura, the different monsters have forms, colors and patterns from actual, real life animals.

The exhibition asks us to think what it means to wear a costume, to don a disguise and to have the opportunity to act out of character.

When we dress up, regardless of whether we become beautiful or ugly, good or bad, marvelous or monstrous, everyone gets into character and is excused of all odd behavior, without being subject to ridicule. The animal kingdom is amazing and rouses the imaginations of young and old alike. Many designers have explored the world of childhood through this unifying theme. They transform everyday objects referencing zoological world. Could it be the desire to tame wild animals that propels designers to represent fierce creatures as docile pets? (Source)

If you get the chance, be sure to check it out for yourself, and you can ponder these questions further. Le Bestiaire runs from March 12 until April 12, 2015.
(Via Pattern Pulp)

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