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Soon Agency Creates Creepy Crawly Bugs From Recycled Magazines

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To promote a new line of recycled paper, the creative ad-agency Soon made these fantastic sculptures of bugs. The bugs are inventive in form and colour, but are still recognizable as beetles, bees, dragonflies, and other species of insect. The wings are meticulously cut out to imitate the texture of real wings, but without the thin film that would allow them to fly. The sculptures really are all about texture. One that looks like it could be a fly has the texture of a fly’s eyes over the entirety of its body, and feelers that look like the filter-feeding system of a baleen whale.

It’s funny to see the “making of” video, because the bugs are as large as their creators’ hands. It’s entertaining to see the process of making the bugs. The video shows everyone at the agency sorting the papers by colour (even enlisting their children to help them), cutting the paper into different shapes or folding it like origami, and gluing it to create rather sturdy looking sculptures. It’s totally enjoyable to see such a collaborative effort to successful effect.

Soon also created flowers and other plants as a sort of habitat for the bugs. Using the habitat, they made a short film of the bugs flying around it, that is equal parts playful and funny. (Via Bizarre Beyond Belief)

 

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David A Smith

A short documentary by Danny Cooke, about one of the few remaining traditional UK glass artists, David A Smith.

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Fanny Bostrom

Franny Bostrom

Fanny Bostrom is a Swedish painter and illustrator currently working and residing in New York. I love her literature-appreciating kittens and the rough strokes she uses to paint.

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superheroes Placed In Iconic Images Of The Past

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Digital artist and graphic designer Kode Logic (aka Boss Logic) is used to taking existing imagery and adapting, changing and repurposing it. With his newest series, Playing With History, the Melbourne, Australia artist samples some of the most recognizable photos in the history of the medium, and either subtly or blatantly alters them by including superheroes and villains.

Ranging from the construction workers who built New York’s skyscrapers palling around with Spiderman, or an alternate history where Mortal Kombat’s four-armed boss Goro menacingly watches over Ellis Island on the Statue of Liberty’s plinth, Kode Logic plays with both humor and irreverence (exemplified by two separate Kennedy edits – one with Marty McFly skitching on his hover-board, the other featuring The Watchmen’s The Comedian preparing to assassinate the president). Explaining the project (and a premise shared by many from the digital and web-based design and art communities), Kode Logic says, “…as a digital artist we are the new breed of artists and we are all trying to innovate our own style to be remembered and past on as a foundation you laid down…” (via albotas)

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Joey L. Captures The Strange And Familiar Halloween Costumes Of Brooklyn’s Trick-Or-Treaters

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At just 24 years old, Ontario-born and Brooklyn-based artist Joey L. boasts an impressive portfolio.  Renowned for his diverse collection of portraits ranging from well-known celebrities to tribes encountered during his travels in Ethiopia, his work demonstrates “proof of an artist equally comfortable with the familiar and the exotic.”  In his annual “Halloween in Brooklyn” series, Joey L. documents the familiar—locals in Bushwick, Brooklyn—as they don their halloween costumes and transform into a different kind of exotic.

Capturing masquerading adults and trick-or-treating children alike, Joey began this series as a way to “view this local annual tradition through the eyes of a foreigner.”  Having heavily traveled and, thus, experienced the unfamiliarity of other cultures’ festivals and celebrations, Joey sought to engage with Halloween in a unique way.  Shooting each image in dreamy black and white and setting most of his subjects against a solid, black background, the eerie photographs are simultaneously dripping with drama and laced with playfulness—achieving the photograph’s objective to get “lost in a childish sugar rush of both home-made and store-bought pop-culture costumes of the year.”

Get into the Halloween spirit by checking out Joey L’s entire “Halloween in Brooklyn” series!

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The Year In Pictures Part: 3

In this post, featuring images from the last quarter of 2011, we remember a tumultuous year of change across the globe, the capture of Khadafi, the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, the passing of Apple icon Steve Jobs, fire, famine, flood and protests. A memorable year, indeed. — Paula Nelson (via Boston Globe)

National Transitional Council fighters fire against Muammar Khadafi troops in the town of Sirte, Oct. 10, 2011, as they move in against the strongman’s remaining diehards. (Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images)

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CHELSEA DIRCK


Chelsea Dirck is an art student majoring in Art Education and Fibers at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, Massachusetts. I met her through the DIY punk scene five years ago, and her drawings are still resonant with the energy, sincerity, and immediacy of that time period. Dirck’s artwork is often derived from her innumerable personal journals, some of which have recently been released as zines. These zines are full of emotive jottings and ink drawings that are paired with humorous or poignant words and slogans – oftentimes directly referring to Dirck’s personal life. The drawings in her zines are influenced by such disparate quarters as advertising, comics, Internet memes, David Shrigley’s drawings, the book More Things Like This, and other forms of text and image combination – which seems to be the predominant mode of expression for us “Millennials.”

Dirck’s journal-based artwork seems almost tailor-made for Internet distribution through sites like Tumblr, where she has cultivated a sizable following. However, she has recently expanded her art practice to include mediums where physicality is a central concern: embroidery, quilt-making, and large-scale drawings. With an upcoming show this spring at MassArt and an ongoing relationship with the Boston gallery Lincoln Arts Project, Dirck seems to be coming into her own – just in time for her 24th birthday, which, by the way, is today. So go do some celebratory pillaging of her Etsy for prints, originals drawings, postcards, and zines of many of the images found after the jump.

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Donna J. Wan’s Haunting Photos Of Suicide Destinations

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Photographer Donna J. Wan’s ongoing series “Death Wooed Us” is gorgeous, unsettling, and deeply empathetic. “In 2011 after the birth of my daughter I developed a severe case of postpartum depression and considered taking my own life,” she writes in the description of the work, all photos taken in “suicide destinations”—places where people have taken their lives.

“Using research gathered from media reports, I found several locations in the Bay Area and travelled to them. I walked along the paths taken by these people before they ended their lives. Most of these photographs were taken from bridges, including the Golden Gate Bridge, one of the most well-known ‘suicide destinations,’ but also lesser-known beaches and overlooks. I purposely photographed from the perspective of looking up at the sky, down at the water or crags, or straight ahead but far away, thinking that these views might have resembled the ones seen by others moments before dying. Many of my images have a hazy and elusive quality, which I believe reflects the clouded state of mind of the suicidal.”

Suicide is such a sensitive subject. There are many people—probably the majority of people—who cannot imagine losing the will to live. Whether because of religious beliefs, or ties to family and friends, or just the innate need to stay alive, these people believe that they would never end their own lives. Then there are others, who have lived with pain and grief and the loss of hope. Those who, because of sickness of body or brain, struggle through every day. Once you have crossed this line, between life at all costs and death as a merciful end, the world never looks the same to you again. In Wan’s series, her experience is what makes the photos haunting and peaceful. She has looked into the cracks of her own soul, and that has enabled her to walk in the footsteps of those without hope and capture their last sights with kindness. The last view of a suicidal person could be macabre, an intrusion into someone else’s pain. These photos offer beauty, the acknowledgement of despair, and the desire for peace.

“There are some who may think that my photographs romanticize these places of death. I can understand that point of view, although that is not my intention. Death is not beautiful – in fact, jumping from a bridge 200 feet high is a very painful and violent way to die. Yet the sublimity of these places continues to lure people to them. I do not intend for my work to glorify the allure of these places. Instead, I hope that it may offer a glimpse into the minds of those who may have thought that dying by these beautiful places was a peaceful way to end their suffering.”

(via feature shoot)

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