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Saurabha Datta Has Developed A Device That Can Teach Anyone How To Draw

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A designer/civil engineer named Saurabha Datta has developed a prototype for a device that can teach you how to draw. The machine aptly named “Teacher”, wraps around your hand and guides it to the perfect line.  The project developed for Datta’s thesis at Copenhagen’s Institute Of Interactive Design, first came about when he made a series of devices that guided people through simple tasks such as hitting a few piano keys or drawing a geometrically correct shape. The breakthrough in Datta’s research is taking a concept once thought of as sci-fi fodder and bringing it into reality.

“Teacher” looks similar to the old lie detector tests that would record a person’s pulse rate when asked a series of intimidating questions. It doesn’t say how heavy it is or what the projected weight would be but to be successful it would have to be lightweight. Some of the other projects Datta has worked on include making an interactive car seat that can respond to your insecurities and a program called “moment” which records your feelings at different times of the day.

Machines and computers are known as aids in making our lives easier and less stressful. With this latest development we can witness their evolution as was predicted some 50 years ago in Stanley Kurbrick’s 2001 a space odyssey. Who can forget the calm voiced computer “Hal” who eventually takes over the ship and responds with emotional vengeance against the crew when it learns they were going to “disconnect him.” If they can teach people how to draw what could be next on the horizon? Teaching you how to be a neurosurgeon or a concert pianist? Only time will tell. (via Juxtapoz)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Baltimore Clap

Follow a hapless little chap on a terrifying journey through a cavernous clap factory.

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Plain Air

Los Angeles-based Apenest, a publishing/ printmaking project created by Cody Hoyt and Brian Willmont, presents Plain Air. Plain Air is the second in their series of exhibitions focused on showcasing talented emerging artists at Cinders Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. Plain Air is running from Oct 15th – Nov 14th, so if you’re in the neighborhood don’t miss out!

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Breathtakingly Ephemeral Portraits Created With Flowers And Seeds

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When vegetal artist Duy Anh Nhan Duc and photographer Isabelle Chapuis collaborate, the resulting images of people and flowers are anything but cliché. The series “Etamine” (stamen) and “Dandelion” are elegant and surreal, beautifully conceptual and expertly shot.

In “Etamine” a somewhat androgynous man is adorned in black and red and purple and yellow. “Fragile compositions of thousands of petals: carnations, anemones, irises and chrysanthemums merge with the skin.” The petals resemble feathers, as if these are sensual and captivating birds preening for the camera.

“Duy Anh Nhan Duc is an artist who handles vegetal art in a very singular way.… He merges plants with human bodies, integrates them with objects, combines them with his drawings or stages them though his short-films. Through his work, he weaves a poetic world where plants rule as masters.”

Like its seed head, “Dandelion” feels more fragile, suspended in time, as if the female model is holding her breath. Shot against a black background, the dandelion seeds are as impossibly delicate as snow or fog. Where in “Etamine” the petals have merged with the male figure, the seeds in “Dandelion” are ephemeral, pausing for a moment before floating away on a breath or a breeze.

Chapuis says, “I’m very inspired by the aesthetic movement in painting, Tim Walker. C’est l’art pour l’art. Art for its own sake. It’s only about emotion. I don’t want to accomplish anything beyond appealing to peoples’ senses”. (Source)

These series are proof of the magic that can happen when two extremely talented artists combine forces to make captivating work. (Via Ignant)

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Jean-François Lepage Unconventional Fashion Photography

Jean-François Lepage’s fashion photography has a mysteriously surreal feel that you don’t usually find in fashion photographs. With complex non-traditional sets, makeup that is more often seen in horror films, and hand drawn line drawings directly on the photos surface, Lepage creates a world that lies at the intersection of art, film stills, theater, and fashion. (via bumbumbum)

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Martin Feijoo Makes Fun Drawings Based On What Images He Sees In The Clouds

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Martin Feijoo’s drawings are inspired by what he imagines the clouds in the sky to look like. His blog offers an image of his own artwork alone, as well as a comparison between the original photograph of the clouds. It’s fun, if you can manage not to peak, to look at the clouds first and see what you see before looking at Faijoo’s images. His style is illustrative and bold, which helps to see his images quite clearly in the clouds on their own. He might pursue more play between the cloud and his image as he continues with this series, to blur the lines more between reality and his imagination.

Feijoo speaks about his inspiration to start the series on his website:

When I was a child I was told that clouds’ shapes were created by expert balloon twister clowns who live in the sky, so that they can keep entertaining children. On my last trip to Mexico I remembered this and I started to photograph clouds on the road. The result is Shaping Clouds, a series of illustrations where I drew the first thing that came into my mind when I saw these clouds that I imagine someone made for me.

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Vegan Taxidermist’s Beautiful Creations Pose Ethical Questions

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As a child, the vegan taxidermist Nicola Jayne Hebson wandered the Blackburn, England countryside, the sight of dead animals haunting her memory long after she returned home. The indignity of remains left to rot struck a chord in her, and she finally took a pair of mating, deceased frogs home, gently placing them in a frame, forever bound mid-coitus.

The artist, now 23, taught herself taxidermy, using only roadkill and deceased pets. The decision to use any living or once-living creature for the sake of art raises ethical questions, but Hebson hopes that debate over her work will inspire viewers to consider the ethics of the meat industry.

Ultimately, Hebson’s work reads as an emphatic attempt to reanimate a being that no longer exists, and it that sense it does—perhaps unfairly— claim nonhuman remains as an expression of the inherently human will to be remembered after death. But in this case, the work itself is so painstakingly delicate that it feels surprisingly generous; her careful craft isn’t a boastful display of her own ability; instead, it recalls ancient mummifications or ritualistic burial practices.

Her creations exude a life-like pathos uncommon in taxidermy in part because of her paradoxical choice to rely upon fantasy over strict realism, appealing to a more emotionally heightened realm of poetry and make-believe. One rat appears to lay a loved one to rest, and the viewer is seduced into mournfulness, forgetting for a brief moment that both rats are in fact dead. Other, more surreal creatures exist within what we might imagine to be a sort of afterlife; her seven-headed rat quietly recalls the biblical Book of Revelations.

Hebson’s creations are dizzyingly anachronistic, seeming to draw inspiration from anywhere between the Medieval Gothic period to the Victorian age. Unified only in their deaths, her works speak across generations and inspire us to mourn for those we so often forget. (via BUST and VICE)

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Gianluca Traina Uses Distorted Photos To Create Woven Pixelated Busts

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Artist Gianluca Traina’s series titled Portrait 360 combines photography and sculpture to create alluring, mysterious objects. Mannequin-esque heads are covered in distorted, mosaic-looking squares that are simultaneously recognizable humans yet pixelated and indiscernible. To craft these works, Traina first shoots photos of anonymous subjects and focuses on their faces. He then uses a warp and weft technique to weave the 2D-images into 3D paper busts.

In the blurred surface photos, you can tell where the skin ends and the hair begins, as well as where features like the eyes and nose are. But, those things don’t always match up with the attributes of a bust. Eyes are on the back of the head and hair covers the nose and mouth. There’s no front or back anymore, and instead there’s a constant play between photographed surface and the sculpted one. (Via Hi Fructose)

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