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Bill Durgin

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Bill Durgin‘s “Figure Studies” explores the human torso as an abstract form. He often takes inspiration from dance and other performers to capture images of the human body, (sans limbs and heads), as if their skeletons had lost their rigidity and become part of their skin, fat, and flesh. Durgin would demonstrate different poses he took away from performances and ask his models to imitate them – a lot of these guys must be yoga ninjas.

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Chiharu Shiota

Chiharu Shiota, Installation

Chiharu Shiota‘s installations have the power to generate a surreal and almost dreamlike environment. Using a combination of items, the artist has created works that range from floating beds and a window tower to objects prisoners in a nest of thread.

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Can Pekdemir’s Surreal (And Hirsute) Figures Are Strange Creatures Of Fiction

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Conceptual artist Can Pedekmir creates digital portraits of imaginary creatures. According to the bio on his website, he works on the “deformation of human and animal body using various methodologies,” one of which he lists as applying “mathematical equations.” Other methodologies seem to include using hair. Lots of hair.

Pekdemir’s portraits are in stark black and white and appear like artifacts from an alternate dimension. His subjects are creatures with no distinguishable features; instead, their faces and entire heads are coiffed, tangled masses of hair and other biomatter. The result looks something like Where the Wild Things Are by way of Edward Gorey. Alternatively, it’s as though an entire forest undergrowth developed sentience and decided to pose for some erstwhile photographer.

Pekdemir’s work was featured most recently at the Unseen Photo Fair in Amsterdam, which ended late last month. He’s listed as a photographer, which only serves to highlight the eerie surreal quality of his art. Part photography and part elaborate fiction, his work blurs the lines between what is and what could be. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Ei Ka

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Eibatova Karina a.k.a Ei Ka is an illustrator based in Moscow, Russia. I love her creative typography and her illustration skills. She also does photography! The well trained lines and subtle color is what makes me fall in love with her work.

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Jessica Eaton

Jessica Eaton

 

Jessica Eaton experiments with color, using it either sparingly, oddly (hue-wise) or in splashes. She uses geometric shapes, as well natural, turning simple things like circles and forests into something otherworldly.

 

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Preview: Desi Santiago at envoy enterprises NYC

 

Desi Santiago recently opened a solo show at envoy enterprises’ 87 Rivington St. NYC. The show includes sculpture, installation, and video works in “an enigmatic environment fluctuating between the realms of seduction and mourning”. Robotic skulls with chattering dentures,  glowing pentagrams, and masks cast from the artist’s face are a few of the things you will find in the space’s first floor and basement. This looks really good and should not be missed. Click past the jump to see more of what you can expect from the show, which is entitled This Pop is Perfection.

All images courtesy of the artist and envoy enterprises, New York.

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Lenka Clayton’s Sculpture Project – You’ve Never Seen Shoes Like This Before

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One Brown Shoe Project - Sculpture

In 2013, conceptual artist Lenka Clayton created the “One Brown Shoe” project, in which she instructed participants to make a single brown shoe using materials found in their homes. The participants were 100 married couples that spanned 12 countries. They were asked to not discuss the project with their partners, and to construct their shoes in secret. Once each person completed their brown shoe, they could then share it with their spouse.

The type of shoes and materials used runs the gamut. Brown shoes were made from packing tape, knitting, animal crackers, corks, teddy bears, and much more. Materials were both conventional and innovative. One artist, for instance, made a stiletto heel from a nail. Another made use of a nest and quail egg. Some people used actual shoes, which seems like cheating (it isn’t). Despite living in the same household, no couple used the exact same supplies. Size of shoe was also noticeable; Some of them were meant for giants, while other babies.

In writing about the project, Clayton muses, “…each pair of shoes might be seen as a portrait – of two individuals, of one couple, and of the difference between the two.” It shows the artistic differences between the pair, as well as their individual ingenuity and knowledge of materials.

The fact that the shoe-making was in secret was the key to making this project successful. If they hadn’t, I don’t think these shoes would be as interesting. They might look forced, like they were trying (or not trying) to replicate their partner. One Brown Shoe allowed the participants to create freely without criticism. The eventual reveal of the two shoes, which are often very different from one another, is both amusing and telling. When left to their own devices, it’s fascinating to see how two people who share a life together would create something that is so alike or so different. (Via Junk Culture)

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Jamie Salmon

Jamie Salmon’s hyper realistic sculpture capture every wrinkle, vein, and hair with uncanny realism and attention to detail.

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