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Christopher Saunders’ Ominous Landscape Paintings

Christopher Saunders lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His paintings are gloomy, atmospheric, and mesmerizing. In his own words: “My recent landscape paintings are primarily built around the cloud symbol as a depiction of event, at once internal, experiential and representational. The parameters for these events are of place rather than site and suggest the apocalyptic and contemplative sublime. The clouds depicted do not reference a specific photograph but are aggregated forms generated from a multi-source photographic index. Each cloud composition is derived from a collage method which conflates images of sky, pollution, smoke, explosions, plumes, swarms, and overexposed film. Additionally, the convention of field (plane) is employed to frame and stage these lurching deformations. Compositionally, field assumes the dual role of ground (rural and urban) and atmosphere (color and light). The image value of cloud (as event) lies within its openness, its internal dynamism, and the scope of the imaginary variations to which it lends itself. Thus field and cloud collide, collude, overlap and unfold along the horizon line of precipice. These are dramas of transition, a landscape on the move where there is no contradiction between the limitless of becoming and the singularity of the event.” (Via)

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Ryan Bradley’s Butterfly Effect


Ryan Bradley’s large, intricately composed pastel paintings of attractive female faces are seductive.  The delicate paintings are “unfixed,” which means the pastel is left loose.  This creates a surface similar to butterfly wings.  If you touched the paintings, some would rub off onto your hands.  I can’t help but think there is some relationship between the fragility of the surface and the portraits’ beauty.  Like the really ripe moment when someone is at the tops of their looks, you know it can’t last, but you can look away either.

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Happy Halloween

This video is complete nonsense but I’m amused. This kid is creative!

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Graffiti Artists Paint A 15,000 Square Foot Mural On The Walls Of A Swiss Prison

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Sixteen graffiti artists painted over 4500 square meters of a Swiss prison throughout an eighteen month period. Their work spanned exercise yards, corridors, stairwells, and the extensive outside wall, which alone would use around 1000 spray paint cans. The project began as a sort of celebration of graffiti as a unique art style as well as a desire to bring the artists’ work into a new environment with a challenge of large walls. Besides pushing personal boundaries of creating work on such a grand scale, the artists wanted to change the atmosphere of the prison. Their project would turn a cold, banal, uncomfortable setting into a warmer space for both prisoners and staff. The duration of creating the paintings was equally matched by the amount of planning and concept creating needed to span such a large space and find harmony between sixteen different artistic styles. The physicality and planning, however, were not the only difficult tasks: the artists were met with an emotional challenge as well. Despite knowing they we not confined, they were still consistently aware of their setting and were given a mere glimpse of what it is like on the inside. For example, they needed to call guards to be let out of the space and were daily witnesses to the day to day tension that exist within a prison.

Artists include Malik, Claude “Note” Lüthi, Robert Proch, Onur, Mizzo, Ti, Lain, Ata “Toast” Bosaci, Huran “Shark” Dogan, Daniel Zeltner, Sarah Parsons, Nevercrew (Pablo Togni and Cristian Rebecchi), Benjamin Solt, David Monllar, and Chromeo

A book, titled 4661m2: Art in Prison, has been published about the project to allow the public access to the locked up work. The book also hopes to inspire similar projects.

For more information, check out the projects website here.

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Pure Color Glows In Fog Installation

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Some of Ann Veronica Janssens‘ work is clearly and singularly about color.  For a number of her installations, Janssens’ uses a color film that transforms the light shining through it.  She then fills the space with an artificial fog which seems to glow with color.  The fog acts as a vehicle to carry the light and spread it into the air of the space; a way to experience color and only color.  There is no depth, texture, or line but just color and its saturation.  The installations create a dreamy atmosphere when any medium between color and the eye seems to disappear.

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Abstract, Subtract, Retract With Todd Chilton


Plenty of nice geometric abstractions on Todd Chilton’s portfolio site. Geometric abstractions can sometimes be a bore but Todd manages to get it right with his playful paint handling and the occasional drip of paint.

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Rob Simons

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Grainy, dreamlike images from Rob Simons. In addition to being a photographer, he also had a collection of his stories, Things Kept Burning, published in September 2006. He also collaborated with German director Werner Herzog on the script for Rescue Dawn. He also used to be an English Professor at Cosumnes River College in Sacramento. Basically, he’s pretty talented.

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This Is What Humans Looked Like 30,000 Years Ago

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The Paris-based sculptor Elisabeth Daynès listens to bones, to the remains of our evolutionary ancestors that have lived up to three million years ago. Throughout her prolific 20 year career, the “paleoartist” has worked from the skulls of wooly mammoths to species of hominid to create vividly detailed figures. Based on 18 data points that mark the bone, she can use a computer to model facial features that she later shapes out of clay. She refers to research and other bone samples to determine the build of her subjects, and ultimately she creates a silicone cast, complete with delicate painted features: veins, goosebumps, blemishes.

In a final step towards humanizing her sculptures, Daynès includes prosthetic eyes, teeth, and hair, each of which is as historically and scientifically accurate as possible. Current research suggests that Neanderthals, for example, had red hair; for her uncanny hominids, that range from Homo sapien to Homo erectus, she uses a blend of human hair. In her mind’s eye, the artist draws an informed portrait of each subject she reanimates; from the bones, she can determine period, sex and age, along with finer details like culture, climate, diet, and health.

For Daynès, this process is as much an art as it is a science. Ultimately, she hopes to reconnect with our past, embarking on a forensic search of what makes us human. Dismayed by the ways in which early human ancestors are reviled as unintelligent brutes, she injects her creations with a powerful dose of humanity; their brows furrow with concentration, and their eyes are painfully gentle. She explains “missing” them when they leave her studio for a permanent home in a museum. Take a look. (via Daily Mail and Lost at E Minor)

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