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Brian Cooper’s Trompe L’oeil Paintings

Los Angeles based artist Brian Cooper’s paintings look like the supply room of a crazed woodworker who has piled building materials from floor to ceiling. Employing  trompe l’oeil techniques that dazzle the eye these maze-like piles of wood, debris, tape, and other building materials are chipped away at, cut, torn, ripped, and gnawed at to reveal secret messages and Coopers personal arsenal of hieroglyphics.

“I make paintings that struggle with their function as devices for transcendent harmony. They do their job while acknowledging the disorder and uncertainty from which they come.”

When Cooper isn’t busy in the painting studio making beautiful paintings he is creating supersonic sounds with his band Earth Like Planets. Watch his latest music video for ELP after the jump.

 

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Max Lamb’s Artistic Process Involves Pouring Molten Pewter Into Sand . You Won’t Believe What Happens Next

max lamb

max lamb

An excavation artist, if there ever was such a thing, Max Lamb creates beautiful works of art and furniture using Mother Nature as one of his tools.  On a beach in Cornwall, England, Lamb uses primitive sand casting techniques to make his pieces. One of the earliest forms of casting, sand casting requires low-tech materials and systems.  Attracted to this method, Lamb employed this simple technique to create the pewter stool depicted in the video.  His knowledge of techniques, materials and his skill allow Lamb to explore method and medium in a unique way.  There is a sense of adventure to Lamb’s work, which makes his process as interesting as the final product itself.  His practice consists of an artistic honesty and respect for process that induces excitement and surprise.  Watching Lamb excavate his pewter creation from the sand evokes a sense of wonder and an awareness of magic.

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Suit Made Out Of Human Hair, Teeth, Eyes, And Bones

Fantich & Young is the creative partnership of artists Mariana Fantich and Dominic Young, who have been working together since 2008. In their series Apex Predator (meaning a predator with no predator of their own), they imagine the world’s toughest animal, and attempt to dress it. They created a suit and two pairs of shoes using natural materials that the Apex Predator could have gathered from his prey; a grotesque but awesome display of power. The suit is covered with human hair, with glass eyes and small bones for buttons. The collar is lined with dentures. The artists created two pairs of shoes to match the suit: oxfords and high heels, both lined with dentures (the thought of standing on teeth gives me goosebumps!!). This is a true power suit, designed for the cold-blooded animal who has fought their way to the very top of the food chain. The fact that this suit is designed to fit the human form is a clear indication of who the artists think that animal is…

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Tim Flach’s incredible Photographs of Dogs

Everyone love a cute photo of a dog but London based Tim Flach’s dog photographs show mans best friend in a completely new light. Bringing the viewer into close-up proximity with their animal subjects, painstakingly lit, carefully cropped for maximum graphic impact and animated by telling gestures, these photographs place us in an intimate relationship with their protagonists. They are far removed from wildlife photography’s documentary images of animals observed in their natural habitat. In fact, the treatment accorded to these particular creatures is not dissimilar from close encounters with individuals that are the stuff of human portraiture.

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Stephen Wilkes’ Cleverly Captures The Transition From Day To Night In One Photograph

Presidential Inauguration, Washington, D.C.

Presidential Inauguration, Washington, D.C.

Wrigley Field, Chicago

Wrigley Field, Chicago

Santa Monica Pier, California

Santa Monica Pier, California

Western Wall, Jerusalem

Western Wall, Jerusalem

Stephen Wilkes‘ “Day to Night” series captures the day-to-night transitions that occur in familiar cityscapes. Each image represents a collection of moments, not just a singular moment in time. About 50 photographs out of around 1,500 shots taken over the course of 12-15 hours comprise each single resulting photograph. During his shoots, Wilkes doesn’t allow himself bathroom breaks and when he eats, he eats meals brought to him in a bucket because it’s imperative that the photographer pay careful attention to the emptiness or potential overlaps of each shot. Wilkes’ composite photographs document movements within the same space from sunrise to sunset, each image capturing the transitions these spaces undergo on a daily basis.

For Time, Wilkes offers a descriptive caption of many images. Of his Wrigley Field photograph he explains, “This photograph was taken during the course of a Day/Night double header, a rare occurrence these days in major league baseball. Wrigley Field is the Grand Temple of baseball parks. It will change dramatically within the next year, as large jumbotrons will be installed into the stadium, forever changing this view. While the morning was sunny and clear, the afternoon made for a real challenge photographically. We had rain showers on and off throughout the day, and into the evening.”

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Erik Sommer’s Cement Paintings

These textural paintings by Erik Sommer are created using cement. Let’s hope he doesn’t have a twenty pound concrete business card too.

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Slovenian Honeycomb Architecture

Slovenian architecture firm OFIS won an architecture competition for low cost tiny tourist housing with their honeycomb-inspired design. If urban population density keeps rising, which it should and will (fingers crossed), this is the future! Once you’re done with the honeycombs, check out their other projects, they’re wild! (via)

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Artist Interview: Anoka Faruqee’s Optical Paintings Will Twist And Bend Your Perception

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-07, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-21, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-06, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

When walking towards a painting by Anoka Faruqee your eyes refuse to settle.  Turquoise, formed into an elongated triangular band, is pinched between two golden curves.  The turquoise is misbehaving.  Instead of sitting still it appears to flex and blend into the yellow.  As you get closer the painting changes, and at arm’s length another dramatic shift occurs, the previous turquoise and gold bands of color atomizes into narrow, serpentine, overlapping lines with several more colors, no longer just turquoise and gold.  Looking across the room your eyes settle on another painting.  This square shaped canvas is a warm gray that seems to dance.  Upon closer inspection the pleasantly worked surface transforms into a swirling design of forest green and cherry red lines.  Faruqee calls this series of paintings the Moiré series, after the illusion with the same name.  The history of Modern art is often told as a race towards extremes, but will that be true of 21st century art?  Anoka Faruqee’s work seems to place less emphasis on ‘pureness’ than other abstraction.  Faruqee’s work suggests that we can be more complex, and where artists over the past sixty years searched for the strongest statement, maybe our searches will lead in different, more nuanced directions.   

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