Get Social:

Todd Baxter’s Stylishly Retro Sci-Fi Utopias

baxter

baxter3

baxter5

baxter10

Multimedia artist Todd Baxter has created a retro futuristic image series inspired by narratives of science fiction utopia. Long fascinated with the technology and physics of the Space Race era, with “Project Astoria: Test 01,” Baxter tells a story that revolves around the experiences of children growing up in a an Earth-like world that has recently been colonized. Baxter’s wife, Aubrey Videtto, is writing the story that the two created together. They hope to collaborate with other artists for the project, including a graphic novelist and musician, to further execute their concepts and designs.  Of this project, Baxter writes, “With Project Astoria, I wanted to play with that childlike hopefulness — that anticipation of humans finally mastering our existence and our technology. Especially as we were reaching such new and magical realities as landing on the moon, the late 60s was the perfect period, in my mind, to add in this alternate history where we all get together and say, ‘Hey! We could go colonize this other Earth-like place and really do it right this time. It could be perfect. Utopia!’ Of course, it doesn’t go perfectly, which is good. Otherwise, it wouldn’t make for a very fun story.”

Baxter’s process is quite involved, but it starts with him pulling out sketches for ideas he’s had. He then browses the images on his computer for environment and landscape images he’s shot, and begins to weave together these environments with Photoshop. Baxter then plans the next elements based on these general compositions, producing photo shoots of his subjects that he continues to compose and retouch with Videtto until each image is fully realized. The result is a playful narrative with an almost kitschy aesthetic, evocative of the likes of Wes Anderson. (via behance and bleek magazine)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Eleanor Davies’ Giant Pom Pom Made With Over 200 Colors Is On Steroids

davies1 davies2 davies6 davies9

In artist Eleanor Davies’ piece titled Over 200 Beautiful Colors, she crafts a traditional yarn pom pom (like something you’d see on a beanie), but on steroids. Using wool, newspaper, and rope, Davies wraps donut-shaped discs with yarn and stacks them on top of one another. They become a mountain of wound wool, and finally she cuts the edges of every disc. This releases the fibers around the cardboard, and they form a larger-than-life ball of fringe.

The result of this tedious effort is something that you want to touch and maybe even hug. And, that’s Davies’ intention. She wants the viewer to desire an interaction with it. But, at the same time, she also wants to you to feel some sort of repulsion to it. Even though it’s a magnificent and incredible piece, you compare it to what other smaller, more perky-looking pom poms look like. This, in all its glory, droops as gravity has got the best of it. “The oscillation between attraction and repulsion is experienced through the disruption of taste values,” Davies writes in an artist statement. “Sculptures seek attention and flaunt themselves in such a way that they ask for it.”

The slow and meticulous construction of Over 200 Beautiful Colors is akin to a beautiful regime. Davies goes on to say:

In appropriating the sculpting techniques of hairdressing; extensions and highlights are added to slowly modify and enhance a sculpture’s look. The compulsive desire to reconfigure, reinvent, re-cut and re-colour is due to the satisfaction gained through succumbing to the lure of the surface. The process of overworking the sculptural surface is self indulgent and my practice embraces and revels in this.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

TYLER VIPOND Turns 2D To 3D

Londoner Tyler Vipond’s work plays mostly with space and depth created out of formerly 2D surfaces. Bridging the space between sculpture and painting, his work leaves you with a feeling of tension and intricacy while still feeling almost effortless. I particularly love his series “A Collapse” whose pieces are almost reminiscent of deconstructed origami.

Currently Trending

Francois Robert Juxtaposes Bones And Symbols Of Violence And War

symbols of war symbols of war

symbols of war

symbols of war

Human bones, any bones, are signifiers of death, decay- in more poetic terms- the ephemerality of life.

Photographer Francois Robert uses the powerful symbolism that accompanies human bones to create ‘Stop the Violence’ – an eerie but important series of photographs that juxtaposes bones and iconic words/symbols that in some way or another have generated deaths and violence (i.e wars, rifles, handguns, 9/11, knives, the KKK,etc)

In my photographs, I use the human skeleton as the formal visual element, the subject of the image. In this manner, the skeleton is both the protagonist and antagonist (the Buddhist notion about, “the duality of man” seems apt).

For each photograph, the artists dissembles and rearranges the bones in order to reconfigure the elements to form what you see here.

I intend the images to plant the notion of restraint and charity in an effort to promote peace and tolerance.

 

Currently Trending

Florenica Durante’s Electric Photos Wrap Her Subject In A Spectacle Of Energy

Zia-005 Final_o Zia-004 Final_o Zia-003 Final_o Ruso_Enveloped_RTux_Cropped

Photographer Florencia Durante’s series uses light to wrap her seated subject in a brilliant spectacle of energy.  It appears as fractured, gestural drawings that dances on the floor, up the bald man’s (named Ruso) legs and sometimes around his head or out the door. The white-yellow spirit is erratic and is chaotic.

In addition to having a drawn quality to them, these photographs are sculptural. Durante builds up form and by layering line upon line, taking into consideration the contour of the knees and the head. She creates a halo and a veil around her subject.

The light seems simultaneously helpful and terrifying. Ruso sometimes sits idly as it moves around and throughout him. Other times, he has his head in his hands waiting for impending doom.

Currently Trending

Lisa Swerllng’s Tiny People With Pubic Hair Make Bold Emotional Statements

d1135f30c4c10b7d1d584f5dbdfa50af

1

danceme_cu2_high

portrait_brightandbeautiful_cu_wp

huggingbed_cu_wp2

Trapped behind glass cases, the miniature human subjects of Lisa Swerllng’s Glass Cathedrals unabashedly perform daily rituals normally veiled from the outside world. The stunning pieces afford viewers with a whimsical type of voyeuristic indulgence. Like children before a set of dolls, we are invited to examine the many mundane moments that compose adult life, breathing life and meaning into each dollhouse-like setup with our own imaginations.

With its feet firmly planted in childlike curiosity, the series is unafraid to veer into tragic emotional spaces; caught staring into endless amounts of white space, many of the figures appear lonesome and fully aware of their smallness. A woman scrubs at a dizzyingly vast array of tired floors and walls, incapable of completing her work for her own tininess and permanently fixed position. Similarly, a man stares at his cow, a sole companion who does not return his gaze.

Though humorously seen, Swerling’s models are at times bitterly unaware. A group of people stand before a glass case containing the figure of a generic ghost labeled “god” with a sign stating, “In case of emergency break glass,” not noticing that they themselves are encased in glass, searching for meaning in the touchingly absurd. The viewer, in turn, is forced to face his or her burning existential yearnings within this magically adult dollhouse.

The idea of domesticity as it relates to femininity shines through in Swerling’s work in unexpected ways. A piece titled “A woman’s work is never done” features a woman sweeping pink glitter, erasing the suggestion of the usual portrayal of the home as unfulfilling; here and in a piece that features a woman serving dinner at the head of the table, glitter serves as a surprising and ecstatic symbol of female self-actualization. From the woman who examines herself before a mirror to an unwaxed redhead standing nude before circle of nuns, Swarling’s women embrace their activities unabashedly.

Hitting poignant notes that remind us of the power that lies beneath human smallness, isolation, connection, and actively defined identities, Glass Cathedrals serves as an alter at which we may worship our own condition. (via Foodie Bugle, Catto Gallery, and Lost At E Minor)

Currently Trending

Jonathan Latiano’s Scientifically Inspired Installations

LatianoInstallation

LatianoInstallation6

LatianoInstallation12

As a child, Jonathan Latiano found his artistic inspiration in the displays and dioramas at the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences. Latiano uses his understanding of biology, astronomy, physics and geology as starting points for the creation of his work and the way he contextualizes his physical world. Created with a variety of materials, his work evokes tensions of temporality and permanence, physicality and ephemerality, destruction and creation, stasis and kinesis, and fragility and strength. “I find the poeticism and concepts of the physics of our universe simultaneously fascinating, beautiful and horrifying. The pieces that I create contrast abstracted human intuition with the reality of our natural environment. I strive to emphasize the areas that exist in-between the boundaries of defined regions. My work, in many ways, is my own personal attempt to understand my place in the physical universe.”

Currently Trending

Jillian Ross

Jillian Ross, mixed media

Jillian Ross is a student at Ontario College of Art in Toronto majoring in drawing and painting. Her work is a mixture of digital media illustration, photo manipulation and a combination of mixed media elements in drawing and painting. I would also like to point out the artist’s fascination with wolves and mountains, as they become the main subjects throughout her work.

Currently Trending