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Jason Freeny’s Dissected Pop Culture Sculptures

Jason Freeny lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He has an ongoing series of sculptures that eschew the clean and safe demeanor of mainstream toys. From Barbie to Lego Figures, Freeny’s creations are dissected so that individual anatomy can be seen. The kitsch cuteness of a My Little Pony figure is immediately eradicated once the viewer takes in the bizarre skeletal structure on the opposite side. Jason finds a way to expose inherent creepiness in otherwise harmless characters that populate the pop culture landscape.

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Doug McAbee’s Fun Time Structures

Doug McAbee’s sculptures look like something Alexander Calder would make if he had a better sense of humor.

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Tim Lewis’ Mechanical Osterich Sculpture

 

British artist Tim Lewis’ Pony has an ostrich-like anatomy constructed from three mechanical arms, as athletically human as they are programmatically robotic. Like Jetsam, Pony appears as less animated object, more independent entity, moving across the floor towing an empty carriage, the ‘ostrich’ is autonomous rather than interactive. Born of mechanics in the same way that genetics engineers use science, Pony is a sculptural creature that is full of wonder with a creepy prehistoric robot feel. See more of Tim Lewis’ work after the jump.

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Watercolor Paintings of Imagined Epic Proportions

Rob Sato - Watercolors Rob Sato - WatercolorsRob Sato - WatercolorsRob Sato’s watercolor paintings are whimsical clashes of documented history and personal dreaming: a magpie pictorial narrative of his own internal processing system or as he says, an “extension of writing” and “sifting through garbage. Getting a lot of trash out of my head.” His ability to condense worlds, communities, and landscapes into one surreal solid depiction, interestingly enough, conceptually harkens back to Vincent VanGogh’s statement on the watercolor medium itself as “a splendid thing” to “express atmosphere and distance, so that the figure is surrounded by air and can breathe in it.”

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RAMMELLZEE’s Singular Visual Stylings

Recently deceased Hip Hop legend RAMMELLZEE was such an enigma. I often have a hard time deciphering some of his rhetoric. But his genius is so evident. His work (on any platform, vocal or visual) was always a cut above. He always had something slightly different going on. Take his “Letter Racers” (above), for example. Customized skateboard warriors fighting epic alphabet wars? Always on another level. See more from the late great artist after the jump, and listen to “Beat Bop”, the game-changing single that included cover art from Jean-Michel Basquiat.

All photos Copyright The Estate of Rammellzee, Courtesy the Suzanne Geiss Company, New York.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Jen Stark’s Cosmic Trips

These videos are a bit old but I thought you would enjoy these three trippy videos by cut paper artist Jen Stark.

Watch all three after the jump.

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Kate Moross

Kate Moross

Kate Moross is a designer/illustrator based in London. She specializes in design and art direction in the music industry. Her style and work stand out because her graphics and colors are always simple and bold. Also, I think she’s responsible for the increased popularity of the triangle (ever since she adopted it as her logo). Whether you want to thank her or smack her for that you can’t deny that she has built up quite an impressive body of work. whether it be in the form of a tote bag, music video or signature clothing line for Topshop, Moross designs have become ubiquitous.

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Tim Prince and his Forgotten Boneyard Recall Little Shop of Horrors

Forgotten Boneyard is the 100% real animal bone work of artist Tim Prince. In addition to the one-of-a-kind handcrafted creatures in bone, Prince offers a growing selection of wet specimens through Etsy. To me the real standout of the entire collection is Audrii muscipula (pictured above), an homage to Audrey II, the carnivorous plant from 1986’s Little Shop of Horrors made of mink vertebrae/scapula, box turtle shells, a skunk skull, coyote teeth, and raccoon mandibles. A mouse skull and other bones decorate the soil.  

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