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Nick Albertson’s Photographic Patterns Made From Mundane Objects

Nick Albertson lives and works in Chicago, IL. He meticulously organizes mundane household items such as straws, napkins, rubber bands, and coat hangers until they form a textural tapestry. He then photographs these geometric abstractions and presents them as elaborate patterns. His work reminds the viewer that everything is part of a bigger whole and that beauty can be found in all things.

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Michelle Mackinnon’s Photorealistic Portraits

Michelle MacKinnon‘s photorealistic portraits use the human face to investigate secrets and their relation to the idea of public/private. The artist explains:

“The series is a combination of a list of exposed secrets, and with no direct link to them, portraits of the sitters expressing their emotions/reactions to their listed secret. Provoked by the idea of confession, this series will explore the public/private relation of people and the exposition of their secrets. By anonymously submitting secrets to the artist and later posing for a portrait depicting their secret, this series strikes an interesting note of juxtaposition between the public and private sphere of secrecy. Publically, these secrets, and therefore their keepers, have been indirectly exposed. Out of instinctive human nature, curiosity drives the viewer to either intuitively match the portrait to their secret, or become empathetic to the portrait deriving from relation to their own secrets. Privately, the confession becomes an outlet for the sitter; a chance to formally acknowledge and confront their secret, yet knowing that, though it may be assumed, no one but themselves will be entirely accurate as to which secret is theirs. It becomes a veiled breach of the private into the public and a connection without fact; after all, we all have secrets.” – Michelle Mackinnon

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These Otherworldly Fungi Have To Be Seen To Be Believed

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The Australian-based photographer Steve Axford captures some mind-boggling fungi, including tropical mushrooms that had likely not been caught on film prior to these images. Compelled to adventure into obscure places left unexplored by most men, the artist documents strange organisms, many of which are found in his native area, the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales. A number of species exhibited in his body of work exist in more temperate zones, like Tasmania and the state of Victoria.

Axford, a retired computer system designer and manager, hopes to marry science and art. His photographs, in addition to being beautiful, are useful in the identification and cataloging of species previously undocumented. Prior to Axford’s efforts, the hairy mycena, a snowy white mushroom with a fuzzy cap and a translucent stem had not been spotted or archived in Australia. The same holds true for the blue leratiomyces, a plant native to New Caledonia and Lord Howe Island.

Seen here in striking detail are the most uncanny of fungi species, each enchanting in its own magical way. Some are bioluminescent, glowing an electric green in the night air; others are impossibly delicate, sprouting elegantly from moistened tree trucks. Unexpected colors spill into nature’s canvas with the growth of purple, blue, pink, and bright red mushrooms. The artist explains that photography has gifted him with the opportunity to slow down and absorb the earthly wonders that surround him; in shooting these strange, spindly lifeforms, he gives us the opportunity to do the same. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Richard Kelly

591a_1228065175-copy591b_1228065175Some nice photographs can be found on the Richard Kelly site. I personally like the above portraits best but a wide array of fashion and music photography can be found in his portfolio

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The Dark Wintery Wonderlands Inside Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz’s Snow Globes

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Proving that snow globes aren’t just kitschy souvenirs, artist duo Walter Martin and Paloma Muñoz create mini worlds covered by glass domes that are dark, gloomy, and slightly sinister. The scenarios they build are usually set in a stark wintery landscape and feature characters carrying out strange, ill-disposed acts on each other.

Working together since 1994, Martin and Muñoz source different figurines or model making elements, cut them up and re-assemble them as victims or criminals at a crime scene. They use plumber’s epoxy to build the base of the scenes, and cover it in a water resistant resin. Then, they fill up the globes with a water and alcohol solution, to create the authenticity of the object.

Taking inspiration from dreams, movies, and literature, the pair is happy to build on a bizarre or surreal narrative. Their scenes are very dark indeed: A man is caught in the act of dropping a boulder onto another man’s face, or we watch a woman suspiciously planting a dead tree in the snow, or two men vindictively dangling children over a deep dark well, all surrounded by the stillness of snow and winter. They see their snow globes as a celebration of that uneasy feeling you get when you are lost in a crowd, or left alone somewhere uncomfortable. Martin reflects on the environment that he grew up in and those feelings he experienced within them:

I always liked a good snowstorm, and so many of my best memories revolve around those occasions. The water is the thing in Norfolk and Virginia Beach. Everything that comes out of it, everything that you can do on it, or in it, is special. (Source)

Their globes and a number of other artist’s impressions of winter were also featured previously in a post on B/D. Click here to check out the different ideas of just what that wintery spirit is all about.

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Claire Morgan’s Crazy Installations Use Weird Materials Like Taxidermy and Dandelion Seeds

 

…My attention has been drawn to the cheap distractions we choose to place in our immediate vicinity, with which to screen us from the overwhelming facts: that we are nothing; that our only certainty as individuals is a life, of unspecified duration, and then a death.

Seeing some crazy output from London-based artist Claire Morgon. Using a lot of unusual materials, she’s put together some really huge (both in scale and technique) installations. Dandelion seeds? Taxidermy? Yes please.

But to get the full Morgan effect, you have to click to her website. She’s got some awesome works on paper too. And if you’re anywhere near Cologne, Germany, head over to Galerie Karsten Greve, where the artist is currently showing a new batch of work. (via)

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Daniel Zvereff’s Stunning Photographs Of The Arctic Come In Unexpected Hues Of Violet,Red And Blue

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Discontinued film stock has become an obsession amongst fine art photographers, and pretty much everyone else (at least the imitation of it even–think instagram filters). New York-based photographer Daniel Zvereff is no exception. In one of his recent series, Introspective,  Zvereff uses some of the last remaining supply of expired Kodak Aerochrome film in 120 format and takes it to the Arctic–a place as endangered as the film itself.

A travel journalist and photographer, Zvereff looks for the picturesque and the mundane- a good mixture of the two brings forth an interesting and stunning collection of photographs from all over the world- including the ones found here, which were taken in very remote parts of the Arctic.

The usage of the expired film showcases brilliantly unusual but beautifully colored mountains, graveyards, and highways in the brief, verdant Arctic summer are stained in otherworldly pinks and purples.

The now discontinued Aerochrome, was originally developed for the military to help them detect camouflage from helicopters: It responds the chlorophyll in plants and reverses green colors into lavenders and magentas and browns into deep blues.

“The Arctic will essentially be the next frontier for mining natural resources, and with a warming climate it’s safe to say it will soon be transformed as we know it, forever, It only seemed appropriate to photograph its incredible natural beauty using a film that is no longer in existence.”

(via FastCompany)

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Photos Of Heavy Metal Guys With Their Cats Shows The Soft Side Of Metal’s Darkness

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Cats often get a bad reputation because of their strange, idiosyncratic ways and moody temperaments, but are nowhere near as misunderstood and misjudged as the metal music community. A new book, Metal Cats by Alexandra Crockett, looks to change both of these stereotypes simultaneously, and show both Metalheads and feline’s cuddly sides.

From a feature on Bored Panda“The people posing in these photos represent bands with names that are anything but cuddly – Napalm Death, Cattle Decapitation, Murder Construct, Skeletonwitch and Lightning Swords Of Death. But despite these fearsome band names and their black leather, spikes, tattoos and muscles, it’s clear that they share a close relationship with their loveable animals just like the rest of us.”

The musicians featured are also playing a series of benefit concerts at four cities along the United States’ west coast, with proceeds (as well as a portion of the book’s sales) going to no-kill animal shelters at each respective city visited. (via boredpanda)

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