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Yuko Oda

Yuko Oda’s installations are bizarre colorful pieces full of epic narrative. Her drawings provide an interesting shift going for a more ornate, pattern oriented look.

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Studio Visit: Taylor McKimens

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Taylor McKimens is one of my favorite artists, ever since finding his comic book “The Drips,” his work has been on my radar.  So, using my new blogging gig here at Beautiful/Decay as a good reason to see his studio – I went over to Taylor’s studio at Deitch Projects in New York.  I had to ask the perfunctory question about what was happening with Deitch Projects, and he said things depended on several variables – and didn’t go into any details.  His work in progress completely blew me out of the water, and I walked around with my mouth open like a tween at a Jonas Brothers concert.

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100 People Per Minute

 

 

Never Hide Films, in collaboration with N.A.S.A/Squeak E Clean and Rossangeles, has created a little viral video called “100 People Per Minute,” showcasing 100 people creating one beat-boxing orgy of a song in a minute.

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Alvaro Sanchez-Montañes

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Alvaro Sanchez-Montañes, a Barcelona based photographer, decided to explore the abandoned homes and ghost towns of the Namib desert after reading about the deserted diamond mines in Namibia. In this series, Desert Indoors, Alvaro documents inside these empty homes time etching itself into the paint-chipped walls, and observes the desert conquering over any bit of memory or clue of human habitation.

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Jonathan Callan’s Cyclone Book Sculptures

London based Sculptor and installation artist Jonathan Callan takes everyday books and transforms them into cyclones that mimic weather patterns swarming in an infinite cycle. Callan addresses books as objects rather than sacred cultural artifacts and prompts viewers to explore ideas of materiality: what is a book and what is its purpose? Within a cultural context of hyper texts, virtual communication, the Internet and the commodification of books,Callan’s work encourages viewers to consider how we now address traditional modes of relaying knowledge such as through the use of textbooks, encyclopedias and atlases. In his artist statement, Callan describes his work as addressing, “the relationship of disembodied knowledge to embodied experience and materiality.” (via)

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This Is What Humans Looked Like 30,000 Years Ago

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The Paris-based sculptor Elisabeth Daynès listens to bones, to the remains of our evolutionary ancestors that have lived up to three million years ago. Throughout her prolific 20 year career, the “paleoartist” has worked from the skulls of wooly mammoths to species of hominid to create vividly detailed figures. Based on 18 data points that mark the bone, she can use a computer to model facial features that she later shapes out of clay. She refers to research and other bone samples to determine the build of her subjects, and ultimately she creates a silicone cast, complete with delicate painted features: veins, goosebumps, blemishes.

In a final step towards humanizing her sculptures, Daynès includes prosthetic eyes, teeth, and hair, each of which is as historically and scientifically accurate as possible. Current research suggests that Neanderthals, for example, had red hair; for her uncanny hominids, that range from Homo sapien to Homo erectus, she uses a blend of human hair. In her mind’s eye, the artist draws an informed portrait of each subject she reanimates; from the bones, she can determine period, sex and age, along with finer details like culture, climate, diet, and health.

For Daynès, this process is as much an art as it is a science. Ultimately, she hopes to reconnect with our past, embarking on a forensic search of what makes us human. Dismayed by the ways in which early human ancestors are reviled as unintelligent brutes, she injects her creations with a powerful dose of humanity; their brows furrow with concentration, and their eyes are painfully gentle. She explains “missing” them when they leave her studio for a permanent home in a museum. Take a look. (via Daily Mail and Lost at E Minor)

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B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool: Tom Hudson

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On the last day of 2009 we thought we’d pick yet another dedicated B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool members work to post on the blog. This time we bring you Tom Hudson’s hyperspectrum colored collages displayed on his Flickr page full of tasty illustrations, collages, and other eye candy. Tom is 1/4 of a collective called the ‘Nous Vous’, who create everything from drawings to noise performances. That’s quite the spectrum if you ask me.

Remember to join the B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool as we are always looking for new ways to promote our readers & members! Here’s to an awesome new year filled with tons of visual stimuli!

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Ben Butler Creates “Unbounded” Installation From 10,000 Wood Sticks

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Standing like a miniaturized skeleton city, American artist Ben Butler has installed an epic geometric sculpture that seems to distort any sense of space. The installation, titled Unbounded, is a site-specific piece for Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas. The work is made up of ten thousand small rods of poplar wood. Through the creation of complex grids, the artist and a team put together this epic structure, building section by section, almost like a block building meditation. The artist notes that Unbounded “alludes to the notion that its form has no defined boundary, that is it untamed and fills the space according to its own logic.” Butler’s work, which is not solely sculptural but also delves into printmaking and draughtsmanship, consistently refers and reflects on the notion of mass. Each work is intricate, meticulous, but perhaps, most importantly, explores a sort of metaphysical notion of space. Delicate, yet powerful in scale, his work tends to use elements of the earth. The combination of the power of size and the natural material — which acts as a connection to the earth — allows his work to truly carry an awe inspiring essence. Almost like an Agnes Martin notion of finding these quiet patterns within nature meets the raw power of element and structure like the work of Richard Serra. Profound, with a nod to a notion of fun and simplicity, Butler’s installation truly plays with perception. (via IGNANT)

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