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Taylor Davis

I love Taylor Davis’ weird little boxes and bizarre constructions. A lot of them remind me of the magic trick paraphernalia I used to play with endlessly as a little girl- like they have secret compartments or something.

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Spellbinding Death Masks And Sugar Skulls

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For Epitaph, British photographer Rankin teams up with Beaty Editor Andrew Gallimore to create spellbinding death masks inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead and Roman Catholic All Souls Day. Like the sugar skulls, or calavera, used to celebrate the holiday, these elegant masks put a vital and lively spin on death. Decked out in intricate beading and filigree, their models look luxurious and festive.

Calavera, normally colored in vibrant greens, reds, yellows, and blues are often eaten after the holiday; adorned in glittering stars and blooming daisies, these living skulls look like sweet confections. The female faces, painted in black, become a youthful template for imaginative explorations of an afterlife that awaits us after old age. As if from another world, their gray-green eyes stand starkly against coal-toned flesh. Rankin and Gallimore infuse the editorial with a hefty dose of high-fashion edge, introducing elements like metal spikes and and chains. These harder elements blend seamlessly with the iconography of the Day of the Dead; in one mask, a red clown nose made of punk-rock studs puts a contemporary spin on the timeless tradition.

Rankin is not new to the theme of death. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, he was compelled to break cultural taboo surrounding the dead, to face head-on his fears of dying. For last year’s photo series ALIVE: In the Face of Death, published by Hunger Magazine, he photographed those effected most by death, giving voice to grieving family members and to resilient individuals living with terminal diseases. Here, his enthusiastic lens provides solace from the fear of the unknown, inviting us to celebrate those we’ve lost as we mourn them. (via Trend Land)

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Interview: Deep Slumber Lake

Deep Slumber Lake is an artist duo consisting of Todd White and Zachary Scheinbaum. Their imaginative wanderings into the ancient and epic themes of swordcraft, battle axes, and wizardry are grand in scale. These guys spent a lot of time in each other’s basements with 10 sided dice and Priest blasting on the record player. Overlaying this teenage-metal-shredder imagery is a beautiful sense of line work and composition. 

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Yasamin Keshtkar

Yasamin Keshtkar’s work is about examining the role of painting through process, material, and the nature of the two dimensional image. Each painting is part of an effort to solidify these elements into an effective/legitimate result. Personal questions about what she is doing are carried from one painting to another, underscoring this foundational dichotomy between painting and reality that she is trying to represent.

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Kelly Allen’s Vibrant Microcosm Clusters

What looks to be collages are actually gouache paintings by Oakland, CA based Kelly Allen. By combining graphic and natural imagery she forms explosive new forms. Animals, insects, plants, fruits, molecular structures, and colorful geometric elements are assembled into vibrant microcosms. In her own words the works are “…symbiotic accumulations inspired by the systems within nature, and the human experience of recognizing beauty and inventing meaning.”

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Menno Fokma’s Many-Layered Motion

Dark and intricately complex design work and stills by Dutch motion graphics artist Menno Fokma.

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lauren luloff

 

 

Lot of great texture and abstract fabric collage going on in the work of Lauren Luloff. More work and some nice studio shots after the jump!

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Sebastian Errazuriz’s Contagious Yawns Fill Billboards In Time Square

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If you’re local to, or find yourself in New York City during January, head to Times Square to witness artist Sebastian Errazuriz’s site-specific installation. Titled A Pause in the City that Never Sleeps, it’s a black-and-white video featuring the artist slowly yawning multiple times throughout its 11:57PM to midnight timeslot. There isn’t any fancy editing or motion graphics in Errazuriz’s video – it’s just him that dominates approximately 50 electronic billboards that are central to the city’s hustle and bustle.

If you’ve ever visited Times Square, or even just seen pictures of it, you know that it’s a crowded frenzy nearly all times of day. There are hoards of people, bright lights, colors, and jumbo-sized advertisements that are on a continuous loop. Errazuriz’s moment-of-zen video stands in stark contrast to what we’re normally used to seeing. It’s unhurried, hypnotic, and contagious. Visitors might feel the urge to yawn after watching it.

About the project, Errazuiz says, “I hope that the video can offer a brief moment of pause that can remind us of our urgent necessity for free space and time that can allow us to recover a stronger sense of awareness. (…) I am yawning at everything and all of us; we need to wake up.”

Find A Pause in the City that Never Sleeps from 42nd to 47th streets between Broadway and 7th Avenue until January 31. (Via designboom)

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