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Annie Marie Musselman’s Animal Portraits

Annie Marie Musselman’s photographic work has a very unique quality and strategic approach to capturing the soul of an animal. When browsing through the collections on her site, I couldn’t help but feel like I was looking at another human being, not a bird or a fox… Currently, Musselman is working on a project photographing animals in sanctuaries around the world in order to raise awareness around the fragility and beauty of endangered species – animals which if saved, would save countless other species as well.

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Tasha Kusama

I love the use of color in Tasha Kusama’s work.  The Soft Sculptured Dolls piece remind me of some sort of urban resident aliens because of the bright converse combined with striped tube socks.

 

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Clay Hickson’s Saved By The Bell Meets Matisse Collage Aesthetic

Clay Hickson‘s work has got that “Saved By The Bell intro meets a Matisse collage meets a Lichtenstein painting meets Greco-Roman sculpture” feel to it. He takes you into simple rooms occupied by simple foods, simple men, and simple women, with great speed and pacing. He uses an ancient and modern language. It’s a pleasant viewing experience. He tumbles and flicks.

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Bea Szenfeld

Bea_Szenfeld-Sur_la_Plage_9_low

Bea Szenfeld is an outstanding, innovative designer based in Sweden who creates theatrical fashion shows featuring her designs. Her recent collection “Sur la Plage” a continuation off of her earlier work “Paper Dolls,” features 12 hand-made designs that was inspired off of a sea-side folklore of seamen. If you are not familiar with Bea Szenfeld’s work, you may be amazed to know that (just the same as Paper Dolls) this collection is constructed entirely out of paper. Handmade, entirely out of paper, and held together by the process of gluing, sewing, and pleating.

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Sam Green

Check out Sam Green’s fantastic poster created to raise money for Japan’s relief efforts as well as the rest of his portfolio.

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Urs Fischer And Seven Other Artists Create Dynamic Works With Houses

Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer

Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread

 An Te Liu

An Te Liu

The house is a shape everyone has some form of relationship with.  Whether it symbolizes comfort, global financial crises in housing market, cookie cutter mediocrity or family, the house as a mundane symbol or object has been elevated to captivating experimental art and high art on several occasions.  This weekend we share with you a selection of significant works that adapt houses into art objects.

Urs Fischer‘s Untitled (Bread House), constructed of bread, bread crumbs, wood, polyurethane foam, silicone, acrylic paint, screws, tape and rugs leaves every ingredient exposed.  Stepping inside this large sculptural work recently at MOCA had the effect of walking inside a decaying fairytale, as the work is naturally allowed to crumble and decompose in exhibition.  Stepping over piles of crusts of cinnamon raisin bread amidst dirty rugs and peering up at the bubbled polyeurythane foam that seeps between boards and rows of old bread, the viewer may feel any combination of wonder, amusement and fear- much like Grimms Brothers Fairytales.

An Te Liu‘s Title Deed  evolved from the Leona Drive Project in Toronto where a number of vacant tract houses were offered to artists to be reinvented as artistic installations.  As this project took place in 2009 in the height of the housing market crash, the artist observed that the simple shape of the existing house represented the 20th century iconic Monopoly board game house pieces.  The simple, yet flawless execution of Title Deed situated within a functioning suburban neighborhood carries comical yet heavy implications.

 

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Studio Visit: Brian Belott

Brian Belott in His Studio

Brian Belott’s Brooklyn studio is an immersive installation.  Spelunking into a cavern on an alien planet filled with glittering artifacts from a lost culture, might, might compare to walking through Brian’s place.  I was going to stay for an hour, but ended up being there for four hours because there was so much to look at and talk about.  The whole situation is arranged with the discerning eye of the most selective, borderline pathological scavenger – and set to easy listening music, Brian’s “sonic wallpaper.”  I got the feeling that each scrap of torn paper, every tube of glitter has been internalized.  Then arranged into an invisible system that had started to resemble the stratified layers of rock at the Grand Canyon – there was a geological, epic scale to the amount of materials.  Brian works with some art materials, but mostly with found stuff.  He uses those thick cardboard kids books, colorful plastic combs, found audio, and posters.  He makes paintings on glass, original music, found sound audio collages, paper collages, books covered in paint and decorated with rocks, and catalogs of other people’s private photography grouped by themes.  In addition he does performances, many of which are on YouTube.  Meeting Brian I got the immediate impression I was meeting someone special.   He has a gigantic solo show “The Joy of File” opening Friday, February 26th at Zürcher Studio from 6 to 8pm.

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Slinkachu Reminds Us Of The Little Things In Life In His Photos Of A Miniature World

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

Slinkachu - Digital Photograph

miniature installation

miniature installation

A person’s a person, no matter how small! Creating work under the name “Slinkachu,” this artist reminds us to pay attention to the little things in life in his miniature scenes. Photographed in London, Slinkachu constructs clever and irresistibly tiny scenes of people living their lives in the cracks of urban life. One small girl is swinging from a bent weed while other little people are diving off a Popsicle stick to swim in its melting juices. These photographs seem to capture a secret, pocket-sized world that exists right under our noses, reminding us to stop a while and take in our surroundings. This series also includes photographs of the little scenes in its real surroundings, giving it a sense of scale, revealing how small they really are.

These inch-high people are somewhat like the normal-sized urbanite, living in the shadows of tall buildings, just as Slinkachu’s people live in shadow. They are playing, swimming, and horseback riding in a concrete jungle, commenting on our own detachment from nature. However, this does not deter us from searching for it. We create our own nature in the form of city parks, just as Slinkachu’s playful little people find nature in a spilled soda pop, which they hop over like a pond. These hopeful scenes of miniature realities might criticize our separation from the natural world, but humorously point out our optimism and resourcefulness.

An exhibition of Slinkachu’s photographs titled Miniaturesque will be opening March 13th at Andipa Contemporary, located in London.

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