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Chris Bors’ Hardcore Confrontation Of Violence

Paintings by Chris Bors.

“My recent paintings, which appropriate logos from hardcore punk bands, are meticulously hand painted to resemble silkscreen prints. I often incorporate drips of color that activate the surface and create a jarring contrast, which also references stain paintings of the 1950s and 60s. To compose the paintings, I combine images from various sources including vintage magazines, children’s activity books, websites, and my own drawings. The juxtaposition of these elements resembles the compositions of and mimics the tactics used in political messaging. The work also plays on the confrontation of violence and solidarity as expressed in a music genre that has roots based on a struggle for social justice.”

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Paintings Made Of Real Human Ashes Immortalize The Dead

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When the artist Adam Brown paints a portrait, he sprinkles cremated human remains into his palette, hoping to memorialize the dead in a way that celebrates their individualism and vitality; each image, most commissioned by the loved one of a recent decedent, serves as an alternative to the traditional urn.

After Brown’s clients submit a sampling of sandy ashes, the artist dons a pair of gloves and mixes them with paint to create personalized renditions and imaginings of the dead that span from straight black and white portraiture to dreamy colored abstractions. He carefully preserves any and all unused ashes, ultimately returning them to his client.

The project, titled Ashes to Art, poignantly aims to reconstruct the deconstructed body, fixing delicate cremains with glue and paint; in this way, his paintings work to incapsulate the entirety of the human body and lifetime into one sly smile, one glint of the eye, or one splash of color.

Brown’s ambitious body of work subverts morbid thoughts on human remains, adopting the medium to create shockingly cheerful faces, heavily textured hands, and vividly yellow flames. The idea of permanence figures prominently into the work; not unlike the popular ritualistic scattering of ashes over the sea, his landscape paintings elegantly incorporate the corporeal into the seemingly eternal earth, everlasting sky, or immovable mountains.

With each work, the artist ensures the respectful remembrance of human life with a simple inscription; lest a piece get lost or auctioned and taken for an average painting, he writes a disclaimer on its backing: this work of art contains human remains. (via Daily Mail and Oddity Central)

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Blank William Redesigns The Iconic Stormtrooper Mask Into Three Futuristic Animals

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Like many of us, Blank William grew up a fan of the Star Wars series. Now, he has used his passion and talent as a designer to create a new variety of Stormtroopers—ones with animal features. His feral, futuristic battalion consists of two series, The New Order: White and The New Order: Black. Currently, there are elephant, rhino, and hippo designs, and William has brilliantly meshed the animals’ physical features with the soldiers’ glossy plastoid armor, dark eyes, and ventilation details. Each one is accentuated with gold or silver, giving them a slightly more lethal and formidable appearance. William’s work seems to be playing off the expressionless and ruthless appearance of the original Stormtroopers.

William’s smooth, space-age style is carried into his other works, including a series of animal chess pieces. You can view more of his work on his website. For our readers with Star Wars on the mind—as we know, The Force Awakens is released next month—we’re curious about what you think of William’s reimagining of the iconic Stormtroopers; do you prefer this look for your favourite soldiers? What other animals would be fit to protect the Empire? Comment below! (Via designboom)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Luis

Luis is the 2nd short video of the series “Lucía, Luis y el lobo” (”Lucía, Luis and the Wolf”). The video was shot frame by frame with a digital photo camera. Materials: charcoal, dirt, flowers, found objects and cardboard.

By Niles Atallah, Cristobal Leon & Joaquin Cociña

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Bill Domonkos’ Double Feature

Bill Domonkos’ short films remind me of late night double feature screenings of your favorite spacey B-Movie. Using small budgets, experimental techniques, and a bit of creativity Domonkos creates interesting movies full of wit, spooky narratives, and haunting story lines. 

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Krzysztof Domaradzki A.K.A Studio KXX

Krzysztof Domaradzki

Krzysztof Domaradzki or Studio KXX for short has a eye popping portfolio full of illustrations and designs. Visit his site yourself for a visual feast.

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Lesbian Beds

Photographs of beds belonging to lesbians by Tammy Rae Carland.

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Miniature Dioramas By Didier Massard Unfold Surreal Landscapes

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French artist Didier Massard creates eye-deceiving miniature dioramas depicting surreal, mystical landscapes. From a first glance, these sets remind of extremely detailed, hyper-realistic paintings or digitally rendered images. The striking effect unfolds after closer examination, when the viewer is exposed to careful layering and thoughtful light arrangements.

Massard explains his inspiration comes from real and imagined places. The limits of real life infuses his imagination to create mythological and romantic scenarios, which he then calls “the completion of an inner imaginary journey”. China, India, the cliffs of Normandy and many other locations have been depicted in Didier’s works.

“There were many places in the world where I’d never gone that I wished to photograph. I realized that they would not at all look like the images I had of them. Reality was different from my imagination. So I started building and photographing in a studio what I had in mind.”

Artist spends months constructing his miniature worlds, thus the collection is only slowly growing in size. Massard started his career as a commercial photographer for fashion and cosmetic companies like Chanel, Hermes and others. After his first series of dioramas, titled “Imaginary Journeys”, his work was acknowledged and now Didier works exclusively on his personal projects. His work is currently on display at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles until August 23.

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