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Megan Mosholder’s Luminous Twine Installations

Megan Mosholder installation Wassaic, NY Megan Mosholder installation Wassaic, NY Megan Mosholder installation Wassaic, NY

Megan Mosholder creates work from the simplest materials, and then illuminates the installations to give the work a unique visual depth and a lasting sensory experience. Mosholder explains, “My practice is centered around site-responsive, sculptural installations that emphasize obscured elements within recognizable objects. Through the utilization of materials such as light, twine, eyelets and wood, I articulate space and present a multi-sensory experience.”

In her work, Support and Seizure (above), the Ohio-born, Brooklyn-based artist immersed herself in the history of the buildings during her Wassaic Artist Residency. By installing to a former livestock auction space, Mosholder visually connects the past of the local’s agrarian history to the current artist residents. The artist says, “I was interested in the revival of the Wassaic, once a forgotten hamlet plagued with home foreclosures. Many of the community members told me how happy they were that the residency was in existence because it brought new life and interest to the area.”

In her previous work Gossamer (below), nylon cord is hand-painted with light-reactive, glow in the dark paint and blacklit to create a radiant blue field of three-dimensional lines. Installed underneath a Hilton Head Island, South Carolina barn, the work was the artist’s largest to date. Built of 15,000 feet of nylon cord, 2000 screw eyes, and taking over 150 hours to construct, Mosholder responds to the utilitarian construct and architectural forms of the site. Explaining that there is more to each piece than just the visual stimulation, viewers should also understand the creative reaction to the implied histories of the building.  “These “three-dimensional drawings” bind the social and literal landscape and reawaken for a moment the simple intrigue of looking. They are a visual dialogue about movement, time and dimension and encourage the viewer to appreciate spaces for what they are but also examine their hidden meanings.” (via designboom)

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Video Watch: Jason Mitcham’s Animation Created By Thousands Of Slight Alterations On A Single Painting

Jason Mitcham paints scenes from everyday America, and for The Avett Brothers’ new music video, he was commissioned to use his paintings to tell the story of an American city. For the video, Jason made an animation by painting each “frame” over one another on the same canvas thousands of times over. I love it because you get to see the painting process in a really unique way–normally we only get a finished product, but in the video we get to see strokes that make something and are then covered, erased, and made into another image ad infinitum. Half of the pleasure of this video is watching the ghosted images from previous frames. It works in a more figurative way too, in that the trace images represent the lingering of history in the present.  Check out the video after the jump!

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Follow Beautiful/Decay On Instagram @beautifuldecayofficial!

We’ve put it off for as long as possible but you can now follow me and see all the awesome, random, and random stuff I photograph all day long. I can’t promise a few occasional shots of the adorable B/D mascot Mr.Baxter but I’ll try to keep them to a minimum. What you can expect is lots of art, design, street art, studio visits and more.  So jump on your phone, ipad, and any other Instagram compatible device and follow your favorite art publication at @beautifuldecayofficial !

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Benjamin Björklund Paints Blurred Faces That Uncover Deep Emotional States

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The paintings of artist Benjamin Björklund unearth and obscure the emotional states of his subjects. Working from a rustic, nineteenth-century farmhouse in Uppsala, Sweden, his muses are often those around him: family members, Solomon (his Great Dane), his pet rabbits, mice, rats, and guinea pigs, as well as the wild animals outside. Faces are painted in soft colors, seeming to reflect the pale light of the northern sun. However, everything seems a bit out of focus; eyes and hairlines and skin meld together, giving the portraits an impressionistic style. Dual forces are at play as the figures shift imperceptibly between reality and abstraction, presence and distance.

Ben’s project is to interpret and convey the inner worlds of his subjects. This is a compelling concept, given that portraiture is traditionally a desired projection of someone—a veneer of their character. Ben’s work, however, is more honest in that it connects the physical surface to the intangible swirl within. His about page explains his approach further:

“Ben’s figurative and portraiture work can, at times, depict scenes bordering on the surreal with characters influenced by those around him existing in various physical or emotional situations. These are usually emphasized through the use of abstracted light and darts of color. These, Ben refers to as ‘happy mistakes’ being borne from spontaneous actions and serving to focus the viewer’s attention whilst adding to the emotional impact on the viewer.” (Source)

In their abstraction, Ben’s subjects become deeply individualistic, while also exploring the metaphysical depths and complexities of human identity.

Ben’s paintings are held in private collections in many cities around the world, including LA, Melbourne, and throughout Europe. You can explore more of his work on his website and Instagram. (Via Hi-Fructose)

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Haunting Photographs Of Places Marked By Tragic Suicides

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This series from the landscape photographer Donna J. Wan might at first seem exhilarating, with its sweeping views of turquoise blue, frothy water; however, overlaid each magnificent seascape is the knowledge that tragic suicides have occurred in these exact spots. The artist, inspired by her own postpartum depression, names her body of work Death Wooed Us after a line from the poet Louise Gluck: “Death wooed us, by water, wooed us.”

Wan’s stunning images look startlingly like the work of of Caspar Davd Friedrich, whose dark romantic landscape paintings capture the spiritual bonds between human and nature. Friedrich, who is widely assumed to have suffered from depression, also used the shifting tides, colored with mist and fog, to express the lonesomeness of the human condition. Where the 19th century painter employed a human figure, his back facing the viewer, Wan leaves her bridges and overlooks painfully empty; any (wo)man who has sat and contemplated his (or her) life and death here has since departed.

Wan’s tragic photographs stretch endlessly to the edges of the frame, as if her somber landscapes could barely fit within a single shot. They alternate between vitality and utter silence; where some capture the bubbling surf and faraway beach-goers, others present the water fixed and frozen, still as a glass mirror. The materiality of the bodies of water is powerful; we can imagine their impact, cold and wet. Standing at the precipice, viewers feel the danger of the majestic waters; ultimately, we are compelled to turn away, the unforgettable image pressed into our mind’s eye. (via Feature Shoot)

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Women Confront Their Body Insecurities In Empowering Photographic Series By Neringa Rekasiute

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

While the work of Lithuanian photographer Neringa Rekasiute ranges from surreal scenes of fantasy to eccentric portraits, each photo illustrates a prevalent theme of her oeuvre: an admiration and appreciation for the female form. Thus, it is no surprise that Neringa has teamed up with writer, journalist, and actress Beata Tiskevic and communications specialist Modesta Kairyte to create We.Women, a female-centric photographic series.

Inspired by theories of feminism and discouraged by Lithuania’s apparent and prevailing cult of beauty, Neringa, Beata, and Modesta imagined We.Women as an empowering response to the impossible standards of beauty projected onto women.

Using Beata’s Facebook page as a platform, the trio invited women with self-esteem issues to assist them with their project by partaking in a harrowing task: standing before a mirror, shedding their clothing, and allowing their bodies and consequent reactions to be photographed.   The results—twelve black-and-white photos accompanied by a personal memoir written by each woman—are captivating and relatable, with the heartaches at hand spanning “anorexia, bulimia, breast cancer, vitiligo, depression, fat-shaming, and skinny-shaming,” as well as additional mental health perils and even cases of domestic abuse.

Deemed by Neringa as “a healing experience,” We.Women has undoubtedly aided the creators in their objective to spread awareness and, subsequently, to bring women together: “I just want women to feel united,” Neringa divulges, “I want us to feel bonded.” (Via Bored Panda)

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Ecological Anxieties As Surreal Paintings

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There is something unsettling in many of the paintings of Alexis Rockman.  His work typically depicts the natural world – wildlife of different sorts in locales as varied.  The scenes are surreal as strange groupings of animals converge on a single canvas.  However, some sort of order appears to be breaking down and a chaos not often found in nature seems to be gaining ground.  Rockman’s paintings illustrate a wider ecological anxiety over our troubled world.  In a way he uses his paintings as a form of protest.  The work becomes a powerful expression of deep concern that is easy to feel.

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One Million Ways Mexico Is A Better Artist Than All Of Us

612_1228844014Jared Lindsay Clark makes an interesting observation on how everyday images from Mexico make for better works of art than most pieces one comes across in galleries.

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