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Delightful GIFs Of Adorable Monsters Capture Childhood’s Fears

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 With his collection of delightful three-dimensional GIFs, the illustrator Dain Fagerholm creates whimsical universes that are both wondrous and terrifying. Filled with monsters reminiscent of Maurice Sendak’s “wild things,” the precious animations exist in a space caught between childhood nightmares and dreams. The artist draws each by hand, and the illusion of three-dimensionally of the work is expressed by a fast-paced alternating between a few images drawn from similar but differing perspectives.

Fagerholm’s lovely work is infused with a playful sense of anxiety; his characters, both human and otherwise, curl on the ground of tightly enclosed spaces like affrighted children. Wide-eyed and appearing to move manically back and forth, they hold their knees close to their chest. In these strange, surreal narratives, we are invited to feel the claustrophobia of a time out, recalling the lonesomeness and isolation of being bound to our rooms. One girl seems to be trapped within a TV screen, seemingly sucked into a blue, static-filled haze by her own imagination, peering curiously and excitedly outward.

These sweet, solitary creatures play and daydream in a dark state of nighttime unease. A seven-headed dragon evokes images of the beast from the biblical text Revelations, recalling (in an unexpectedly adorable way) frightful notions of eternity and punishment. As if pulled from films like The Shining or Poltergeist, Fagerholm’s characters transcend the real world, reaching instead for a chaotic, nervous aesthetic. With eyes dazed like hypnotic spirals, these little monsters seem to wait impatiently for sunrise and open air, for someone to keep them company. (via Demilked)

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Bert Löeschner’s Lawn Chair Art

Bert Löeschner among the artists with the spirit of animators who anthropomorphically instill life in the objects they choose. His object of choice is the ever-present and thereby invisible lawn chair. Löschner uses them to make charming characters and sculptures of equally ubiquitous objects– lovers, vagabonds, pedestrians, swingsets, etc. Next time you’re bored or down, just anthropomorphize the objects and plants around you and the world will be a much friendlier place. (via)

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Eko Nugroho

Working with thick dark outlines, Eko Nugroho‘s graphic technique and imagery reflect Indonesia’s media-rich and politically charged environment. The artist cites Malaysian cartoonist Lat, TV series from the 1980s such as Megaloman and wayang kulit (shadow puppets) as early influences. His part man-part machine characters are often accompanied by bizarre and ironic statements in speech bubbles or t-shirt slogans. At times, they can be menacing, displaying the potential for violence – wielding sharp objects in their hands, or with weapons as limbs. In others, they come across as scientific experiments gone wrong –a la B-grade films – where humans mutate into alien-like creatures, sprouting plastic flowers from their orifices, crouching on all fours with test tubes and strange objects growing from different parts of their bodies. Imbued with macabre humour and satire, Nugroho’s comic inspired work may come across as seemingly straightforward – often a central figure standing against a simple background, presented as a series of simple scenes from a larger narrative – while the artist’s inimitable pating tlecek style of fusing and juxtaposing a wide range of visual elements (and languages), lends his work a certain layer of absurdity.

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Ceramicist Lauren Gallaspy Creates Fantastical Sculptures Confronting Vulnerable Imbalance

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Artist Lauren Gallaspy creates unique and dynamic ceramic sculptures that play with notions of fantasy and duality. Her work, beautiful, adventurous, and full of a sense of wonder, invokes magical moments of nonsensical, yet somehow perfected, chaos. Her intention lies in finding balance in seemingly irrational binaries. She explains, “the things that I love and the things that I fear refuse to balance out. They scrap like cats, cloak and conceal like kudzu, terrify and delight, like a large, shaky lake or a dog swimming hard towards a floating ball.” The artist uses this tension to create creative and inventive ceramic sculptures, which are not only experimental by nature, but break boundaries of traditionalist methods of pottery. Experiencing Gallaspy’s work is like an investigation. Each color, each angle, each new treatment of material is expressive and fascinating. Her work screams out for a quiet attention, being open ended yet intimate. Her work emphasizes the complexity of humanity, the ups and downs of just simply being. She explains;

“My work is about that imbalance: the vulnerability of living things and the sometimes violent, sometimes pleasurable, almost always complex consequences that occur when bodies and objects in the world come into contact with one another. I use ornamentation, obsessive mark-making, and decorative imagery as a kind of devotional or transformational act, a way to render interior spaces and intense psychological experiences physically.”

 

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Steve Gorman Reanimates

Steve Gorman’s ceramic works explore his obsession with nature,  animal and human forms, and even his interests in fashion. His sculptures are fantastic and futuristic forms that live between the fine line of abstracting and figuration.  Steve’s current exhibit titled Reanimate at the Nerman Museum Of Contemporary Art in Overland Park Kansas is not to be missed. The show will be up until May 8th.

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The Future Of Painting: An Amazing New Method To Paint 3D Printed Surfaces

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A brand new method for painting 3D objects may just revolutionize the way our cups, shoes, masks, vases, or car parts are decorated. Basically any type of object – and not necessarily a 3D printed one, can undergo this process, and come out with a multicolored pattern transferred onto it’s surface. Researchers from Hangzhou’s Zheijiang University and NYC’s Columbia University ave come up with this idea, one that they call computational hydrographic printing.

Hydrographic printing isn’t entirely a new thing – in the past, patterns were applied onto a thin film of plastic sitting on a body of water. The object was then dipped into the water, through the adhesive-soaked film. The trouble with that method is that the pattern was stretched around the sides of the item, warping and ruining the design. It could never yield consistent results. But this is the difference now:

….what they do is 3-D scan whatever object they want to print on before they dunk it. Algorithms then take whatever pattern you want to paint on it, and print it on the layer of transparent film in such a way that, when lowered into the water bath by a robotic arm, the pattern will be applied perfectly, every time. (Source)

With this method, you can repeatedly dunk the item, and decorate multiple sides, without the pattern getting screwed up. Be sure to watch the video to watch the whole incredible process. (Via Fast Code Design)

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Lily Morris

Lily Morris is an emerging artist based out of Brooklyn, NY. Detailed and yet distorted, her paintings depict foggy but seemingly familiar scenes that require squinting eyes and conjure a feeling akin to driving somewhere remote in the pouring rain.  Her style fluctuates between washy layers of oil and solid photographic realism. Subjects and objects are caught exploding, describing the very instant an action occurs- the horrifying moment before perception intervenes and untangles what just happened. Morris’s paintings recount these inexplicable, fleeting moments of confusion and lay them out in raw and compelling fashion. 

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Dean Monogenis Fuses Modern Architecture With Geometric Shapes

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Artist Dean Monogenis paints landscapes that fuse modern buildings with geometric shapes. The abstract compositions often feature the architecture suspended in midair, connected to giant rock formations, or structural patterns.

Monogenis’ colorful and minimalist paintings came to life after witnessing the fall of the World Trade Center in 2011. “ Subsequent to that day,” he writes, “I began to see buildings organically in terms of birth and death.” The artist continues:

Interestingly the post 9/11 period was the beginning of a world wide building boom. At the time I lived in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where the breadth and pace of this development felt like an invasion. Buildings grew nearly over night like mushrooms or mold before my very eyes. I found it simultaneously engaging and frightening.

This construction had little regard for continuity or urban planning:

After overcoming my initial shock, I began to distance myself and consider the situation aesthetically. I interpreted the randomness as more akin to the shantytowns in Jamaica or the Favelas in Rio. I took notice of the simplicity and planer forms of the skeletal structures as they ascended upward. Brightly colored building materials like netting and scaffolding, became interesting to me. I thought if there was a way to distill the temporary and all its ephemera, isolating key pieces into my work, then I would be able to elevate the visual indicators that speak to this period of transformation.

Monogenis usually paints on wood or plastic panels and uses customized stencils of graphic elements. He’ll paint the sky last, but isn’t afraid to sand and rework areas if something doesn’t look right. This allows him to create precise work without forfeiting the spontaneity that’s inherent in painting. (Via Supersonic)

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