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Mike Calway-Fagan’s Mixed Media Collage

Mike Calway-Fagan’s collage work mixes dissimilar photography with a sense of urgency. The artist asserts that his works hopes to ‘critique complacency and aestheticise catastrophe’ by creating dis-ordered imagery that evoke disaster. See more after the jump.

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Dan Attoe

Accretion 39 (Dumb Babies)

Combine the variety of Hieronymus Bosch and the weirdness of David Lynch; add a pinch of skateboarding and two d-cups of death metal and you’ve got a good recipe for taking in Dan Attoe’s newest painting, “Accretion 40.”  Placing multiple small scenes over an end-of-days landscape, he touches on everything from a drawing monkey (self-portrait?), to strippers, Christmas, and going to Hell.  Dan put the finishing touches on this yesterday, and he’s about to move and have a kid, so this is going to be the last big painting for a little while.

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Interview with Kim Holtermand

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Our friends over at Strange Attractor have launched an interesting new interview series entitled “Still Life.”  SA sends the artist a lomography camera and a roll of film, and the “interview” becomes conducted entirely through artist-created images. The above interview with Denmark based artist Kim Høltermand is a beautiful look at his life, through his own eyes.

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The Bizarre Fan Art of World Dictators

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Kim Jong-un, originally posted by @harleyjohnson92 on Instagram

kimjongun

Kim Jong-un, originally posted by @jacob_skyler_allen on Instagram

putin

Vladimir Putin, originally posted by @miss1718 on Instagram

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Muammar Gaddafi, originally posted by @fabiankytir on Instagram

The world of fan art knows no bounds. Television shows like Game of Thrones and Sherlock have countless drawings and paintings dedicated to them (and the celebrities that star in them), but what about world dictators? We’re talking Putin, Gaddafi, Kim Jong-un, and more all with colorful drawings, paintings, and even homages made from donuts.

Some of these images are just ridiculous, like Kim Jong-un riding a dolphin over the beach (in a background that looks as colorful as a Lisa Frank illustration). Others are more serious attempts at portraiture, like the work of Amsterdam-based artist Michele Boccamazzo. He mixes pen, ink, and watercolor in realistic renderings like Bashar al-Assad. “Some of them are just born with a silver spoon in their mouth, some believe in their vision of a better world and some are just status seeker (or social climber) with a smart politic career.” He writes.

With the atrocities suffered at the hands of these men, they hardly seem like candidates for fan art, so perhaps its best to peg some of these images as satire. It makes looking at these works even more bizarre than what’s already pictured.  (via Lost At E Minor and Vocativ)

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Gorgeous Photographs Of Shattered Flowers Soaked In Liquid Nitrogen

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After soaking them for thirty minutes in freezing liquid nitrogen, the New York based photographer Jon Shireman hurls flowers onto a hard, white surface, causing them to shatter into hundreds of pieces. The series, titled Broken Flowers, plays on our assumption that flowers are soft and supple; as an integral part of much still life photography, the blossoms normally symbolize youth and delicate feminine beauty. Under Shireman’s lens, however, the flora is transformed into something cold and hard. Against a sterile white backdrop, they appear sterile and brittle, a far cry from the spring buds that blow in the wind.

Throughout his career, Shireman has maintained a connection with flowers in decay; in other still lifes, he has cataloged the wilting of tulips and mums. This series, unlike those previous, is brutal and instantaneous. Where his other flowers underwent a slow, gradual death, these broken flowers are quickly frozen and violently ruptured. The process captured here is not a natural one but one that necessitates the use of a manmade element.

With almost surgical precision, Shireman’s lens focusses on the fallen flower, and he abandons the moody, romantic lighting he uses elsewhere in favor of high resolution and vivid color. Though flattened, the shattered blossoms maintain their basic structure; the bud, the stem, and the leaf can still be made out. The very veins of the plant are preserved by the liquid nitrogen. In this way, the flowers look like dead bodies in some unusual crime scene, outlined yet robbed of their living essence. Take a look. (via iGNANT, Feature Shoot, and Agonistica)

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Murray John

“Goodbye London” is the new music video from Luke Jackson, directed and animated by London-based animator Murray John. It combines stop motion photography of London with some nice hand-drawn animation added with After Effects. “I set out to capture the bitter sweetness of London life, using urban sketchy drawings on walls,” says Mr. John.

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Jon Klassen

Jon Klassen

 

Originally from Niagara Falls, Canada, Jon Klassen currently resides in Los Angeles. In addition to showcasing artwork with The Ebeling GroupThe Wurst Gallery, and Gallery Nucleus, Jon has worked on visual development and drawings of sets and props for the lovely, stop-motion animated film, Coraline. The colors and shapes he employs are muted and earthy, organic and geometric. I love his simple, folksy patterns and hand drawn text.

 

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Beth Campbell’s Artwork Is Toying With Your Perception

Blue Lamps, 2010

Blue Lamps, 2010

Stereo Table, 2012

Stereo Table, 2012

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

Bookshelf Loveseat, 2013

My parent’s bathroom at the house I first lived in had a full-length mirror behind the sink, which also had a mirror.  As soon as I was tall enough to see over the counter, I remember staring at an infinite number of my own reflections bouncing back and forth and I recall the frustration that I could never find where the reflections ended.  This is the memory invoked when I saw Beth Campbell’s work for the first time.

Working in a variety of mediums: drawings, sculpture and what she calls “architectural interventions,” Campbell’s body of work toys with perception.  Her Potential Future Based on Present Circumstances drawing series maps possible outcomes to present decisions.  These were the first works I saw by Campbell and I recall thinking how brilliant, but impossible they were.  Like me and my reflection in the mirror, Campbell was trying to make sense of the unrealistic and perhaps impractical idea that we can know what might have been.  Their humor and neurosis seemed so quintessentially human to me that I became an instant lover of her work.

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