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Delicate X-Ray Photographs Offer A Touchingly Intimate Glimpse Into The Everyday

hughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0000_layer_comp_1.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0015_layer_comp_16.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0017_layer_comp_18.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscaleHugh Turvey X-Ray images

The artist Hugh Turvey lives his life in x-ray vision; since her began creating his vivid, colored x-ray photographs, titled xograms, he views the world and its objects as something to be dissected, unveiled, and understood. Turvey’s strange x-rays are made thusly: he begins by positioning his subjects on light-sensitive paper, then overlays them with photographs and adds color so as to enhance depth.

X-ray technology, which we so often associated with sterile medicine, healthcare, and the danger of internal injury, finds an oddly tender home in Turvey’s work. Dense objects become visual synecdoches, stand-ins for living subjects; in one image, a coat becomes personified, its zippers, seams, and wrinkles suggesting human posture. Femme Fatale pictures the artist’s wife’s foot: contorted, stressed, delicate.

When placed alongside these relatively personal images, x-rays of suitcases, phones, and first-aid kits no longer retain the cold, effective objectivity we are accustomed to seeing during TSA screenings and the like. Instead, we are offered a satisfyingly voyeuristic glimpse into the private lives of others as seen through a tumbler or a martini glass, and we are transfixed by the mundane, incidental objects of existence.

Turvey’s portraits of animals are particularly poignant, indicating the complex internal lives of creatures we too rarely consider. A fish is confined to a painfully isolating bowl, his boney frame drifting to the top for food, and a small dog reveals soft, beautifully coiled internal organs as he wears a cone around his head. Similarly, a curious rabbit is shown in dark, moody browns evocative not of medicine so much as psychology and spirit; his wide eyes peer above the hat. These deeply sympathetic animals are made all the more delicate by Turvey’s process, their curiosities and concerns expressed through the barest physicality. (via Smithsonian Mag, The Guardian, and National Geographic)

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Bordeaux Artist Collective

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Damien Arnaud (graphic designer) and fellow artists Florent Berthaut, a.k.a Hitmuri (artist)  Claire Soubrier (photographer), and Max Boufathal (artist) collaborate on various projects, bringing their individual sensibilities and specialties together to create a multimedia dynamic that entices all the senses.

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Jon Rafman

The embedded video above comes from the latest project by Montreal-based media artist Jon Rafman. Kool-Aid Man in Second Life offers to give Internet users free guided tours of Second Life by Rafman’s avatar, the Kool-Aid Man. The aforementioned video is a promotional video showing scenes of the tour (by the way, apparently some of this may not be NSFW, though I watched the first minute or two and didn’t really notice anything bad). The subtlety of the video, and the entire project, is what makes it so engaging. There are all sorts of questions raised here: about the role of crafted pop culture icons in the new era of user generated content, about the nature of scenic beauty, about our interaction with kitsch. Someone take the tour and let us know how it is!

PS: Check out this essay Rafman wrote on Google Street View. Very compelling stuff.

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Indian book cover designs from 1964 to 1984

Book cover, 1972 (front)

Book cover, 1972 (front)

Found these awesome Indian book cover designs from a couple decades ago on A Journey Round My Skull, my go-to blog for all vintage graphic design. Unfortunately, the designers for each of the book covers weren’t listed. You can see the fronts and backs of each book (I only posted either front or back here) and it’s really amazing to see how well integrated the whole of the design is and how designers during that time were just mainly illustrators.

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Photo Contest Champs

Thanks everybody for sending in the photos! You are all beautiful people AND sharp dressers! Heres some glamour shots of the contest winners …

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Greg Eason

Greg Eason

 

Greg Eason of Norfolk, UK, has a hand for drawing very realistic pencil illustrations, to fantastic patterns and sketches that stretch and bend across his sketchbook page. There’s something very comforting in his illustrations, their lifelike feeling, and the vacant page that inhabits the characters of his pieces.

My current work explores the era Anthropocene, working primarily in pencil, and the focus of my current work is driven by the desire to push the physical limitations of scale. I am also interested in the unpredictable nature of pattern; my interest lies in the production of organic linear structures and the suggestion of fluidity through repeated marks.

 

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Design Month: Wacom Inkling

We can’t talk design without talking about the products that make it all happen. When I first heard of Wacom’s forthcoming Inkling I could barely contain my excitement at the possibilities. It works on an up to A4 size paper, you can draw in layers and importing into your computer seems seamless. Imagine what you could do in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator with this tool? My current Wacom Intuos is a permanent fixture and I can’t imagine working in Adobe Illustrator without it.

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Valerie Hegarty And Three Other Artists Who Have Mastered The Art Of Illusion

Valerie Hegarty

Valerie Hegarty

Fanette Guilloud

Fanette Guilloud

Kyung Woo Han

Kyung Woo Han

Thomas Quinn

Thomas Quinn

Valerie Hegarty’s Alternative Histories was installed at the Brooklyn Museum in one of their Period Rooms.  Hegarty’s site-specific installations toy with a viewer’s perception—they create the illusion that the process of destruction or decay has been accelerated and what we see are the remains of the real artwork.

Thomas Quinn is a Chicago designer who experiments with something called “anamorphic typography.”  When viewed from a certain angle the text looks just right, but when one moves around the text morphs and warps.

Fanette Guiloud is also interested in anamorphic projection and used the method to create a series of photos titled Géométrie de l’impossible (Impossible Geometry).  Only 22-years old, the illusion is impressively successful.  Influenced by artists such as Felice Varini, Guilloud is certainly an artist to keep our eye on.

Creating installations that defy logic and inspire wonder South Korean artist Kyung Woo Han says of the work, “All the facts are relevant. People see what they want to see. One fact can be interpreted in several ways depend on our perceptions. In the opposite, two different facts can be looked the same. My work deals with perception and illusions. Everything we see or what we know is not absolute. I suggest various ways to perceive things with slightly different perspectives.

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