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P.Williams

P.Williams
If you like funny looking faces, then you’re gonna love what P.Williams has going on. A little bit of Crumb mixed with some Barry McGee, throw in some Spongebob Squarepants and we’re starting to get a little bit closer. Great selective use of color and text too, it looks like this guy fills up an entire sketchbook every week!

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Marcus DeSieno’s Beautiful and Terrifying Photos Of Microscopic Parasites

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It is fair to assume that while most of us know that our world, our living spaces, and even our bodies are covered with microscopic organisms, we do like to not be reminded of it. Photography student Marcus DeSieno’s recent photoseries begs to differ, offering a beautiful yet disturbingly close look at our microscopic natural surroundings. Parasites is an ongoing project “investigating a history of scientific exploration through images of parasitic animals.” Taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope and then exposed onto dry plate gelatin ferrotype plates, a process which combines classical and cutting-edge photographic techniques. The final images are archival pigment prints from the scanned ferrotype plates and printed larger for these abject animals to confront the viewer at a one-on-one scale.

“Photography and science have had an intrinsic relationship since its’ invention in 1839. It did not take William Henry Fox Talbot long until he was using his calotype process to capture what was under the lens of his microscope. The indexical nature of photography has pushed the reaches of science ever forward into the 21st century. These technologies allow us to peer in to the unexamined corners of the natural world reminding us that the universe around us is much greater than ourselves. In this realm of scientific curiosity, photography has a intriguing relationship with the invisible, allowing us to see the world that we cannot. Parasites explores these themes of science and wonder and, at the same time, confronts a personal fear of these parasitic organisms that attach themselves to humans. Embedded in the work is an engaging dialog with photographic history, its\’ shifting modes of representation, and its’ material possibilities. Parasites investigates the role of shifting photographic technologies in contemporary culture and their abilities to capture a mysterious and unseen world.”

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Sea Wreckage or Art? Mary O’Malley’s ‘Porcelain Crustaceans’

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Mary O’Malley’s Bottom Feeders is a series of oceanic ceramics that look as if they were discovered among sea wreckage. These “porcelain crustaceans” appear delicate and dangerous, as the aquatic life that crawls among the porcelain seems as if could consume and become the dish itself. Inspired by her home by the sea, O’Malley created this series with porcelain, red Iron oxide, 22 karat gold luster, and a cone 6 glaze that shes makes herself using a recipe called Alfred White. She enjoys creating work that juxtaposes seemingly disparate imagery or ideas, such as the series of urns she created that she intended to be humorous. Of this series, she says,

“What interested me with this series, is by applying the creatures to plates and bowls I was reminded of naturally occurring circumstances where nature takes over man made scenarios. Humans are constantly vying for power against the natural world but we can never quite seem to win. Once I started to create these pieces I then started to notice the same pattern going on in the world around me: moss growing on a concrete wall, barnacles growing on the side of a dock, tufts of grass poking up through cracks in the sidewalk, etc. Maybe I am interested in this series because it is a truer representation of the world we exist in.” (via)

Be sure to check out O’Malley’s Etsy shop, where you can purchase some of her work. She currently lives in New York.

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Lorri Ott

Lorri Ott’s experimental paintings combine unconventional materials such as poured plastics and fibers to create paintings that are fluid both in composition and material.

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Zsolt Molnár Illustrated Poster of Every Episode Of “Breaking Bad”

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S01E01 / Pilot

S02E07 / Negro Y Azul

S02E07 / Negro Y Azul

S02E02 / Grilled

S02E02 / Grilled

S02E08 / Better Call Saul

S02E08 / Better Call Saul

Budapest-based designer Zsolt Molnár created an illustrated poster for every episode of the popular television show, Breaking Bad. It took the designer five months to produce 62 full-color posters, which are minimalist representations of iconic moments in each episode and include an important object or person that’s accompanied by a memorable quote.

If you’ve ever watched Breaking Bad, you’re aware that it’s basically an hour-long anxiety attack. The tension between characters and situations in the show is intense and suspenseful. It takes place in New Mexico, and in every episode we’re inundated with saturated colors of sand and the desert.  Molnár styles his illustrations similarly, like gritty texture with a pop color, like Walt’s green shirt or a destroyed pink teddy bear. They are contained in their compositions, and rely on symbolism of objects and colors in every poster.

Molnár has posted his handiwork on his Tumblr. If you haven’t seen the entire show and don’t want any potential spoilers, then you might want to hold off on scrolling through the his series until you’ve watched it. (Via Buzzfeed)

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Elaine Reicheck Abandons Painting To Create Embroidery Art

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Elaine Reicheck is a New York-based artist who uses embroidery to explore conceptual and aesthetic ideas in art.  Though she has a background in painting, actually receiving an MFA from Yale in the subject, she began to question her training and wonder what kind of statement she wanted to make with her art.  Though she experimented with knitting wool, hand-paining found photographs and other techniques, embroidery emerged as Reicheck’s material of choice.  She creates beautiful works on linen using needle and thread.

Though she does quite a bit of her work by hand, Reichek  also experiments with computerized sewing.  She doesn’t feel this is a shortcut in anyway, as her work is as much about the concept as it is the end result.

There is also an undoubtedly feminist aspect to Reicheck’s work.  She attributes it to working with so many male painters during her training.  Embroidery, a historically feminine pastime, allows Reichek to explore the same ideas as her male painter counterparts, but, as she says, “if I make them that way, of course their meaning changes, since the meaning of an artwork is always bound with its media and processes and their history.”

Usually selecting a theme to base a series around, Reichek’s latest embroiders consider the myth of Ariadne.  Ariadne gave Theseus a ball of thread with which to retrace his steps allowing him to escape the Minotaur’s labyrinth.  Reichek created art-historical portraits, many of which contain Araidne’s image, and paired them with quotes from literary sources such as Nietzsche or Catullus.

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Best of 2011: LORI NIX’S SMALL SCALE WORLDS OF DECAY

These may look like photographs of abandoned buildings but in fact they are photographs of meticulously made dioramas by Lori Nix. Each image is painstakingly created by hand, taking into consideration scale and lighting over the course of seven months. The result is an apocalyptic vision of the world where everything has fallen apart, decayed, and is slowly returning back to nature.

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Phoebe Washburn And Other Artists Who Use Dirt, Grass, Trees And Plants As Artistic Medium

Phoebe Washburn

Phoebe Washburn

Walter De Maria

Walter De Maria

Mathilde Roussel

Mathilde Roussel

Mylyn Nguyen

Mylyn Nguyen

Walter de Maria’s Earth Room, permanently installed at 141 Wooster Street in New York since 1980, is nothing but 250 cubic yards of black soil filling 3,600 square feet.  As Jerry Saltz describes it, it is a “majestic work that gives us bodily confirmations of the power of scale, material, natural phenomena, and art.”  Indeed, Mother Nature’s material can provide a profound art experience that other artists have also experimented with.  Gabriel Kuri uses familiar, everyday materials like newspapers and slabs of grass to focus attention on contemporary consumer culture and the circulation of things like money, information and energy in our global economy.  Ruben Ochoa’s works, specifically his “Overturned Foundations” currently installed at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, alter our relationship to the ground and the wall by shifting our perception of space.  At The Carriage House at The Islip Arts Museum  in 2011 Olivia Kaufman-Rovira  installed a watering system that grew giant grass chandeliers over a six week period.  The grass chandeliers were interspersed with others made of discarded plastic bottles.  The sculptures were meant to comment on resources needed to keep up lawns, how non-biodegradable materials pollute our environment and how important our water supply is.  Phoebe Washburn is a New York artist who incorporates organic matter such as sod or plants into her installations, which act as attempts to exert control over the chaotic.  Mathilde Roussel’s works, often suspended in mid-air, are grass sculptures that represent the growth and decay of life.  Representations of gravity, time and the fragility of existence the works are poetic and beautiful.  Sean Martindale replaced cracked city tree planters in Toronto with grass, making it appear as though it had spilled out over the planter.  A kind of street art, the planters brought beauty and attention to an otherwise damaged part of the city.  Mylyn Nguyen is an Australian artist who gives form to imaginary figures by sculpting natural materials such as moss, pebbles dirt, twigs etc.

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