Get Social:

Basik’s Mystical Street Art

street art9

street art8

 street art1

The street artist Basik has a singular style. Though often sparse in color, his murals don’t lack in detail.  The compositions seem extensively planned.  No component is set without intention as if its precise creation were some sort of ritual.  Basik’s extreme attention to line is rare in the aerosol can wielding medium.  He says of his work:

“I found human and animal bodies, especially hands and weird face expressions, very captivating. I started a research about lines, shapes and solid aspects of the colours. Subjects painted are often idealized and slightly surreal. Strokes become bones, while paint’s matter turns into flesh.  I love to make my works on useless and broken items. Painting becomes more intense and dramatic whilst the support gets a whole new dimension and dignity.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Minimalist Prints Of State Insignia – Strange And Otherwise

Julian Montague design3

Julian Montague design1

Julian Montague design10

 

Perhaps you may be familiar with your state motto or state bird.  However, what about your state amphibian or state grain?  America’s fifty states have many official state insignia, some more obscure than others.  Artist and designer Julian Montague highlights many of these for all of the states in the union in his new series State of America.  While some state insignia may be predictable – Idaho’s official state food is the potato – others are bit stranger such as Georgia’s official state fossil: shark teeth.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Megan Greene Is Morphing

Megan Greene’s meticulous drawings bend, morph, and transform from one texture to the next like a woven embellished creature that is continually on the move.

Currently Trending

Chris Ritson Grows Crystals On The Heads Of Ceramic Sculptures

ritsonsculpture

ritsonsculpture11

ritsonsculpture10

ritsonsculpture7

Chris Ritson combines ceramics with elemental transformation to create these stunning bismuth sculptures. The smoothness and seeming purity of the ceramic form contrasts with the spontaneous explosiveness of the bismuth that emerges from the heads of his subjects, demonstrating a gorgeous dynamism of form and content.

From his artist statement: “Bismuth is an archival element, that under specific, synthetic conditions crystalizes into a distinct hopper shaped crystal form. This crystalline structure of multicolored lattice of cubes within cubes is utilized to simulate the Tesseract, a 4th Dimensional cube. Imagine the Tesseract is to the cube as the cube is to the square. In our thoughts, as well as dreams, we construct a reality within countless imperceivable dimensions, and the realm of the Tesseract is the first that evades our five senses. As artwork is meant to herald a great movement in the viewer into unknown lands of experience, these works are manifestations of the great mythic beacons of ineffable transmissions: Immortal Gods plucked form our literary tradition, all linked to the bridge that connects humans to the imperceivable truths beyond the body.” (via my amp goes to 11)

Currently Trending

Alice

Sawatari’s vision of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” is truly one of the strangest, most out-there interpretations of the well-known story. Risqué in terms of its frank, nude depiction of a youthful Alice, the book’s unintentionally psychedelic tone brings to mind Monty Python, Peter Greenaway, and Vogue Bambini.

 

Currently Trending

Burning Buns: A Lampshade, Made Entirely Out Of Bread

Yukiko Morita- Mixed MediaYukiko Morita- Mixed Media Yukiko Morita- Mixed Media Yukiko Morita- Mixed Media

When Japanese artist Yukiko Morita began working in a bakery as a teenager, she marveled at how cute baked bread was. She probably did not realize at the time that, years later, she would craft a way to make bread into a usable home decorative object.

Introducing her one-of-a-kind Pampshades at Tokyo Designers Week, Morita most certainly has a monopoly on the most glutinous lighting system. Although she declined to name a few secret ingredients, she listed the rest as: “Bread flour, salt, yeast, LED, batteries.” After the bread is baked, she covers it in resin, solidifying the form so it will not decompose.

“As the story goes, Morita worked in a bakery in her native Kyoto eight years ago, subsquently graduating from the Kyoto University of Arts in 2008 and reportedly launching Pampshades as early as 2010 (the name is a portmanteau of ‘pan’—French for bread, derived from the Latinpanem—and lampshade). The brief timeline on her website further notes that the first prototype dates back to 2007 and that she relocated to Kobe as of this year.” (Excerpt from Source and Source)

Currently Trending

Anders Krisar

anderskrisar2

"Sonja"

anderskrisar

"Bomb Suit"

 

 

To keep up my Stockholm-based artists thread, I’m posting the work of Anders Krisar, who has a show up at Union Gallery currently. The top image, “Sonja,” is fabricated from the clothing of a woman who kept every garment from infancy to old age. It’s sort of a strange, corporeal look at time & identity, like the rings of a tree. The second, “Bomb Suit,” depicts an industrial strength bomb suit that has exploded from the inside, the rips of fabric referencing the violence of spilling guts in an uncannily silent & still way. Brings to mind the nature of external/internal turmoil & danger and which poses the biggest threat? Love both these works.

Currently Trending

Standard Operating Procedure

Another gripping documentary recently watched care of Netflix.

 

 

Is it possible for a photograph to change the world? Photographs taken by soldiers in Abu Ghraib prison changed the war in Iraq and changed Americas image of itself. Yet, a central mystery remains. Did the notorious Abu Ghraib photographs constitute evidence of systematic abuse by the American military, or were they documenting the aberrant behavior of a few bad apples?

 

 

Currently Trending