Get Social:

Graham Caldwell’s Prismatic Hand Blown Glass Sculptures Mirror Myopic Organisms

Graham Caldwell - glass Graham Caldwell - glass  Graham Caldwell - glass Graham Caldwell - glass

Graham Caldwell sculpts intricate organic-like structures from hand blown glass. His artworks mirror natural life forms on a molecular level. He pulls, twists, stretches and blows 2,000 degree glass into all sorts of shapes, arranging them into globular, spiky, prismatic, concave, convex, and densely myopic configurations. Caldwell uses the hard shiny metallic properties of glass in contrast to the forms he is recreating. He references nature – flowers, leaves, tropical fronds, water drops, fly’s eyes and eyebrows, but chooses to present them in a man-made, futuristic, fractured, cubist fashion.

Using mirrors, metals, steel and epoxy he likes us to reflect on the way we see the world around us. His interest lies in the act of perceiving, the function of eyes, the purpose of lenses, and how sight works.

Much of my work focuses on glass as a conduit or modulating agent for light and its parallel in the functionality of the human eye: using a lens to flip an image of the world, upside down and backwards, into the brain where it is reassembled, through illusion and forensics. (Source)

Caldwell is the ultimate advocate for art as science. His process is all about trying to recreate an organic process through a completely manufactured one. He enjoys the tactility of glass and the bizarre shapes they can inhabit.

Imagine the shape that balloons take on when they’re half filled with water; now imagine them flash-frozen and sticking sideways into space. Glass, says Caldwell, “is a slowed-down, meaty version of water.” (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Artist Survey: Free Sketchbook & Discount Code

Deadline: August 3rd, 2009 6:00pm PST

Have you ever wished that your favorite brand of black pens came in different sizes? Or that paint wasn’t so expensive? Or that spray paint came in a wider variety of colors? Beautiful/Decay would like to share a survey that offers the creative community a chance to change the way art materials are packaged, sold and priced. And, there are perks for your time and wisdom! 500 artists will be randomly selected to receive a free sketchbook, and, ALL participants will receive an exclusive discount offer of 15% their next purchase from Jerry’s Artarama art supplies.

Please click on the below link to participate in a short survey:

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Eric Cahan And The Science Of Light

 

Intrigued by the power and nostalgia of Nature, New York based artist Eric Cahan has been devoting his time to long journeys, willing to observe and study the behavior of sun light and its impact on earth.

Cahan´s main project “Sky Series” invites you to get absorbed by unique shots of the sunrise and sunset, enigmatic and mysterious pieces titled only by location and time. Each photography is a visual and spiritual souvenir that captures a magic hour, a perfect and harmonious glow of natural light.

Currently Trending

MATHWRATH

ONLINE DATING

ONLINE DATING

AKA, the summation of my love affair with the internet. I saw this site on Rhizome.org 6 months ago, truly loved it for a day, forgot about it for a little bit, then wasn’t able to find it again and instantly regretted it (I remembered it as “MATHLAB” instead of “MATHWRATH”). Fortunately I was able to reunite with it yesterday when I saw it on VVork. I feel as if a part of my life has come full circle…

Currently Trending

Daniel Lai’s Contemplative Sculpture Made from Books

 

Nice wall-mounted sculptures made from books by Tennessee via Malaysia artist Daniel Lai. The sculptures feature clay figures in “Thinker” poses positioned amongst artfully folded leaves from various books. These capture the quiet, contemplative mind-space brought on by a good read, and would make good company in any studio, study, or living room. The Internet and tablet readers are alright, but there’s something about print that just can’t be beat. Always up for a good tribute to ink on paper. (via)

Currently Trending

Shelly Mosman’s Intensely Personal Portraits

Shelly MosmanShelly MosmanShelly MosmanfinalC

The strength of the portraiture tradition, and what separates it from documentary photography, lies in the skill of the photographer to attach meaning and the essence of the person in a simple image. Using metaphor, subtlety, and open-ended but vaguely familiar narrative, photographer Shelly Mosman is able to imbue an intensely personal and soft-spoken beauty to her photographs. Drawn to subjects for reasons she says she often cannot immediately describe, Mosman spends a great deal of time with her subjects, waiting for key moments when their personality is revealed through action, or the subtlest of looks or gestures. “Portraiture relies on the smallest mannerisms and expressions to offer narrative,” says Mosman, “I rely on the spontaneity of circumstance.” 

The Minneapolis-based portraitist continues:

“In my photographs I negotiate and characterize the balance between my own vision and the unknown and often powerful potential given by each portrait’s subject. I am drawn to certain people for the simple reason that I know shooting them will give me an image I could never have created on my own, and because my camera can reveal something they may not have known was in themselves.  It becomes a synthesis of us both, captured in a single photograph. These connections with each subject are often too straightforward and immediate to be conscious, but rather they are something that is felt immediately, coming straight from the gut, which is the home of our instincts.”

Mosman is currently in the midst of a Kickstarter campaign to raise money for an upcoming exhibition titled Mercury. The show will feature new black and white works, printed with a long-standing (though rarely used) silver gelatin contact technique, overseen by a master printer. They will then be framed in a specially designed cast resin frames, the results of a collaboration with two sculptors. For more information or to donate, click here.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Peter Doig

Peter Doig’s dreamlike narrative paintings are based on photographs but never painted in a photorealist style. In this video Doig gives viewers a behind the scenes look at his 2008 show at the Tate Britian. Sharing stories about the creation of various works, Peter discusses how a new painting was left outside in the rain to get  stains and also shares a suitcase full of reference images that were used to make the paintings. Watch the full video after the jump.

Currently Trending

Erika Sanada’s Grotesque Yet Poignant Creatures Give Face To A Child’s Fears

7860649_orig2227831_orig3398589_orig1422242_orig

Erika Sanada’s imaginary creatures toe the line between the grotesque and the adorable; inspired by her childhood trauma and memories of bullying, the artist delves into her deepest anxieties, plucking out tiny hairless ceramic beasts, each of whom appears strangely misshapen by a nervous sort of womb. As a girl, Sanada imagined transforming her tormenters into hideous monsters, presented here as birds and rats with twin heads or dogs that display infinite rows of glinting teeth.

As if stolen from a perverse Eden, Sanada’s endearing beasts are as innocent as they are frightful. “Newborns” introduces a trinity of puppy-rat hybrids, who, despite their sharp claws and thick, bald tails, elicit our sympathies; their soft, tender eyes have yet to open, and the tiniest of baby tongues pokes out of a toothless mouth. Similarly, a hairless beast crawls across a platform, leaving a trail of sticky epoxy that resembles amniotic fluid. He has two tails, each fleshy and naked, and yet he is so poignantly small and delicate that we yearn to comfort and protect him as he makes a perilous journey into the adult world.

As if possessed, Sanada’s cast of characters, whom she charmingly refers to as “Odd Things,” reveal black marble-white eyes, absent of pupils or irises, the effect of which is wonderfully unsettling. As we confront these magical manifestations of our most secret fears, they stare back invisibly, tracking us not with sight but with an intractable knowledge of our own vulnerabilities. Take a look. (via KoiKoiKoi)

Currently Trending