Get Social:

Tom Bingham’s Portraits

Loving this series of portraits by Tom Bingham. At first glance they seem a bit clunky but I think it adds a bit of charm. Check out the great details like the chest hair. I’m hoping the image above is Chuck Norris. More portraits and a few animations after the jump!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Donna Ruff’s Hand-Cut Newspapers

Donna Ruff lives and works in New York. With her local paper as a starting point, she makes intricate repetitive cuts until an elaborate pattern emerges. The result resembles ornamental doilies and other textiles. Because she is doing this to current newspapers one could read into the work as a comment on censorship and alteration of truth within national news. From her bio: “Using unconventional techniques to make densely patterned drawings that refer to calligraphy and natural forms, she finds beauty and inspiration in sacred texts such as the Torah and the Qur’an, but also in the New York Times and the Manhattan phone book; in cathedrals, mosques and synagogues, but also in the warehouses of Chicago and Brooklyn.” (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Manon Wethly’s Flying Beverages

Manon Wethly photography3 Manon Wethly photography6

Manon Wethly photography2

Photographer and designer Manon Wethly has been experimenting with a series of photographs that is almost certainly as fun to shoot as it is to look at.  Wethly flings beverages of all sorts into the air and photographs the flying liquid.  The floating globs of wine, juice, coffee, and milk which are in midair for a moment are instead frozen for a single image.  These flying spills resemble abstract glass sculptures.  They’re color against the blue sky and swirling shapes make these “accidents” artful.  [via]

Currently Trending

Francisco de Pájaro Creates Endearingly Twisted Monsters Out Of Curbside Trash

Francisco de Pájaro, Art is Trash - Installation Francisco de Pájaro, Art is Trash - Installation Francisco de Pájaro, Art is Trash - Installation Francisco de Pájaro, Art is Trash - Installation

In cities around the world, trash has started to take on a new face—literally. In the middle of the night, street artist Francisco de Pájaro has been adorning garbage with fiendish faces and gangly limbs. His collage materials include stuffed plastic bags, abandoned mattresses, and soiled cardboard—anything that has been left on the curb to rot. The result is a cast of absurd, endearingly twisted (and occasionally perverted) monsters that populate the streets in various states of exuberant disarray until they are swept off by a garbage truck.

Accompanying each site-specific creation is de Pájaro’s signature statement: “Art is Trash,” referring to his subversively creative celebration of human debris. Garbage—the output of our material, earthly lives—is usually a miserable sight, symptomatic of our obsessive consumption and the processes of decay. By bringing humor to such unpleasant sights, de Pájaro allows pedestrians in London, Barcelona, New York and more to engage with trash in a more thought-provoking way—one that playfully criticizes consumerism and examines our fear of death and abjection. As the artist’s about page describes,

“Art Is Trash is the hypnotic hand that resuscitates the cadavers of hyper consumerism—the trash—back to fruition in our current, material, state of consciousness. The process behind every installation is a ritual, similar to a shamanic one. A ritual of connection with Mother Nature, where [the] life of matter is a cycle that never ends. Francisco’s work reflects the analogy that exists between the life cycle of the objects and that of physical bodies. Both never cease to exist. They continue to live in parallel realities. The cadavers of consumerism live a new life in the urban, artistic realm.” (Source)

“Art is Trash” is currently on tour in New York. Check out the artist’s website to see which streets his moldering-yet-merry creations will be inhabiting next. De Pájaro also recently published a book documenting this project. (Via Design Faves)

Currently Trending

Winners

593a_1228269137-copy593b_1228269137Allison Wermager’s trophies for excellent artistic performance. Perhaps the saying ‘the sincerest form of flattery is mockery’ applies here.

Currently Trending

Kelly Nicolaisen’s Photographs Punch Color Into Everyday Life

San Francisco basked photographer Kelly Nicolaisen’s boldly colored images splash electric colors into everyday scenes and mundane situations. Creating quirky narratives that range from the playful to the absurd, Nicholaisen’s fresh takes on life create a sense of irony and humor by reversing the usual gestalt expectation that the figure is always at the foreground.

Currently Trending

Faig Ahmed Reimagines Traditional Azerbaijani Carpets

Faig Ahmed Faig Ahmed Faig Ahmed

With a serious understanding of classic carpet-making techniques, Azerbaijani sculptor Faig Ahmed is able to stretch, distort and reinvent an iconic symbol steeped in tradition and cultural significance. “The carpet is a symbol of invincible tradition of the East, it’s a visualization of an undestroyable icon,” Ahmed states, noting that the manipulation of the woven medium gives visual form to ideas he has relating to “destroying the stereotypes of tradition to create new modern boundaries.” The rug, as a medium, works well for Ahmed, helping to deploy a deeper message about the stretching, bending and restructuring of physical and political boundaries in the Middle East. His technical mastery is evident in the movements of each thread, and his generous use of color gives the work an overall vibrancy—perhaps hinting at the artist’s sense of optimism in a time of great uncertainty and turmoil.

Currently Trending

Daniel St. George’s Collage Pop

Daniel St. George is a fine artist living in Brooklyn, NY who has steadily amassed a body of work that is equal parts entertaining, eclectic, and engrossing. St. George  blends elements of collage, printmaking, painting, and drawing  to create clever inverted representations of classic cartoon and pop icons; often placed into dynamic interaction with a found paperback leaf or music score in a personal, methodical context that is all his own.

Currently Trending