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James Boock’s Machine Transforms Earthquakes Into Art

Industrial designer James Boock, along with the design team of Josh Newsome-White, Brooke Bowers, Hannah Warren, George Redmond, Richie Stewart and Philippa Shipley designed and built the Quakescape 3D Fabricator.  The fabricator uses earthquake data to visually represent the natural disaster.  The machine retrieves the earth quake data which is then transformed into paint formations.  Different color paint (representing different intensities of an earthquake) are poured onto the appropriate locations of a cross section of Christchurch, New Zealand.  The wet paint flows down mountains, pooling in valleys, further transforming the raw information into art.

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Last Day to get 20% off All Prints!

Today is the last day to take advantage of this sale!

Beautiful/Decay is happy to announce new sizing for our artist prints. You can now buy each of our gorgeous prints, designed by a whose-who cast of international designers, at a new small size of 8″ x 10.6″. Each print is produced on a heavy, high quality, archival stock that’s ready for framing. To celebrate our new small size we are giving all of our prints an extra small price! All prints in all sizes are 20% off until Sunday September 4th at Midnight (PST). Just use discount code “coveryourwalls” during check out and start decorating your home, office, and walls today!

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Accumulonimbus

In Andy Kennedy‘s Accumulonimbus, natural and man-made objects on a spin cycle accumulate, disintegrate, and multiply. Created by stop motion animating clay on glass, the film is a meditation on motion and the life cycle of matter… Awesome! Check out the making of post here.

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Want to Be Inspired? Subscribe To The Beautiful/Decay Book Series

We all need a bit of inspiration every once in a while. Whether you’re having a bad day in the studio or looking to add some art into your life the Beautiful/Decay Book series is the ultimate collection of art & design curated by us for you to enjoy. So get creative, get inspired, and join us in our mission to document, promote, and share the best creative minds from around the world. In other words join the cult of decay and subscribe now!

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7 Days Left Until B/D Business Card Giveaway Ends!

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There are only 7 days left until the deadline for the Beautiful/Decay Business Card Giveaway! So don’t forget to send us your most creative business card ideas!

One piece of advice we impart to our interns at Beautiful/Decay is that a well-designed, professional business card is one of the most critical tools anyone seeking a job can have- especially in the creative field! So, Beautiful/Decay is presenting a competition to see who can design the best business card for themselves and/or their business. Please send us your most innovative, eye-catching card graphics! The most creative card will win 500 free cards printed courtesy of UPrinting.com! (Note: We will be posting the winners on the blog–so if you don’t want your personal information broadcasted please also send a version of the file with dummy text.)

Deadline: July 28th, 2009 6:00pm PST

Guidelines:
-Email submissions to: [email protected] with the subject line: Business Card Contest
-Format is 2 x 3.5″
-Business card graphic includes front & back, full color
-Winner may select any paper type
-For all template & file specification requirements please visit UPrinting’s guidelines.

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The Original Video Pizza

video pizza spence & ziggyAre you ready for love?  Are you prepared for savage, unbridled, intense, ultra mega romance?  Then you might be suave enough to handle this “one of a kind way to spend the evening.”  Photographer Robbie Augspurger (who was featured in Book 3) sent us a DVD of The Original Video Pizza.  Needless to say, Ziggy and I were excited to enjoy “the soothing sound of sizzling” in a pizza-filled hour of pure retro rawness.   The DVD case is just as amazing as the actual video, featuring a quote from Rope McCord, who simply states that he loves pizza movies.  Not only does Video Pizza add “the perfect ambience to any party experience” but also, there are “no pizza boxes to clean up” and “no waiting for it to be ready”.  The party of a lifetime is waiting for you… after the jump.

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Sculptural Portraits Made From The DNA Left On Your Trash

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Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg‘s project, Stranger Visions, is a wonderful mix of science and art.  Dewey-Hagborg turns a poetic attention to the seemingly innocuous artifacts of life: a hair, chewed gum, a cigarette butt.  Beyond sight, though, the DNA remains of each unique person inhabits these “artifacts”.  She picks up these remains up throughout Brooklyn and brings them to a nearby biology lab.  Dewey-Hagborg extracts the DNA from the object, then information from the DNA.  She runs the information through a program she has written herself that is able to determine physical features such as eye color, hair color, gender, nose width, and so on.  That information is then exported to a 3D color printer to create a sculptural portrait of the unwitting donor.  [via]

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Eric Lafforgue Documents The Intricate Scarification Practices Of Ethiopia’s Omo Valley Tribes

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French photographer Eric Lafforgue has dedicated his craft to documenting various cultures around the world, from Panama to North Korea and beyond. In this particular series, titled “Scarifications Ethiopiennes,” Lafforgue provides a close-up view on the scarification practices of Ethiopia’s Omo Valley tribes, including the Bodi, Suri, and Mursi peoples. Lafforgue traveled throughout the region, visiting the locals and observing their cutting ceremonies. In stunning detail, Lafforgue provides images of the scars—both healed and in process—as well as ethnographic descriptions and insights into the scars’ social and ritualistic purposes.

Among these peoples, scarification plays an important role in tribal life. Patterned lines and dots are embedded into the skin using thorns and razors—a process that one of his photographic subjects, a teenage girl, confesses to being very painful. But enduring the pain holds several social significances: the Suri people see it as a sign that the participant will be able to endure childbirth, while the Mursi embrace it as a mark of beauty and strength (Source). While some urban Ethiopians view scarification as a sign of “primitivism,” for many it remains a valuable signifier of cultural belonging.

Lafforgue’s oeuvre is impressive, spanning the globe several times over. His works can be viewed on his website and Facebook page.

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