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rabinal

dbp13ts - period 13 attractor by rabinal

Not sure what the process is, or what we’re looking at, but the official response to “….How…?” is: “This is a typical electronic chaotic system. The circuits and block diagram are published elsewhere in this set. It shows a stable “chaotic transient” which at some irregular time (from one run to the next) eventually falls into a trap. It is supposed to indicate what may happen to the planet’s climate patterns in the future, although it is not likely in that case that the trap region will be so regular. In this system the timing of the trapping event is unpredictable.” Flickr user rabinal insists that it’s not art, though…. We beg to differ.

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Arturo Oliva Pedroza

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Los Angeles artist Arturo Oliva Pedroza produces the kind of photography I love. That grainy, seemingly accidental snap shot that you can’t stop staring at. Pedroza’s genius lies in capturing these quiet, easily overlooked moments of beauty that smack you in the face with their simplicity and honesty. Picking up a pizza on that cold walk home from the bar can be magic–if you let it be.

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Glitch Landscapes

 
In 1988 at the age of nine Tyson Skross moved with his family from suburban Texas to Geneva, Switzerland. Living there, wedged between the largest, most mysterious lake in Western Europe and the Swiss Alps with their historical relationship with romanticism, he witnessed many unusual natural phenomenon. These incidents, which he refers to as “glitches”, opened his mind to the fallacy of reality and also solidified his deep attachment to indefinite geography.

 

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Tobias Hutzler’s Creates Sculptural ‘Objects’ With Live Human Bodies

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Tobias Hutzler, a photographer / director based in New York City, creates photographs that showcase sculpture-like forms outlined by live human bodies. The unusual portraits, (because I have no idea of what else to call them) feature men and women in skin toned underwear, posing on top, near, and next to each other in strange, and involved poses.

It is interesting to note that Hutzler instructs his subjects to pose in intricate positions with in each other on top of a stand (one that would usually hold a sculpture in a museum/gallery space). This detail further assures the viewer that he/she is indeed witnessing a sculpture of some sort. Hutzler is also interested in portraying ‘different shades of color’, meaning that he includes people of varied skin tonalities, and I assume, different nationalities as well.

Hutzler creates these large-scale photographs by using a unique technical approach, resulting in images that are printed as they are shot, without manipulation. Photographing with small-scale digital sensors, Hutzler achieves a distinctive digital noise quality, allowing for the characteristics of raw digital technique to have a powerful effect on the final photograph.

“This photographic approach builds tension between the large-scale scenes and the digital noise and fragments, resulting in an aesthetic beauty of its own, contrary to aiming for higher resolutions and dynamic range. My photography is searching for a truth between the aesthetic of the medium and the subject matter of the image.”

(via Inhale Mag)

Hutzler creates his large-scale photographs with a unique technical approach, resulting in images that are printed as they are shot, without manipulation or compositing. Photographing with small-scale digital sensors, Hutzler achieves a distinctive digital noise quality, allowing for the characteristics of raw digital technique to have a powerful effect on the final photograph. “This photographic approach builds tension between the large-scale scenes and the digital noise and fragments, resulting in an aesthetic beauty of its own, contrary to aiming for higher resolutions and dynamic ranges,” says Hutzler. “My photography is searching for a truth between the aesthetic of the medium and the subject matter of the image.” (via art daily)

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Marc Sparfel’s Animal Sculptures Made Out Of Abandoned Furniture

When French Sculptor Marc Sparfel comes across a stack of old furniture on the street he gets excited. Not because someone has just updated their home decor but because he has now gained a pile of materials for his charming animal sculptures.  Sparfel’s process is intuitive allowing curved chair rails to be come horns on a bull, a chair back to become elephant ears, and gilded couch legs to turn into a torso. The results are a poetic take on the mysterious animals that we live amongst using discarded materials that most of us wouldn’t think twice about using again. (via)

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A Hole In The Place Of Heart

When the violence of individuals generates the birth of a strange collective monster, anything is possible… A surrealist vision of inhumanity.
PS. this was all done with sand animation!

PSS. By David Myriam

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Artist Knits Herself A Boyfriend

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In a world of online matchmaking and social media, the artist Noortje de Keijzer offers a simpler option: an art piece and product entitled My Knitted Boyfriend, a knit pillowcase that comes to life when stuffed. In this witty critique of modern dating and expectations, My Knitted Boyfriend eliminates all the messy parts of a human relationship, conforming to individual preferences; he will enjoy whatever you enjoy, and he “can be adjusted to your own tastes” with the use of accessories like facial hair, tattoos, or glasses.

Although humorous in its somewhat cynical outlook on modern love, the piece is unexpectedly sentimental. The boyfriend himself comes along with an illustrated book narrating the story of de Keijzer and her cuddly lover, much like children’s picture books that include a stuffed animal. Also like a children’s storybook, the text and illustration follows a simple, nostalgic format: we are told that they “sleep together” and are offered an innocent sketch of the pair doing just that. The boyfriend, though he is not real, becomes a precious manifestation of the fictional—or imaginary—friend that enchants the young mind.

Complicating the delightfully sweet story of the artist and her beau is the work’s clever take on the domestic theme. As seen in her charming short film, the relationship is build not around professional ambition or the public realm; instead, they eat breakfast and watch movies. In fact, the man himself is knitted and therefore associated with the home. This 1950s-style domestic romanticism is brilliantly complicated and subverted by the fact that the male and not the female here is the homemaker; in place of the mid-century ideal of the perfect wife, My Knitted Boyfriend is that crucial element that makes a house a home. In the artist’s own astute words to her knitted partner, “You fit in my interior perfectly.” (via Design Boom)

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Design Month: Qui est Paul?

Qui est Paul? We may never truly know who he is but apparently he’s got very good taste in outdoor furniture. The French firm’s designs boasts bubbly, slick and upbeat pieces that fit just as well in a home as a five star resort. I especially love the Sardana seating that wraps around a tree and can be lit from the inside.

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