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Tim Noble And Sue Webster’s British Rubbish


Tim Noble And Sue Webster make art that directly addresses the waste and aesthetic vulgarity of advanced consumerism and repositions the litter and gaudiness as a powerful visual allegory of human mortality, love and hope. The duo’s recent monograph British Rubbish, showcases their work from 1996 to present day in all its meticulously crafted glory— including the die cut book cover itself revealing the portraits of the artists.

Extravagant, irreverent, and always sharply clever, British Rubbish is both a paean to and sly denunciation of conspicuous consumption.

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KAHN & SELESNICK’s Sci-Fi Landscapes

KAHN + SELESNICK - Photography

Surreal photography by Khan & Selesnick.

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Benjamin Shine’s Stunning Portraits Made Entirely From One Folded Sheet Of Tulle



The artist Benjamin Shine’s tulle creations look as if they have emerged from a thick fog; by folding and ironing the ethereal fabric into place, he constructs both realistic portraits and more expressionistic renderings of the human face. For each piece, the artist uses a single sheet of fabric, folding it in upon itself to create layered and nuanced shades of blue, black, magenta, and topaz.

With his enchanting, moody fabric tableaux, Shine makes a unique contribution to modern artistic dialogue. As with the modernists and the Impressionists, the materiality of the work is as significant as its content; as Edgar Degas’s spontaneous brushstrokes realize a ballerina’s tutu, so too does Shine’s delicate fabric render the tender lips and eyelids of the female face.

Despite the creative approach and unusual medium, the artist magically maintains a jarringly realistic gaze, nearly replicating famous photographs of glamorous icons like Princess Diana and Elizabeth Taylor. Where his use of tulle is spontaneous and modern, the actual images are surprisingly conventional; while the Impressionists may have painted en plein air, Shine sticks to traditional portrait subject matter, like posed celebrities. This unexpected marriage of edgy technique with established content results in a truly mesmerizing project, one which occupies an interesting space in contemporary aesthetic conversations.

Only in Shine’s more expressionistic works, titled the Tulle Flows, do we dive head first into the daring medium; here, as the tulle unfolds according to its own natural momentum, faces give way to abstracted shapes. Here, human subjects appear as if they are looking out from behind a veil, like invisible creatures pressing their faces against a foggy cloud. Take a look. (via My Modern Met and Demilked)

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Michael Wolf’s Hypnotic Photographs Document Hong Kong’s Architectural Density

Michael Wolf Michael Wolf photography Michael Wolf photos

For his series, “The Architecture of Density,” German photographer Michael Wolf captures the intense suffocating density of the city of Hong Kong. The framing of the buildings and apartment units creates a flattened, patterned image with details of individual residencies apparent only on closer inspection. The result is an abstraction that gives the appearance of infinity, as if these incredibly compact and dense structures never end. Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in the world, with an overall density of around 6,700 people per square kilometer, a fact you may recall from a previously featured photography series of the city’s cramped slums.

Wolf’s work is primarily concerned with urban landscapes and places, not always in such an objective, distanced manner. His series, Tokyo Compression, captures Tokyo subway users’ faces pressed up onto the glass of the subway car, a result of the overcrowding of this form of transportation. No matter the proximity to his subjects, Wolf offers a new perspective on the movement and energy of city life in his documentation of its density. (via curious history)

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Ill-Studio’s Greatest Abilities



Whether it’d be through art or design, France is the top destination to go to for any interested in construction and ingenuity with an urge for color experimention. Ill-Studio (founded in 2007) truly belongs to this cognition. Ill represents a collective of talented individuals headed by Léonard Vernhet and Thomas Subreville under one pretty ‘sick’ name.  The group experiments with shapes (a combination of both geometric and organic), thin and thick lines, and bold color saturation. Art-direction, photography, design, motion design, and typography are their greatest abilities; to describe the least.

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Ben Tegel,  Helter Skelter 1, 2008
22″ x 30″,  ink on paper

Welcome to the second week of Click To Collect, Beautiful/Decay’s new campaign to help art lovers start their collection of original artists works at affordable prices. Our second featured artist is Ben Tegel whose gorgeously rendered drawings have graced the pages of our print publication, apparel, and website dozens of times. Ben’s iconic Helter Skelter drawing which depicts the faces of Charles manson through the ages was one of the most popular  Beautiful/Decay t-shirt graphics ever made. Now you can purchase the original piece and add it to your collection today! See the rest of the available work by Ben Tegel and read more about our Click To Collect project after the jump!

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David Mach’s Mind-Blowing Sculptures Made Of Metal Coat Hangers


Scottist sculptor David Mach has a penchant for unexpected materials: magazines, matchsticks, and scrabble pieces, to name a few. In his series “Coathangers,” the artist constructs lifelike animals from wire hangers, allowing the pointed metal hooks to extend past the boundaries of the figure. To build these strange cacti-like creatures, Mach works from a plastic mold, applies the hangers, and coats the finished product in nickel.

Mach’s wild beasts, depicted with near realism, look magnificently aggressive when protruding hooked metal. Like defensive porcupines, the seem to be coated in a layer of quills, warding off the touch of curious viewers. The tiger, the stag, and the gorilla each occupies a distinct role in the hierarchy of the natural world; their predator limbs frozen outstretched or fearful mouths held open, they cannot help but resemble the taxidermied animals that roam the halls of natural history museums. Unlike those passive creatures, however, Mach’s animal kingdom is electrified with the addition shining, threatening spokes, eliciting trepidation as much as they do curiosity. Similarly, the artist’s crucifixion presents Jesus Christ as an explosive, angry being, emitting in his pain an agonized cry; here, we might imagine the biblical lines, “My God, why hast though forsaken me?”

Mach’s coat hanger method allows for the rules of sculpture to be broken; his figures are defined not by their enclosed form but also by material that emanates from their bodies as we understand them. Like characters on a static-filled television, they appear as illusions or mirages. Their blurry boundaries allow them to exist in a mysterious space beyond the corporeal. Are these creatures inhabiting the space before us, or are they merely projections, subject to vanishing at any moment? (via Visual News)

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