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Micaela Lattanzio’s Photo Mosaics Shatter Portraits Into Bits And Pieces

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mosaic photo mosaic Micaela Lattanzio - Mixed Media

Micaela Lattanzio creates works of art that go beyond the traditional forms of photography. This collection, called “Frammentazioni,” shatters photos into bits and pieces, enabling Lattanzio to play with space and texture. Her mosaic-esque pieces contain a sort of kinetic energy, suggesting form and movement in a subtle way.

Like other types of art that use human features, it’s hard not to assign emotion to Lattanzio’s work. She literally uses human images as jig saw pieces, evoking a sort of psychological depth that could be read as anxious or even playful.

Some of Lattanzio’s works are use the various pieces of photographs as pixels, rearranging them around each other but maintaining some semblance of the original shape. Other pieces lace together long stripes, looking like the result of two inkjet printers communing  (via Hi-Fructose)

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Jim Lambie Interview

As a musician myself I am always fascinated by the intersection between visual art and music. Jim Lambie is a musician who played in the Glasgow band Teenage Fanclub, and was also shortlisted for the Turner prize. His colorful installations often reappropriate pop cultural items in fresh ways. In this video he discusses his installation “Zobop,” which used vinyl tape on the floorspace of the Tate, to reveal the idiosyncrasies in the architecture in a dazzling floor display. Check out the Bay City Rollers album in his studio!

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Virtual Transgender Suit

Marc Owens designed the Avatar Machine, a system which replicates the aesthetics and visuals of third person gaming, allowing the user to view themselves as a virtual character in real space via a head mounted interface. 

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Jonathan Robert LeBlanc

Landscape photography is a fickle mistress.  Jonathan Robert LeBlanc’s photographs weave an elaborate tapestry of cramped urban decay and endless country skies- facing history with little or no irony.

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Zhe Chen Documents Her Own Self-Harm

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Zhe Chen‘s confessional photographic series “The Bearable” has spanned a few years (2007 – 2010) and is a deeply personal journey of her own experiences with self harm. Her frank photos are very confrontational as she forces us to examine our own comfortability with such a terse subject. The close ups of bruised and battered skin, weeping nipples, bloodied and soiled sheets are not easily digestible images. In fact they are so hard to ignore, and are so powerful, that they immediately break down the taboos of any open discussion surrounding this subject. She says this about her work:

‘I hope my photographs inquire upon society’s prejudice and preconception towards this community, and not become illustrations or pictorial evidence for the topic at hand: every subject is an individual, not just ‘one of them’ – his or her life cannot be predicted or dictated by any constructed social code or notion. Depression plants the seed of introspection. I hope a first glance of my work conveys the idea of secrecy and sentiments, under which lies information awaiting exposure and recognition: like an index page pointing towards all the unanswered questions.’ (Source)

The L.A. based, Chinese artist teamed “The Bearable” series of her own self-mutilation with another, titled “The Bees“. Approaching the same subject from a different angle, she features a marginalized group of people in China who are so downtrodden and alienated that they feel the need to express their emotional oppression outwardly on their own bodies. Understanding the need for self-harm is such a complex story that most people tiptoe around, Chen wants to put it directly in front of us and see how we react.(Via Feature Shoot)

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Mini Tokyo Comes Alive With 3D Mapping Projection

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This miniature city is a carefully modeled Tokyo at 1:1,000 scale.  The Roppongi Hills skyscraper, dominant in the Tokyo skyline, celebrates its 10th anniversary by creating this model titled Tokyo City Symphony.  In addition to being intricately detailed, the model Tokyo is accompanied by a 3D mapping projection set to a corresponding soundtrack.  The projection brings the metropolis to life adding an impressive level of reality to the tiny Tokyo.  Check out the video to see Tokyo City Symphony in action.

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Anne Ten Donkelaar’s Delicate “Repaired” Butterflies

Artist Anne Ten Donkelaar‘s series Broken Butterflies takes its inspiration from a children’s book.  According to the story, because of his dream to create a mix between a flower and a bird, the protagonist Arno is banished to an insect workshop.  In a way, Donkelaar works from her own insect workshop.  She says:

“I had my own collection of damaged butterflies, so I decided to repair each one differently according to their needs. So in a way, I now have my own workplace with butterflies and give the butterflies a second life.”

Much of her work begins with objects that are often overlooked.  Infusing them with renewed attention and narrative, Donkelaar then reintroduces the object to the viewer.

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Melissa Cooke Drawings of beauty, fantasy, And Violence

Melissa Cooke’s accomplished powdered graphite on paper works explore themes of beauty, fantasy, violence, vulnerability and identity, with the artist casting herself as subject in a myriad of thematic scenarios.

 ” I take photographs as I paint and pour liquids onto myself, using my face as a canvas.  The photo shoots reference the practice of drawing and painting; then the final graphite drawing references photography.  The boundaries between the mediums are broken down and the processes are interwoven.

The images depart from the framing of traditional portraiture.  The viewer is not given an entire bust of the subject; rather the frame zooms into up-close sections of the face.  The cropping pushes the face to the surface of the paper, making the figure more ambiguous.  Flesh becomes abstracted: obliterated by paint on the skin, distorted by the eye of the camera lens, or smeared by the glass of a Xerox machine.

Photographs are used as inspiration for drawing and mark making.  The drawings are made by dusting thin layers of graphite onto paper with a dry brush.  The softness of the graphite provides a smooth surface that can be augmented by erasing in details.  Gestural marks are apparent, while still creating dimension.  Textures are given precedence over portraying a likeness to the figure.   The act of drawing becomes the focus.”

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