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Lucy Glendinning’s Strange And Beautiful Feathered Figures

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

British sculptor Lucy Glendinning creates  ‘Feather Child’, a bird-like, human-like  creature. This strange project originates from Glendinning’s fascination with personal visions, expectations and fears about the future of a highly technologically advanced society. ‘Feather Child’, acting as a semiotic medium,  specifically embodies Glendinning’s questions about the future of genetic manipulation in such a world. The feathers, apart from making a point about what a possible genetically manipulated being might look like, are also a reference to the classic tale of human hubris: Greek mythology’s Icarus.

The feathered child begs its spectator to ponder upon the reality of such fantastical but absurd creations in a world where this will most certainly become a possibility. Will we be able to resist altering our physical abilities and looks if we had to ability to change them? Furthermore, will we, like Icarus, defy our abilities, change them, and as a consequence have everything we worked for fall apart?

Time will only tell what the future has in store for us. (via IGNANT)

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Kenji Fujita

I love Kenji Fujita’s wonky little plaster-cast combinations. They’re kind of weird, but also free spirited, organic and a bit humorous- with titles like “Debris of Life and Mind.” Heavy…..but funny. That’s a lot of debris. Kenji Fujita will be showing his works from the last 9 years at Samson Gallery, entitled “Systematic Gaiety” from February 6- March 21st. A pretty great title to describe Fujita’s controlled whimsical chaos.

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Fabian Oefner’s Gravity Induced Paint Explosions Create Liquid Orchids

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when captured from the side, you can see how the individual layers of paint appear out of the white surface.

Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner’s latest “Orchid” series of paint actions depicts the ephemeral nature of gravity and fluid paint, frozen in time. In each image Oefner captures a fleeting moment with his camera which appear to look like sculptural floral blooms when in fact they are explosions of paint set into motion by gravity.

In his unique process Oefner filled a tank with several layers of different colors of liquid paint with the top layer being either black or white. Then, a sphere was thrown into the paint. As the falling object splashed into the tank, the paint was forced upwards, shaping the individual layers of paint into a blossom-like structure.

“Orchid” is about preserving ephemeral beauty. Photographed with high speed devices, these images capture structures of sublime elegance, which appear only for a fraction of a second before disappearing beneath the surface again. (via designboom)

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Jen Mussari

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Jen Mussari is a Pennsylvania native fine artist, illustrator, typographer, and maker of DIY handmade art. She is now at MICA in Baltimore working on her BFA. Check out her new series of hand printed poster series called Very Important Posters, which are a combination of  hand-drawn typography and minimal illustration to communicate varied messages.  These messages range from critical to welcoming, comical to concerned.  You can collect all eight on her ETSY store!

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Gal Weinstein’s Sculpture of Burning Tires, Explosions, and Wasteland

 

Gal Weinstein, based in Tel Aviv, does some really cool sculptures. Burning tires, mosaic explosions, sputtering chimneys- this stuff is hard to ignore. Some people feel that we’re closer to the apocalypse now then we ever have been, whether it’s brought on by our own means or otherwise. Weinstein’s work often illustrates a sparse, unforgiving wasteland full of smoke and red brick. Even the sculptures that depict elements of life are disconnected, removed. Farm plots are reduced to tiny, green squares. The closest we get to humans are rows of stoic Foosball figures. But somehow there’s still hope in the artist’s work, which holds color and intrigue. (via)

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Studio Bertjan Pot’s Rope Masks

Studio Bertjan Pot likes to experiment. they pride themselves on picking up a new material and pushing the boundaries of what it’s intended to be used for. Such is the case of these wonderful masks that were created during an attempt to make carpets. (via baubauhaus)

“Although seemingly these masks tell stories, this again started out as a material experiment. I wanted to find out if by stitching a rope together I could make a large flat carpet. Instead of flat, the samples got curvy. When I was about to give up on the carpet, Vladi came up with the idea of ​​shaping the rope into masks. The possibilities are endless, I’m meeting new faces every day.”

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Optical Illusion Paintings Look Like Cavernous Holes In Gallery Walls

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Artist Gina Ruggeri skillfully plays with perspective and spatial illusion.  Her work often takes the form of painted Mylar cutouts employing trope-l’oeil techniques.  Natural objects such as logs, stones, and smoke seem to float off the wall and into the gallery space.  In other work the white walls give way to rot, decay, and caverns.  Though Ruggeri’s work is eye-catching a definite and clear painting tradition stands out in her work.  She frequently forgoes the traditional canvas for plastic film but her composition and techniques is reminiscent of past styles.  The background landscapes of Renaissance portraits appear to have outgrown their frames (and conventional physics for that matter) and now unfold directly on the gallery walls.

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Daniel Buren’s ‘Perimeter For A Roomwork in Situ’

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French artist Daniel Buren‘s long career has been focused on both questioning and criticizing the relationship of art to the structures that frame it. Buren’s work has delved into installation, critical writing and interventions. From the artist’s statement: “All of Buren’s interventions are created ‘in situ’, appropriating and coloring the spaces in which they are presented. They are critical tools addressing questions of how we look and perceive, and the way space can be used, appropriated, and revealed in its social and physical nature.”

One of his most powerful interventions Perimeter For A Roomwork in Situ. 2011, was installed at Lisson Gallery, the London Gallery who represents Buren and who specializes in conceptual, Minimalist art. Created with sheets of clear acrylic colored with self-adhesive filters, and punctuated by border stripes of black vinyl, Perimeter investigates the nature of the room which houses work, and identifies with the idea of being work. Says the artist in an interview with Wallpaper*’s Emma O’Kelly, “It’s so simple. It follows the perimeter of the room, which is an unusual L-shape, with varying heights. It’s a complicated space, but more exciting to work with than a white cube. Playing with the idea of the perimeter – something I have never done before – I built the piece in-situ, as always…The colours are simple – I could only get four colours of Plexiglas. I arrange them in alphabetical order depending on the language of the country I’m in, so for this piece, they are arranged as they are spelt in English. I always apply this system as soon as I start using more than two colours.” (via wallpaper*)

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