Get Social:

Kunihiko Nohara Creates Sculptures That Hang Between The Earth And Sky

nohara - sculpture

nohara - sculpture

nohara - sculpture

nohara - sculpture

Kunihiko Nohara creates lofty sculptures whose subjects hover between the earth and sky. Using a single piece of wood for each of his pieces, Nohara replaces clothing with clouds making his figures seem ready to take flight in a hot air balloon.

Nohara’s works have earned him the name “The Cloud Man” in Taiwan. But while this name visibly connects him with his works, the clouds also mean something else to Nohara. In interviews he says that clouds are emblematic of his practice in that he often feels “blurry” within his own thoughts. Dealing with this space of fuzziness between thoughts and dream, he further says that his “creations are not necessarily based on fantasy, but neither are they overly grounded in reality – they’re just reflections of my experiences of the world.”

Despite the delicacy and softness of these sculptures, Nohara works entirely in wood and, more notably, only uses one piece for each work. His preference for wood emerged in school but he also believes the use of material aligns his work with Japan’s propensity towards wooden objects, like houses and furniture.

Nohara’s works were recently shown at “Laissez Faire,” a group show presented by Gallery UG at the Luxe Art Museum in Singapore. His sculptures were included with works from 17 other Japanese artists.

Quotes from: expatliving.sg

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Millie Brown Paints With Her Vomit

brownpainting5 brownpainting4

brownpainting brownpainting9

Performance artist Millie Brown uses her body in an uncomfortable way in order to create bright splashes of color on canvas (and sometimes clothes and people). Brown mixes colors into soy milk before regurgitating the milk onto her preferred canvas, akin to the drip-color style of Jackson Pollock. The artist first began experimenting with this method in 2005, and has since performed this act in many places, including for Lady Gaga’s 2006 video, “Excorist Interlude.” Brown, a vegan, only performs this body-exhaustive piece once per month. She fasts for 2 days before each performance so that her stomach is empty and her regurgitations purely the color of the milk she’s ingested; she can drink anywhere from one pint to four liters of liquid depending on the type of performance. The result of her performances are works of bright colors that are not obviously the products of puking.

Responses to her work have varied, ranging from laughing to crying, declarations of love, and even death threats, but Brown maintains that art is supposed to inspire powerful emotions in people. “I have an inherent desire to push my own boundaries within my art… By creating art from the very depths of my own physical being I am able to challenge people’s perception of beauty, expressing raw elements of human nature and in turn challenging myself both physically and mentally.” (via daily mail)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Awesome Video of the Day: UAF Nanook Hockey

OK boys and girls, get ready because this next video you are about to watch will no doubt be the best two minutes of your day. Now you might be thinking, “Why on earth would I watch a video about a college hockey team from Alaska?” Well my friends, on any other day that would be sound reasoning, but I assure you that after you watch this your smile will stretch ear to ear. The brainchild of Mike Martinez and his friends over at HiFi3D, this clip gets me so pumped up every time!

Currently Trending

Blank William Redesigns The Iconic Stormtrooper Mask Into Three Futuristic Animals

Blank William - Design Blank William - Design Blank William - Design Blank William - Design

Like many of us, Blank William grew up a fan of the Star Wars series. Now, he has used his passion and talent as a designer to create a new variety of Stormtroopers—ones with animal features. His feral, futuristic battalion consists of two series, The New Order: White and The New Order: Black. Currently, there are elephant, rhino, and hippo designs, and William has brilliantly meshed the animals’ physical features with the soldiers’ glossy plastoid armor, dark eyes, and ventilation details. Each one is accentuated with gold or silver, giving them a slightly more lethal and formidable appearance. William’s work seems to be playing off the expressionless and ruthless appearance of the original Stormtroopers.

William’s smooth, space-age style is carried into his other works, including a series of animal chess pieces. You can view more of his work on his website. For our readers with Star Wars on the mind—as we know, The Force Awakens is released next month—we’re curious about what you think of William’s reimagining of the iconic Stormtroopers; do you prefer this look for your favourite soldiers? What other animals would be fit to protect the Empire? Comment below! (Via designboom)

Currently Trending

Randy Scott Slavin’s Photographs Turn Landscapes Topsy-Turvy

Randy Scott Slavin HERNSHEAD 2

Randy Scott Slavin Sanctuary Randy Scott Slavin North CoveRandy Scott Slavin AUTUMN IN CENTRAL PARK

In photographer Randy Scott Slavin’s series, Alternative Perspectives, he takes ordinary landscapes and turns them into topsy-turvy, mind-bending sights. At any moment, these panoramic shots make the world appear like it’s going to fold in on itself. Slavin captures all types of terrain, including the red rocks of the Phoenix desert, the beaches in Miami, and the skyscrapers of New York City. These places are transformed in a surreal and psychedelic way.

Salvin takes approximately 100 photos for each image. While he can shoot a scene in less than 10 minutes, it may him hours or days to edit what you see here. The process is a lot of trial and error for the photographer as he figures out what time of day and season is best.

Salvin’s photos not only play with the orientation of the image, but reference time as well. Their circular motion is reminiscent of a wormhole or water spinning down a drain. Both imply a passage, whether it be in years or minutes. (Via Fast Company)

Currently Trending

Fresh Perspectives

fresh-perspectives mark moore gallery

As a sneak peek to the knock-out exhibition “Fresh Perspectives” at Mark Moore Gallery surveying a selection of young, emerging artist opening September 12th, Beautiful/Decay conducted an exhibition preview extravaganza. Read an interview with Catlin Moore about her process of selecting artists, putting the exhibition together and more, as well as five mini interviews with each of the featured artists. In keeping with the theme “Fresh Perspectives,” we gave each artist the same three questions- with surprisingly different answers from each artist! Full article after the jump!

Currently Trending

Finders Keepers, curated by An Hoang for Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA

BLAZE LAMPER, Autumn Sass, 2012, Graphite on paper, 12 x 9 inches

JUSTIN VALDES, Lookout B!, 2010, Pencil and ink on paper, 8 ½ x 10 ¼ inches

Finders Keepers, a group exhibition curated by An Hoang including Joseph Hart, Todd Knopke, Blaze Lamper, Andy Ness, and Justin Valdes featuring drawings, collages, and photographic prints. This show brings together artists who engage in a creative process which allows for discovery through the act of making. What is found by the artists remains to be discovered by the viewer. Whether it is an edge, a gesture or the way the figure is revealed, all the works provide for the experience of uncovering the hidden.

Joseph Hart’s works on paper examine compositional tension through an elegant balance of spontaneous and deliberate marks, heavy and delicate forms, and subtle gestures confined by thick layers of graphite. The detailed, constructed fabric pieces and photographic prints by

Todd Knopke, incorporate the textures, patterns and seams inherent in the material to form dreamlike compositions which transcend the original story of the clothing. Blaze Lamper’s enigmatic graphite drawings feature mysterious figures whose faces remain veiled while in plain sight. The watercolors and pencil drawings by Andy Ness explore personal themes of searching and wandering using recurring imagery of ships, airplanes, teeth, and the reconstructed body to form newly defined narratives. Incorporating airbrush, acrylic and pencil, the still-life drawings by Justin Valdes investigate the relationship between object and frame.

Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA presents Finders KeepersTSA is a new Bushwick gallery located at 44 Stewart Avenue, #49 Brooklyn, NY, 11237.
On view from November 16, 2012 – January 6, 2013. Opening: Friday, November 16, 7-10PM.

Currently Trending

Dan McPharlin’s Sci Fi Illustrations Of Past FUtures

Dan McPharlin - Illustration Dan McPharlin - Illustration Dan McPharlin - Illustration
Dan McPharlin - Illustration

Dan McPharlin
 is an illustrator who is concerned with the “future past or past future,” as he notes on his webpage. His artwork live in a realm of speculative reality, where space is the final frontier — or perhaps the first of a civilization beginning to rebuild itself.
There are dystopian touches in his illustrations: in one, an astronaut gazes on temple ruins; in another, we see the haggard remnants of a bridge that looks like it used to be golden. It’s a little reminiscent of the final scenes of Planet of the Apes, a familiar monument from a world long lost. McPharlin’s work utilizes rich colors that are once neon yet muted. His palette is one that includes the golden rod yellow of futuristic smog as well as the earth tones of somewhere decidedly not-Earth. There is certainly a quality of nostalgia to his work, though for what, we don’t necessarily know.
“These are the worlds of dreams and half-memories,” McPharlin says on his webpage. “The collision zone of past-futures and futures-past, derived from blueprints laid down decades earlier on the pages of battered sci-fi paperbacks, fantasy art books, and mid-century design quarterlies.” (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Currently Trending