Get Social:

Street Artist Curiot Covers Walls Mythical Creatures

 street art7

street art4

El Curiot street art6

Favio Martinez, better known on the street as Curiot, is a street artist based in Mexico City.  His murals and paintings are especially colorful and complex.  Curiot has a well-known and easily distinguishable style.  Strange creatures populate his compositions.  While each creature is definitely alien, Curiot creates them using familiar animal-like components.  Often, these creatures are seen being worshiped by comparably tiny people giving the murals.  In a way, this pulls Curiot’s work out of science fiction and places it more as a meditation and variations on Mexican Culture.  The gallery statement from a recent solo exhibit at FFDG further explains Curiot’s inspiration:

“Curiot’s colorful paintings, featuring mythical half-animal half-human figures and scenes, which allude to Mexican traditions (geometric designs, Day of the Dead styles, myths and legends, tribal elements), are rendered in precise detail with a mixture of highly vibrant yet complementary colors. “Growing up in the States sort of gave me a diluted Mexican culture, I had no clue what I was missing out on until I moved back 10 years ago”, says Curiot. “The bright colors, folklore, ancient cultures and the beautiful handcrafts are some of the things that I embraced and which influence my work deeply”. The 11 new paintings in “Age of Omuktlans” tell the story of man’s distance from his natural path as he focuses his energy on satisfying his material pleasures and the dystopia this creates.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Next Day Flyers Presents: michelle ramin drawing

Michelle Ramin starts her gorgeously rendered drawings by photographing friends in various situations wearing ski masks. These images are used as metaphors for twenty-something hipsters playing dress-up to make the banality of the 40-hour workweek seem more enjoyable. Discussing the need to both hide and reveal ones unique identities, Michelle Ramin’s work is certainly one to watch.

 

This post is brought to you by the event  poster printing company, Next Day Flyers.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton has this amazing polaroid series aptly titled “Geometries.” I’m totally loving his clean, simple, and clever compositions.

 

Currently Trending

Sean Norvet Binges The Imagination With Humorously Gross Mash-Ups Of Food And Flesh

Sean Norvet - Painting Sean Norvet - Painting Sean Norvet - Painting Sean Norvet - Painting

Sean Norvet is an LA-based artist who paints grotesquely amusing mash-ups that represent the mania and excess of contemporary culture. Food and flesh are his two main ingredients; shattered jawbones, melting eyes, raw meat, and fast food collide in unholy, humanoid altars. Norvet punctuates his pieces with eroticized body parts, mixing desire and beauty ideals with mass consumption. Despite the gruesome subject matter, his work is surprisingly humorous—and there’s a lot to digest.

In an Artist Perspective video with the Stay Gallery, Norvet describes today’s technology-saturated world as an all-you-can eat buffet. From dawn until dusk, we are inundated with arbitrary connections and information—whether we consent to them or not. With intense talent and keen social observations, his paintings reveal this cultural chaos in shameless and visceral ways, provoking self-reflection through imagery that is fun, insightful, and revolting.

To view more of Norvet’s work, visit his website and Instagram.

Currently Trending

Kerry Skarbakka’s Photographs Of Himself Falling From Trees, Bridges, And Off Cliffs

Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_01.jpg Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_02.jpg Kerry_Skarbakka_beautiful_decay_03.jpg

Artist Kerry Skarbakka creates Struggle to Right Oneself, a series of photographs that capture the artist himself in moments of suspended threat: falling from trees, tumbling head over heels in painfully precarious falls, or teetering on the edge of a fateful leap from a railway bridge. The images may be comical yet unavoidably painful to watch. According to Skarbakka, the idea of the fall comes from Martin Heidegger’s description of human existence as a process of perpetual falling. What are we without our falls and broken bones? The photographer captures a loss of control, that inevitable moment, prior to a fall, when one feels uncertain and scared, unable to know what happens next.

I continually return to questions regarding the nature of control and its effects on this perceived responsibility, since beyond the basic laws that govern and maintain our equilibrium, we live in a world that constantly tests our stability in various other forms. It is my understanding and my perspective, which relies on the shifting human conditions of the world that we inhabit. It’s exploration resides in the sublime metaphorical space from where balance has been disrupted to the definitive point of no return. It asks the question of what it means to resist the struggle, to simply let go. Or what are the consequences of holding on?

Skarbakka utilizes special climbing gear and other rigging to achieve each shot, the final images, however, are truly convincing. (via Colossal)

Currently Trending

Catherine Nelson Creates Landscapes From Hundreds Of Photographs

Approaching Storm

Approaching Storm

Approaching Storm - detail

Approaching Storm – detail

Lost

Lost

Lost - detail

Lost – detail

Catherine Nelson’s newest series Expedition is comprised of hundreds of photographs, collaged and digitally “painted” together to make five imaginary landscapes. Using her experiences in the creation of visual effects for feature films like Moulin Rouge and Harry Potter, Nelson assembles the countless photographs into one seamless, vibrant, and surreal image. This style of working isn’t new for the artist, and we’ve previously featured her incredible floating worlds before.

In a short statement, she describes what her motivation was for her style, writing:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level.

When you see the images up close, you appreciate at her photo manipulating skills even more. They are flawlessly put together and not to mention rich with great details. She features luscious greens of all kinds, plants, animals, and even humans, making references to mythologies like the story of Narcissus. All elements were inspired by Nelson’s memories of growing up along the east coast of Australia. (Via Colossal)

Currently Trending

Sponsored Post: Michelin Premier A/S Tires

Whether you’re driving to your studio to make work or going out to openings you want to make sure that you’re car is in great shape and ready to take anything that the elements may throw your way. One of the best ways you can do so is by using Michelin’s Premier A/S tires. These new tires with EverGrip help your car stay on track during rain or shine. Using a proprietary mix of silica and sunflower oil the tires grip the road in wet condition like no other tires before. If that’s not enough the Premier A/S tires also has specially designed expanding rain grooves that maintains the amount of water that the tires can channel away even as the grooves lose depth over time.  So hit the road with Michelin’s Premier A/S tires and feel safe knowing that all you’ll be riding safe during all of our creative adventures in the city and beyond!

This is a sponsored post by Michelin.

Currently Trending

Teo “Moneyless” Pirisi’s Mysterious Geometric Installations

Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi Teo "Moneyless" Pirisi

Born from a complicated mixture of graffiti, typographic abstraction and installation art, the work of Italian street artist Teo “Moneyless” Pirisi differs slightly from what you would expect to find in an outdoor space. His mathematical, geometric sketches are quiet, contemplative—an appropriate precursor to his finished installations. What started as lettering on walls steadily shifted toward pure abstraction, where Pirisi says “my efforts then dropped the symbolic meaning of the letter.”

Pirisi ditched the paint, the letters and the walls for a series of carefully choreographed suspended rope installations. He has traveled the world creating multiple iterations of these works, which are often found suspended in wild or forgotten spaces. Pirisi’s attention to perspective and material are seamless, and his placement is usually quite surprising—providing moments of wonder for curious passerby.

From the artist: “My shapes are reduced to the minimum, at the same time they carry some kind of an intense tension, an invisible movement; most of my patterns hide multiple visions and different perspectives. I think my art now speaks through geometry.”

Currently Trending