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Graphic Designers Embark on Strange 40 Day Dating Project

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40 Days of Dating – All Videos from 40 Days of Dating on Vimeo.

It’s difficult to tell if it is performance art, a design project, or just a weird way to date.  However you classify it, graphic designers Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman have flung themselves into the project straightforwardly titled 40 Days of Dating.  Exasperated with the New York City dating scene, the designers turned to each other.  Each deals with the opposite problem – Jessica jumps in too quickly, Timothy’s reluctant to take the plunge.  The two good friends decided to date each other for forty days – the amount of time often thought required to quit a bad habit.  However, the dating project entails a bit more.  First, there are six rules:

  1. We will see each other every day for forty days.
  2. We will go on at least three dates a week.
  3. We will see a couples therapist once a week.
  4. We will go on one weekend trip together.
  5. We will fill out the daily questionnaire and document everything.
  6. We will not see, date, hookup, or have sex with anyone else.

The daily dating adventures of the couple were then uploaded to their in fashionable design style.  Would love and dating be redeemed or their relationship irreparably ruined?  40 Days of Dating was set to find out.

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Jim Gaylord opens tonight @ Gregory Lind

Jim Gaylord will be exhibiting new work at Gregory Lind gallery, opening Sat. Feb 5th and running til March 14th. Building on his past work as a filmmaker, Gaylord’s work cultivates and abstracts imagery from special effects and action sequences in the movies. With titles like “Study (Braveheart + Jackass: the Movie + Cloverfield + Last of the Mohicans + Home Alone 2), 2009,” Gaylord reveals the humor behind popular culture through the lens of movies.

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Tom Lynall’s Tiny Intricate Pencil Carvings Of Emojis And Pop Culture Symbols Are So Small You Can Barely See Them

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The art of pencil carving is becoming more and more widespread, intricate, and skilled. Over the past few years we have come to see many incredible things being carved from the humble pencil. Whether it is colored, or plain graphite, a leaden tip can be transformed into many icons, symbols or dioramas. Artist Tom Lynall‘s effort sees him shaping pencil tips into emojis, tiny characters and landscapes. From an artist’s paint palette, to idyllic pastoral views, to Rapunzel in her tower, to the hearts, lightning bolts and happy faces from our smart phones, Lynall is capable of achieving great detail on a minute scale.

A bespoke jeweler by trade, Lynall is no stranger to working at this level, or at the pace required to finish a delicate piece. But only having started his pencil carving hobby last November, he is quickly adapting to his new material. Being malleable and dense, graphite is an ideal material to carve intricate and complicate details into. He says about his new time consuming hobby:

I love art but I have never been able to draw so this is a good way for me to create things with the limitations of my skill. The main tool I use is the scalpel blade shown in the pictures as well as a few pins which I have altered the end of to give me different blades.
This is great fun to do so if you would like to give it a go the best advice I can give is to not get annoyed when they break, they are extremely fragile but once your done they are fantastically satisfying. (Source)

For more amazing miniature sculptures made from the lead and wood of pencils or even crayons, see the work of artists Salavat Fidai, Dalton Ghetti, and Diem Chau. (Via Design Boom)

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Patty Chang

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In Patty Chang’s video art piece, “In Love”, she makes out with her mom and dad… I am horrified. I literally squirmed through the entirety of the video. I don’t really know what to say about this… all I know is that I feel like crying and I don’t know why.

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Stacey Rozich’s Macabre Folk Tale Paintings

We have featured Stacey Rozich‘s delightfully macabre paintings (here) in the past. She continues to explore various themes with her pattern clad creatures and masked figures. Her work is mostly fantastical although she occasionally delves into the mundane. Her characters can be seen wrecking cars, shooting rifles, playing records, and consuming alcohol. This is a welcome addition to her scenes of magic and mythical beasts in the midst of various adventures.       

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Kristin Smith’s Photographs of Blurred-Out Bodies in Motion

 

Diggin’ on this Bodies of Thought photo series from San Francisco based artist and photographer Kristin Smith. The pictures deal with the concept of “an intelligent body, where the body’s thoughts are realized through movement.” Smith’s process removes any normal definition of personality from the figures and reveals, instead, a more ethereal consciousness that perhaps resides within us all. The works, blurred bodies full of motion set against black backgrounds, come off as very pure. Smiths models for the series (some of which, over the years, have been professional dancers) find a way, through Smith’s eye, to release a particularly distilled form of expression. “Intellect” is definitely present here, but not that of any worldly concerns. This series goes above (or below) the surface. (via)

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Paintings Made Of Real Human Ashes Immortalize The Dead

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When the artist Adam Brown paints a portrait, he sprinkles cremated human remains into his palette, hoping to memorialize the dead in a way that celebrates their individualism and vitality; each image, most commissioned by the loved one of a recent decedent, serves as an alternative to the traditional urn.

After Brown’s clients submit a sampling of sandy ashes, the artist dons a pair of gloves and mixes them with paint to create personalized renditions and imaginings of the dead that span from straight black and white portraiture to dreamy colored abstractions. He carefully preserves any and all unused ashes, ultimately returning them to his client.

The project, titled Ashes to Art, poignantly aims to reconstruct the deconstructed body, fixing delicate cremains with glue and paint; in this way, his paintings work to incapsulate the entirety of the human body and lifetime into one sly smile, one glint of the eye, or one splash of color.

Brown’s ambitious body of work subverts morbid thoughts on human remains, adopting the medium to create shockingly cheerful faces, heavily textured hands, and vividly yellow flames. The idea of permanence figures prominently into the work; not unlike the popular ritualistic scattering of ashes over the sea, his landscape paintings elegantly incorporate the corporeal into the seemingly eternal earth, everlasting sky, or immovable mountains.

With each work, the artist ensures the respectful remembrance of human life with a simple inscription; lest a piece get lost or auctioned and taken for an average painting, he writes a disclaimer on its backing: this work of art contains human remains. (via Daily Mail and Oddity Central)

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Argentine Photographer Mariela Sancari Creates Fictionalized Portraits Of Her Deceased Father

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Argentine based photographer Mariela Sancari‘s series Moisés, acts as an ode to the traditional type of portrait taken of men in their 70’s, the age her deceased father would have been if he were still alive today. After her father’s death, the artist and her twin sister we denied the chance to see his body. She was never sure if it “was because he committed suicide or because of Jewish religious beliefs or both.” In the artist’s statement, she refers to a concept in thanatology (the study of death and practices associated with it) which asserts that when one does not encounter the dead body of a loved one, the lack of visual association prevents the ability to accept their death. Hence, not having the definitive proof of said death aids denial, one of the most complicated stages of grief. Referring to the Baudrillard quote “photography is our exorcism,” Mariela Sancari uses her photographs to play out the fantasy of her attached denial — she uses her portraits to create a fictionalized version of her father. She states;

“I once read that fiction´s primary task is to favor evolution, forcing us to acknowledge and become the otherness around us. I think fiction can help us depict the endless reservoir of the unconscious, allowing us to represent our desires and fantasies.”

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