Get Social:

Artwork Of The Day: Jocelyn Hobbie’s Acadia

I love the vintage look of Jocelyn Hobbie’s paintings. It’s almost like pinup girls from tattoo flash came to life! I could see these turning into a beautiful collection of vintage themed postcards or a set of prints.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ondrej Konupcik’s Unique Tattoo Style Imitates Watercolor Brush Strokes That Come Alive On Your Skin

Ondrej Konupcik - Design 1 Ondrej Konupcik - Design 9_1

Ondrash 11

Ondrej Konupcik - Design 10

Ondrej Konupcik is a Czech artist offering organic and original watercolor brush strokes and ink splatters on a tattoo. He depicts explosive impressive animals like hawks, foxes and wolves but also other simpler objects. Customers don’t choose from catalogs when they come to Ondrej Konupcik, each drawing has to be almost custom-made. 

The artist, who also goes by Ondrash, has to feel a connection to the subject before starting the process of tattooing. That’s the reason why he only takes care of one person per day. He wants to know on a deep level the story behind the tattoo. He traces directly on his customers to embrace their bodies and curves. He illustrates their wishes and desires from what they reveal.

A lot of the time mistaken for watercolor paintings applied directly to the skin, Ondrash’s tattoos has gained the appellation of compositional, figural art and today art brut tattoo. He gets his inspiration by browsing the web, getting ideas from other artists and painting daily for himself using watercolor and oil.
Ondrash also tried to graffiti. Enjoying the way the colors evolve in front of his eyes at a faster pace than when he tattoos, this could maybe his lead to a new project. (via deMilked).

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

“Serious Design”: Matija Erceg’s Humorously Disgusting Hybrids Of Raw Food And Everyday Objects

Matija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - Design

Stumble onto Matija Erceg’s Instagram account — inconspicuously named @seriousdesign — and find yourself immersed in a gallery of delight and disgust. Erceg, a Vancouver-based web and graphic designer, combines images of food — usually raw meat — with everyday objects. Among his hilariously gross “inventions” are shrimp earbuds, pizza irons, ground pork trolls, and sausage vibrators (the latter design taking the “food porn” trend to an entirely new level). The idea emerged when Erceg came across a photoshopped image of sandals with cooked beef as soles; while contemplating the absurd experience of putting them on, Erceg decided he wanted to try and evoke similar reactions among people, discovering as he went that food “lends itself nicely to being a part of an inanimate object” — hence how easily a chicken breast can be made to look like an oven mitt.

In addition to making people laugh and cringe, Erceg’s designs are experiments in context. If food is presented neatly — and properly cooked — on a plate, it is seen as acceptable and appealing; but, as Erceg observes, when the same food makes contact with “your skin (hands, feet, ears, face, etc.), [it] becomes gross or weird” — shrimp, while often considered a delicacy, does not belong inside the ear canal. There are several possible reasons for this discomfort, whether it’s in regards to phobias surrounding the (potential) toxicity of raw meat, or just the idea of dead, cold flesh lying around the house as a useable object. Erceg, however, pushes it further, commenting on how his designs confront us with the unglamorous realities of modern food production: “We admire food, but typically only when we don’t need to get too close to it — [the] raw texture, pre-cooked form, farming, and slaughtering.” His designs remind us of how alienated we are from the foods we eat; food — like sunglasses, housewares, and sex toys — has become grossly commodified.

When I asked Erceg where he aims to take his project next, he said he would like to collaborate with a fake food artist and create real-life versions of his designs. Follow Erceg on Instagram and see what edible objects he dreams up next. But be warned — you may not look at packaged chicken breasts or slabs of beef the same way again.

Currently Trending

Claire Morgan’s Crazy Installations Use Weird Materials Like Taxidermy and Dandelion Seeds

 

…My attention has been drawn to the cheap distractions we choose to place in our immediate vicinity, with which to screen us from the overwhelming facts: that we are nothing; that our only certainty as individuals is a life, of unspecified duration, and then a death.

Seeing some crazy output from London-based artist Claire Morgon. Using a lot of unusual materials, she’s put together some really huge (both in scale and technique) installations. Dandelion seeds? Taxidermy? Yes please.

But to get the full Morgan effect, you have to click to her website. She’s got some awesome works on paper too. And if you’re anywhere near Cologne, Germany, head over to Galerie Karsten Greve, where the artist is currently showing a new batch of work. (via)

Currently Trending

Rachel Hecker’s Hand-painted Ephemera

Rachel Hecker - installation

Rachel Hecker - installation

Screen Shot 2013-09-26 at 9.34.16 AM

Based in the history of Pop Art, but with intentions wholly different, Rachel Hecker’s paintings and sculptures are blown up representations of those everyday items we think of (if we think of them at all) as disposable.  Handwritten lists, post-it notes, calendar scribbles, fortune cookie papers, receipts and pricing stickers are just a few of the items Hecker transforms into acrylic on canvas paintings.

Far more personal than the subject matter of the Pop artists, Hecker carefully recreates by hand each piece of ephemera.  Of these works she says:

“They contain vestiges of our intentions and our deeds, and are inadvertent diaries and forensic evidence of how we exist in the world.  These scraps of paper detritus anticipate or record a range of experience from the mundane to the exalted, from dull repetition to fancy, and from stasis to expectancy.”

Currently Trending

Justine Ashbee

"Force", 33" x 35"

"Force", 33" x 35"

Justine Ashbee’s work is an amorphous trip into the non-linear  realm of the imagination. Her work is executed purely by hand, using paint pens. She begins with a  curve, from which lines and forms begin to spontaneously morph, and grow. Each piece gives voice to an experience, spoken in a visual language of  elegance and beauty.

Currently Trending

Michael Willis

Exciting illustrations by graphic designer and illustrator Michael Willis. I love color palate and use of texture!

Currently Trending

Please Say Something

A short animation from the mind of David OReilly. We observe the destructive, hopeful, yet abusive marriage between a cat and a mouse. Incredibly witty, minimalistic, and very conceptual. This is a personal favorite of mine.

Currently Trending