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Susan Jamison


Susan Jamisons cryptic depictions of femininity incorporate references from medical and botany journals, domestic objects and, of course, Snow White.

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Terry Rodgers

Terry Rodgers reflects the time we are living in through his body of work.  He touches on topics pertaining to contemporary body politics, isolation, and hope.

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Studio Visit: Meryl Pataky’s Neon & Nature

Meryl Pataky

Meryl Pataky

Meryl Pataky Meryl Pataky

San Francisco-based metalsmith and neon artist Meryl Pataky has shared with us some behind-the-scenes moments from her studio, as she gears up for her next solo project, Cellar Door.

Working exclusively with elements from the periodic table, Pataky uses a collision of phrase and loose linework to give life to her concepts—silver, copper, iron, carbon, neon and all of the noble gases are integral to her investigations. For her latest collection of work, Pataky is creating a series of signage-based installations that attempt to coexist with natural elements. Matching up blown glass with honey, and pairing neon lettering with leafy underbrush, she explores the effect that context and concept have on her luminous, typically commercial medium. The vivid colors and natural, flowing use of line in her pieces echo a mastery of medium, and her nods to just the right amount of science geekery are playful and perfectly timed.

Cellar Door is on view at White Walls Gallery through August 10, 2013.

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Kyle Jorgensen’s Ethereal Paintings (Far Out, Man)

 

Portlander Kyle Jorgensen combines ethereal, cosmic subject matter with explicitly tactile media selections, and it really works. In the age of Photoshop, a lot of this type of imagery is often generated through digital means. It’s really nice to see a guy just go all out homegrown. Great palette here as well. Click past the jump, and then check out his blog for more.

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Cyril Costilhes’ Haunting Photos Of A Madagascan Port, The Site Of His Father’s Death

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Cyril Costilhes has a very unique relationship to Diego Suarez, the location where he shot his deeply dark photoseries, ‘Grand Circle Diego’. A little over 10 years ago, his father moved there to run a casino, but was returned to France after a tragic motorcycle accident that caused him front lobe dementia, placing him in a coma. Costilhes saw his father’s move as an attempt to start fresh, lured by the beauty of the young women and environment. To Costilhes, his father’s aspirations were an illusion, and one shared by many white men in a similar position, a type of modern colonialism. The underbelly of Diego Suarez is one of desperation, where people of privilege go to seek asylum in a false paradise, and the inhabitants seek salvation through the refugees of reality.

When I google Diego Suarez, the images that surface are of an idyllic seaside town, a stark contrast to the images produced by Costilhes. His experience of the town is mired by that of his father, and he travelled there to resolve the ghosts that still hang over him as his father remains in a coma to this day. The photoseries is compiled as a book, and Costilhes writes about his time spent in Diego Suarez. He imagines the moments leading up to his father’s crash:

What was his last clear, clean thought right before the crash?! Was he daydreaming about the girl he was going to fuck next, daydreaming about his new house on the beach of Ramena, or about the money he was going to make by reselling that ambitious hotel in construction, about what he was going to do next, living in a paradise until the grandiose ending.

Purchase copies of Cyril Costilhes’ book Grand Circle Diego here.

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DALeast’s Unraveling Street Art

Chinese street artist DALeast studied sculpture at the Institute of Fine Arts and began doing art on public space at 2004 under the alias DAL. He is inspired by the way the material world revolves, how the spiritual world unfolds, life’s emotions and the infinite space around us. His massive murals resemble thousands of strands of yarn or thread that are continuously unraveling and coming together to create incredible sweeping imagery. (via)

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Watch Unbelievable Video Of Moroccan Artists Hand Craft Perfect Mosaics By Hand

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Moroccan interior design company Habibi Interiors invites us to watch master craftsman create beautifully hand carved terra cotta tiles. These tiles are used in the creation of zellige (also known as zillij, or zellij), a form of Islamic tile work that uses geometric patterns to form mosaics that decorate various surfaces. The most common shapes used are the star, square and cross. The mosaics only portray geometric patterns due to the fact that historically, islamic artists were working in accordance of aniconism, the forbiddance of portraying sentient beings. This art is a primary characteristic of Moroccan architecture. Traditionally, a house decorated using zellige was a sign of a high class family. It is not only the creation of the mosaics that is considered an art form, the sculpting of the tiles is also a highly skilled process. The art is handed down through the generations by maâlems (master craftsmen) and is a long process that begins during childhood. As shown in the video, the tiles are crafted by making clay sheets that are ten by ten centimeters long. The tiles are then painted. Afterwards, the desired shapes are traced onto the tiles and then carved down slowly by hand. Each small piece is crafted perfectly to fit within its neighboring piece. The tiles are then patterned into place and sealed together. 

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Frederik Heyman

Gorgeous and a tad grotesque photography by Frederik Heyman.

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