Get Social:

Smooth Indie R&B from Tom Krell’s How To Dress Well

How To Dress Well performing at the Echoplex, December 4, 2012

It’s late Tuesday night… VERY late, well it’s actually almost 1am on Wednesday morning when Whitney Houston sings out from the speakers and Tom Krell aka How To Dress Well makes his way onto the Echoplex stage. Ten candles burn at his feet and beautiful video projections illuminate him and his backing band when his voice, a beautiful haunting falsetto hits my ears and my head starts thumping to the beat.

Playing songs from Total Loss, his newish record out now on Acéphale and a few from his debut album Love Remains, the heartbreaking, but beautiful set highlighted not only his voice, but his talent as a songwriter. When he sang the song Set It Right, it rang out like an R&B version of the late Jim Carroll‘s, People Who Died with the names of friends and family who have passed or not in his life anymore.

Tickets are still available for the few shows left on his North American tour including the final show at Chicago’s Co-Prosperity Sphere on December 14th via Ticketweb.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

CANSON WET PAINT GRANT RECIPIENT: Micah Ganske

Micah Ganske’s paintings will give you a headache….in a good way. The unbelievable amount of detail that goes into his often large-scale paintings is absolutely a testament to his passion and dedication to the subjects he addresses. Detail doesn’t even seem to describe the amount of disciplined attention that goes into each piece. In his paintings, which can measure up to 120” x 150”, Ganske will draw in every window on every building and every car. In another painting, a giant tripod supporting a tiny digital camera in the foreground has such smooth gradation on the metal, you know exactly how it would feel if you could reach into the image. The result is something that demands attention.

Once you get over the amazement of how much visual information he provides the viewer, (a process that takes a fair amount of time) the signification of the layered symbolism begins to appear. Ganske explains that he wants “the world that [his] work exists in to be a streamlined synthesis of all visual stimulation [he] has ever taken in; nothing sacred, all sources brought down to the same level.” Once all on the same playing field, Ganske imprints his opinions about the way people interact with the natural world and the technological world. Most recently, Ganske is currently pursing a body of work titled, Tomorrow Land, which combines both a disappointment in the broken promises of mid-century technology, and a hopefulness borne from knowing that certain individuals are still devoted to exploring new frontiers and changing the way we think about the world.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Physical Trauma Survivors Reenact Scenes From Missoni Fashion Catalog

Denise-Prince-Photography-1 Denise-Prince-Photography-2 Denise-Prince-Photography-3 Denise-Prince-Photography-4

Photographer Denise Prince challenges our perception of beauty and aesthetics by interchanging professional models with physical trauma survivors in her latest photography and video project Tractatus 7. Using a catalog by a high-end Italian fashion house Missoni, Prince replicates the superimposed glamour with a pinch of cruel, muted reality.

The provocative project, originally titled Replication and Breakdown of the Missoni Estate Line Catalog, is a juxtaposition between our approach towards reality and the events that take place beyond that fantasy. Prince raises a question of what happens to our designed reality when a traumatic event occurs? To her belief, people who have undergone severe traumas have an improved capacity to face the human condition.

“My sense is that when we see people with evidence of physical trauma we initially see them as people who were “not safe” and are reminded, ultimately, of our own mortality. I deeply believe that engaging with what we think we fear and yet gives all meaning to life (death – to the extent that this work is a reminder) brings with it a sense of greater peace.”

Prince uses her uncomfortable and grotesque way of storytelling to share the subject’s experiences (accidents, birth defects or assault) in an attempt to surpass standards of representation with the public, which is often deaf and blind to such events. Photographer is committed not to position her models as victims: “I work with people who have sufficiently recovered, established a new relationship to fantasy <…> At this stage <…> they are open to play, <…> to serve as an object of desire, to social risk taking.”

Tractatus 7 opens to public September 7 and will be running until September 27 at University Park in Austin, Texas. (via feature shoot)

Currently Trending

Crowds of Protest

570a_1227228818-copy
570b_1227228818
Some nice work by Scott David Johnson depicting aerial views of crowds and protests. More images can be seen on the Tinlark Gallery website or better yet in person at the gallery if you happen to live in the LA area.

Currently Trending

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy’s Haunting Photoseries Erases Buildings, Leaving Only Their Facades

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

tumblr_n28eh8hi8E1qbkx0lo2_500

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy is a French photographer whose Facades series is a personal exercise in land and city-scape photography, with one major difference. In each photo, the Lyon-based Gaudrillot-Roy digitally edits each image so that building itself is erased, leaving only the structure’s front, or facade, present. Now on his third iteration of the series, each village or city building carries ominous, almost surreal connotations of civilizations being abandoned, wrecked by recession, or left to slowly disintegrate. However, the images retain a still, quiet beauty, and are haunting in their simplicity.

Says the photographer, “The façade is the first thing we see, it’s the surface of a building. It can be impressive, superficial or safe. Just like during a wandering through a foreign city, I walk through the streets with these questions: what will happen if we stick to that first vision? If the daily life of “The Other” was only a scenery? This series thus offers a vision of an unknown world that would only be a picture, without intimate space, with looks as the only refuge.” (via skumar’s)

Currently Trending

Phil Bebbington Is Abandoned

Photographer Phil Bebbington takes pictures of mostly abandoned spaces throughout the world that once were popular like resorts and churches. His portraits can be just as haunting, people that could easily abandon where they are as well. Check out Phil’s flickr and blog too.

Currently Trending

A Neon Message From Your Environment

Jung Lee - Public Art Jung Lee - Public ArtJung Lee - Public Art

We interrupt this broadcast to bring you an important message from your environment courtesy of Jung Lee, master translator, whose photographs place neon signage in unconventional places, working as emotive subtitles.

Each piece reminds us– it’s not necessarily the people we are searching for in relation to love, but the lingering romanticism of time and space: the feeling of earth cradling our fall.

Currently Trending

Julie Green Paints The Final Meals Of Death Row Inmates Onto Porcelain Plates

Maryland 17 July 2004:  Had the regular prison fare of a chicken patty , potatoes and gravy, green beans, marble cake, milk and fruit punch.

Maryland 17 July 2004: Had the regular prison fare of a chicken patty , potatoes and gravy, green beans, marble cake, milk and fruit punch.

Missouri 30 August 2000: 12 ounce T-bone steak (medium rare), Caesar salad, double order onion rings, 20 ounces of Diet Coke.

Missouri 30 August 2000:
12 ounce T-bone steak (medium rare), Caesar salad, double order onion rings, 20 ounces of Diet Coke.

Washington 27 May 1994: Salmon, scalloped potatoes, peas, tossed salad, cake.

Washington 27 May 1994: Salmon, scalloped potatoes, peas, tossed salad, cake.

Oklahoma 22 January 2009: Barbecue ribs, chopped beef, hot links, baked beans, plain potato chips, coconut doughnuts and chocolate milk.

Oklahoma 22 January 2009: Barbecue ribs, chopped beef, hot links, baked beans, plain potato chips, coconut doughnuts and chocolate milk.

Since the year 2000, artist Julie Green has immortalized the final meal requests of US death row inmates. It’s an on-going project aptly-titled The Last Supper, and she paints cobalt-blue pictures of the meals onto second-hand porcelain plates.

Green’s initial inspiration for the series came when she was working at the University of Oklahoma and noticed this menu printed in her morning paper: “three fried chicken thighs, 10 or 15 shrimp, tater tots with ketchup, two slices of pecan pie, strawberry ice cream, honey and biscuits, and a Coke.” It was included in the death notice of an inmate’s execution. This tradition of a final meal startled her, and she clipped the menu, as well as others that she saw.

Not long after seeing that clipping did she start The Last Supper. Along with painting the plates, she also details what the inmate ordered. Green writes:

In states with options, most selections are modest. This is not surprising, as many are limited to what is in the prison kitchen. Others provide meals from local venues. California allows restaurant take-out, up to fifty-dollars. Pizza Hut, Wendy’s, and Long John Silver’s are frequently selected in Oklahoma, where their fifteen-dollar allowance is down from twenty in the late 1990’s. Requests provide clues on region, race, and economic background. A family history becomes apparent when Indiana Department of Corrections adds “he told us he never had a birthday cake so we ordered a birthday cake for him.”

 

Over time, she’s completed 600 plates – 50 a year. Green spends six months of every year working on this project, and she plans to continue it until capital punishment is abolished.

The Last Supper will be on display this spring at the Dayton Art Institute in Dayton, Ohio in an exhibition titled The Last Supper: 600 Plates Illustrating Final Meals of U.S. Death Row Inmates. (Via PBS Art Beat)

Currently Trending