Portraits And Abstract Paintings Inspired By Glitter Bombed Lindsay Lohan

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Jason Willome uses a diverse array of materials: acrylic, glitter, rayon flocking, archival pigment transfers, and cement, to expose ephemeral palpitations we, as humans, emote from personal experience, art history, or popular culture.

His portraits, for instance, take inspiration from a tabloid shot of glitter bombed Lindsay Lohan. Willome explains, “It was really beautiful because there was this atmosphere of glitter all around the space of the image, and there were these great cast shadows being projected through the glitter onto Lindsay Lohan, by paparazzi flash bulbs. I thought this would be a wonderful way to create a connection between an image and the surface, to kind of soften the painted illusion, but play into it at the same time.”

Likewise, on a similar note, his “Technology Series” (second, above) further investigates “the atmosphere of the glitter bomb and interpreting atmosphere as paint material.”

For both, what emerges is an airy quote lifted from mainstream media, translated with imagery that avoids the weight of celebrity by embracing another more elusive aura: how everyday abstraction beautifully haunts these spaces we build or share together.

Rainbows and Carcasses in Chase Westfall’s Abstract Paintings

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The paintings of Chase Westfall are pleasantly elusive.  His work often toes the line between abstraction and figuration.  He seems to often swing from sunny imagary such as flowers or rainbows to that of mutilated animal carcasses.  However, he never gives it entirely away.  The imagary often is obscured by a diamond grid work or its own abstraction.  The viewers eyes constantly shifts between deciphering the images and inspecting the pattern, neither resolving the other.  His oil paintings are executed on linen contrasting the soft surface with his hard edged geometric shapes.

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The Design Based Abstract Street Art of Sergio Gómez

The street art of Sergio Gómez brings the latest in abstract art and graphic design to urban walls.  Unlike much complex and text heavy street art, Gomez’ work primarily relies on primary colors and simple geometric forms.  He seems to borrow as much from art styles such as Suprematism as he does from principles of graphic design.  Gomez’ street art even seems to express a similar tendency to some the most exciting new abstract painters often referred to as the New Casualists.  The murals seem to acknowledge street art conventions but mischievously not deliver.  His work is subversive in reclaiming public space while undermining expectations.

Akihiko Miyoshi’s Elegantly Simple Abstract Photographs

Artist Akihiko Miyoshi creates amazing abstract work using simple photographic technique.  He uses little more than a camera, colored tape, and a mirror to explore ideas of composition and color.  While photography is arguably thought of as the epitome of representational art, Akihiko’s images are decidedly abstract.  While minimally manipulating his images, they stand distinct from painting counterparts.  In a way Akihiko abstracts not only form, but light.

The Abstract Street Art of MOMO

MOMO is a street artist working internationally.  His pieces can range in size from relatively small to the size of city blocks.  It is his style, though that is peculiar.  His murals forgo text or figuration in favor of an abstract form.  His work often has a deceptively simple composition.  MOMO’s technique resembles simple print aesthetics while even referencing mid-century abstract painters.

Anti-Photographs by Sonia D’Argenzio

French/Italian artist Sonia D’Argenzio sent over some of her new abstract ‘anti-photographs’ this past week, and i’m more than impressed. Her ability to pull an excellent image from film before/after/without processing is unrivaled (at least to my Tumblr eyes), and i’m even more convinced by her devotion to the analog process. She might just be the real deal.

Clustered Paintings with Just Enough Abstract Mystery From James Kirkpatrick

The texture on these mixed media paintings from Canadian artist James Kirkpatrick  is insane. Packed with color, the artist’s nebulous, jumbled works, which contain just the slightest hint of concrete elements here and there (is that a car? –wait– is that a face, now?), exist very close to complete abstraction. This deft “one foot in, one foot out” dance is indicative of great skill on Kirkpatrick’s part. The subtlety of these paintings is really where their greatest value is. In a culture where everything is increasingly spelled out for us ahead of time, it’s nice to preserve a little bit of mystery.

Kirkpatrick is taking part in Zaga Zow, a group show at Cooper Cole in Toronto, until August 18.

Jen Garrido’s Bold Strokes

Painter Jen Garrido’s work is bold, simple, yet elegant. Her work reminds me of papercuts, but I love seeing the slight paint texture in each piece. Her work is a combo of small textural paintings, and small minimal works that seem to fit together just right. Her two styles compliment one another instead of challenging. I’d be curious to see what she can do with much larger works in the future.