Banksy Pieces Transformed Into GIF Animations

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Serbian Tumblr gif artist ABVH has created animations based on some of Banksy’s iconic street art. These animations give life to Banksy’s poignant (but static) images by enlivening the experience of humor and absurdity that accompanies much of Banksy’s work. These gifs first began to appear in September of last year. Since then, ABVH has created a few more images, the latest of which was posted just last week. Be sure to follow the artist’s Tumblr page to check out more of these gifs as they appear.  Made By ABVH also features other animated gif work, included some rendered in 3D, requiring the use of proper glasses. (via we the urban)

Famed Art Critic Jerry Saltz’s Doesn’t Think Much Of Banksy

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Street artist Banksy has famously made his way to NYC. For the past few weeks he’s sprinkled his work throughout the city. Everyday, he posts photos on his Instagram feed of new pieces and where people can find them. The response, so far, has been staggering. His reputation and widespread media coverage has people turning out in droves to view his art.

Not everyone is impressed, though. Jerry Saltz, famed art critic for New York Magazine, calls him “Mr. Meh,” and is generally underwhelmed by the message of Banksy’s work. Saltz writes in a recent post on Vulture,  “His black silhouette figures, surreptitiously painted on walls around the city, strike me as formulaic tweaked political cartooning, and anarchy-lite.” He goes on to say that Banksy is a repetitive thinker; If you’ve seen one, then you’ve seen them all. Additionally, Saltz notes that artists like Kara Walker have been creating silhouette works for nearly 20 years and Banksy’s work, “…doesn’t pack anywhere near the formal or psychological incendiary wallop” as Walker’s does.

In the above video, Saltz takes to the streets. He found a crowd of people surrounding Banksy’s work on the side of a DSW. Interestingly, the piece was vandalized. Another street artist screwed a large sheet of Plexiglas over Banksy’s work and painted “Let the Streets Decide” over top. Once it’s removed, Saltz talks with the crowd about what they think of Banksy and the particular piece:

From the conversation, Saltz has a realization. He writes, “I suddenly got what the reaction to Banksy is about: It’s being part of the reaction to a Banksy. It’s a multiplying communal occasion, friendly, a way to talk to strangers and share a piece of New York. It’s anti-Establishment, anti-capitalist, and anti-art-world enough to add a frisson of libertarian rebellion and take-it-to-the-street cred.

Where do you stand with Saltz and the people on the street? Do you think Banksy is interesting?

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Hanksy: The Puntastic Street Fartist

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Just when you thought Banksy was the real trickster of the art world, along comes . . . Hanksy, the puntastic street fartist. His use of satire not only challenges the smug, but playfully subverts the current street art standard with a necessary dose of light antagonism.

Check out the video after the jump to see a short documentary about Hanksy’s mysterious persona: his meager “greeting card” beginnings and current mission statement, which centers on a dream of meeting Tom Hanks.

Nick Stern’s Living Recreations Of Banksy’s Street Art

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The work of legendary street artist Banksy is now iconic, even throughout the larger art world.  Photographer Nick Stern uses these easily recognizable images as a starting point.  Stern literally brings Banksy’s pieces to life.  He restages the wall art using real people and objects in place of the spray paint and posters.  Using living subjects adds emphasis to the often powerful and startling art of Banksy.

BEAUTIFUL/DECAY X ROYAL TALENS Amsterdam Trip PT. 1

I’m happy to present second installment of photographs from our amazing European trip with our friends over at Royal Talens And Canson. If you remember we started our trip in Paris and made our way over to Amsterdam, stopping along the way to check out all the museums, galleries, and sights that each city offered.

We started our first day in Amsterdam with a boat tour of the canals to get acquainted with the many tiny streets and canals that zig zag throughout the city. Along the way we saw many amazing examples of dutch architecture, design, street art and of course Houseboats!

Street Art In The Woods- Not By Bansky

 

 

It seems that anytime someone finds a strange piece of art out in public the first thing they think is that Banksy was the culprit. This seemed to be the case when three strange and mystical wood carvings popped up in the woods of Knaresborough, North Yorkshire, UK. Carved into tree stumps these weren’t amateur carvings by stoned teenagers partying in the woods. With ornate details and precise craftsmanship any wood smith would be proud to call these their own. The Daily Mail caused an uproar stating that the pieces were carved by everyone’s favorite street art mystery man Banksy. However after some investigation by the BBC it was revealed that that the work was done by Tommy Craggs, who was commissioned by the person who owns the land that the sculptures were found on. Not sure why the Daily Mail didn’t start with checking who owned the land before going Bansky crazy but who’s got time to fact check when you could be selling some papers with phony headlines. 

To the Streets: Top Ten Public Works

Since my last post about Street Art Utopia’s “Best List” took off and caused a decent amount of response, I think it is important to involve the Cult’s own selection. Here you will find a carefully curated and crafted list of every imaginable kind of public form of expression and their respected historical contexts. More after the jump.

Banksy Sucks?

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We received an email today with the subject line: “anonymity is knowing everybody that knows of you” and the mysterious URL in the body: banksysucks.com. Followed the link to find the not-so-subtle .gif splash page above with a cheery midi rendition of the Cheers tune. (Presumably for its hook, “where everyone knows your name.”) Someone doesn’t like Bansky, I take it. Whether you love him or loathe him, Banksy has been the closest thing to this decade’s controversial Warholian art star. The site above clearly takes a jab at the fact that the identity of the internationally-famous British street artist is still “unknown.” Is Banksy still anonymous and “street” when the likes of Jude law and Brangelina shell out cool millions on his work? What do you think?