Impossibly Teeny Tiny Crochet Animals To Melt Your Heart

miniature-crocheted-animals-suami-3miniature-crocheted-animals-suami-15miniature-crocheted-animals-suami-13miniature-crocheted-animals-suami-17

Imagine your favorite teddy bear and or snuggly stuffed animal shrunken down to fit atop your fingertip, and you have the magical creations of Su Ami, an artistic company in Vietnam devoted to creating delightfully miniature crochet animals. The family run business includes only 5 expert craftsman who work to imbue the tiny woven creatures with unique and touching personalities.

Because of the animals’ itty bitty frame, each stitch is noticeable, highlighting the careful handmade nature of the work. In each turn of the yarn, we imagine the delicate movements of human fingers, and each being becomes impossibly precious. Heightening their dearness is the fact that delightful creatures are so easily lost; like microscopic pets, their vulnerability inspires us to cherish them and hold fast to their tiny bodies. In this way, the pieces recall the nostalgic yearning of a child for his toy.

Despite their smallness, each creation has an impressively distinct character.  With the slightest opening of the mouth, a gecko exudes a curious and playful attitude; a long-beaked bird stares in awe of her own crochet egg. Two squirrels tell a story, peering up at the sky in unison; similarly, a parent elephant watches over her child, whose plastic button eyes seek approval. A lion turns his head with a poignant frown, as if startled by his own size. All animals great and small, from the littlest snail to the tallest giraffe, inhabit the same magical space, cautiously yet courageously exploring the large world they miraculously inhabit. (via Demilked)

Kar­ley Feaver’s Stuffed Birds With Bizarre Haircuts

karley

karley2

karley3

karley5

New Zealand-based artist Kar­ley Feaver creates assemblages that involve a mix­ture of stuffed birds and various costume-like adornment ( human hair, gold plated metal, wood, and more). The artist claims that the animals she uses are ethically sourced and have died of natural causes.

Through her grotesque yet beautiful sculptures, the artist explores the idea of trans­for­ma­tion and adorn­ment, as her cur­rent inter­ests rest in nature’s abil­ity to sur­vive in dif­fer­ent forms by adapt­ing, adjust­ing, and mutat­ing into an increas­ingly man-made environment.

She intends to make these birds look other-worldly. Interestingly enough, she is successful at doing this by using materials that we are very familiar with (human hair, gold, and wood). She makes an interesting juxtaposition between the natural and the unnatural, the familiar and the unfamiliar- specifically to make a point about the unnatural efforts animals (in general) have to make in order to survive in a man-made environment.

Through the ages peo­ple have made beau­ti­ful things for them­selves and oth­ers by using mate­ri­als from their nearby envi­ron­ment. Birds are known to do the same, espe­cially when seek­ing to attract a mate. Feaver’s new works bring the image of beauty almost to the edge of absur­dity, their appear­ance is both bizarre and extra­or­di­nary, unlike any other crea­ture on earth.

(via Brown Paper Bag)

Advertise here !!!

Dirds- The Internets Latest Gift Is Cute/Disturbing Bird-Dog Mashups

Dirds

Dirds

Dirds

Dirds

‘Dirds’ is a series of Photoshopped images that combine the heads and bodies of birds and dogs. We’re not sure exactly who started this new internet craze but we have to admit that we can’t stop looking at these perplexing creatures.

Although they are incredibly cute, you might still find yourself thinking about how these flying pup hybrids are actually quite disturbing.

Photoshop allows us to have more power than ever before. We can literally make anything  come to a tangible existence.

What do you think about these ‘creations’?

Printer Uses Bird Poop To Do Exactly What You Might Think

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop

Fabrizio Lamoncha bird poop 1

Artist and desinger Fabrizio Lamoncha works with more than a little bit of humor.  His Pooprinter project statement begins with the quote “A common idiosyncratic habit in all birds is their inevitable punk nature to shit over our most precious belongings.”  The project is as innovative as it is gross.  Lamoncha slowly prints an alphabet on large sheets of paper by using strategically placed perches and the birds own droppings.  Check out the time-lapse video of the bird poop in action above and enjoy Lamoncha’s toungue-in-cheek explanation the project:

“A group of male zebra finches underwent this experiment with rigorous commitment. The author/captor, taking the role of some kind of 1984´s Big brother, is providing the implementation guidelines for the transformation of this countercultural attitude into a marketable artsy product. The observation of this group of non-breeding birds in captivity and the experimentation with induced behaviors has been rigorously documented for this task.” (via booooooom)

Photographs Of Birds Taken Through A Spotting Scope Expose Feathery Emotions

Carol Richards - Photography
Carol Richards - Photography Carol Richards - Photography

Holding her Nikon Digital SLR camera up to a spotting scope, Carol E. Richards examines a surprising array of feathery emotions akin to her own.

The use of two surfaces or buffers, sometimes three, if shot through a window, create a fascinating ring around each figure, a soft focused vignette of sorts, comparable to that of a toy camera. The result is an ambient deepening, apparent not only in the composition, but also in the subject matter and the artist’s  intrigue with trailing or meditating on each flighty movement.

Salvador Dali once said, “Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings.” On this note, Richards explores the act of bird watching as a certain mirroring, clearly exposing humanity’s inclination to anthropomorphize animals and as she asserts, “project qualities onto them that can be heartbreaking, sweet, or simply intriguing.”

Thus, in the vein of Dali’s quote, Richards shares with us her most recent collection: Birds Have Wings from Nazraeli Press.

Johan Scherft’s Unbelievably Realistic Paper Models Of Birds

Johan Scherft models1 Johan Scherft models8

Johan Scherft models5

These incredibly realistic birds are not alive – surprisingly they’re only paper models.  In fact, artist Johan Scherft out of only paper, glue, and paint.  He models each bird’s unique shape on his computer than constructs and paints the rest by hand.  While the fold-and-glue-tabs model provides each bird with their distinctive body shape, the realism is in Scherft’s careful painting.  He says of the painting, “For this part, I take the most time. With very fine brushes, I try to achieve the most realistic effect in color and detail. I use watercolors or gouache paint. It’s always an exciting moment once the template has been painted to assemble the bird and see what the result is.”  [via]

The Understated Dreaminess of Meghan Howland’s Paintings

The story of Meghan Howland‘s oil paintings are quiet like a secret.  Her work captures understated dreamy scenes.  A confusion of birds, hidden faces, a scarf that may or may not be choking its wearer – her work at once is lighthearted and hints at a darker undercurrent.
Her gallery relates, “Her paintings are often dreamlike, and yet carry a weight of something that is slightly more dissonant. The question of whether something is safe or dangerous, loving or hateful, is often unexplained in her work.”

A snapshot quality to the image, fill flash like lighting, lends the paintings the characteristic of a caught instant.  However, her painterly hand stretches the moment.  While definitely working a contemporary aesthetic, Howland’s paintings are at times reminiscent of Degas’ style and palette.

Chris Jordan’s Photographs of Bird Carcasses With Stomachs Full Of Plastic

“On Midway Atoll, a remote cluster of islands more than 2000 miles from the nearest continent, the detritus of our mass consumption surfaces in an astonishing place: inside the stomachs of thousands of dead baby albatrosses. The nesting chicks are fed lethal quantities of plastic by their parents, who mistake the floating trash for food as they forage over the vast polluted Pacific Ocean.

For me, kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth. Like the albatross, we first-world humans find ourselves lacking the ability to discern anymore what is nourishing from what is toxic to our lives and our spirits. Choked to death on our waste, the mythical albatross calls upon us to recognize that our greatest challenge lies not out there, but in here.

~cj, Seattle, February 2011″

For updates on Chris Jordan”s upcoming film MIDWAY, visit www.midwayjourney.com.

More pictures after the jump!