Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Progress Photos Of Large Murals in Boston from Os Gemeos

Renowned Brazilian brothers/collaborators Os Gemeos, known for their huge street art murals featuring vivid colors and strange, yellow dudes, just opened a show at Boston’s ICA. While the bros are in town, they’re getting up with two large pieces that are starting to look like some of their best work yet. If your grandmother still thinks that public art is a nuisance, then show her these gorgeous process photos. And if you’re on the east coast, a road trip may be in order before the summer’s out. The show at ICA/Boston runs until November, 25.

Tomorrow is Here, a solo exhibition by Suzannah Sinclair

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Samsøn is proud to present Suzannah Sinclair’s 2nd solo exhibition with the gallery: “Tomorrow is Here” from March 26 – May 1st, 2010: Artist’s Reception Friday, March 26 / 6-8pm

The new ocean paintings are 8 x 11 inches; the size of a page from these same vintage men’s magazines devoid of figures.

“They are sometimes from advertisements trying to convey a warm easy feeling that embody the beauty and stillness that I find in the women I paint. I like the pairing of ‘Sister What a Good Time’: landscape, that insane feeling of getting lost in the depths of someone’s eyes or the blue depth of the ocean.”

The works will be installed in an environment complete with lamps, rugs, Bertoia benches and pots/planters with plants setting a stage for comfort, suggestion & space-time. A mirror can be part of a scene without the figure through reflection.

“I like the word ‘quietude’. Just saying…”

Suzannah Sinclair was born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1979 and currently resides in NY, NY
450 Harrison Ave. / 29 Thayer St. Boston, MA 02118
T 617.357.7177