Behind-the-Scenes with “Art Works Every Time” Artist: Brian Willmont

above: Brian Willmont's Studio; below: "Long Gone" 2009

above: Brian Willmonts Studio, below: "Long Gone" 2009

Today’s Art Works Every Time interview is with Brian Willmont. His vibrant colors and energetic compositions command attention like a shot of tequila in the fluorescent glow of a Vegas dive bar. Read on to see more of Brian’s South West inspired “Clint Eastwood fever dream” works. Also, with just one week left to go before our exhibition, stay tuned for a new artist interview every day, starting Monday!

Kooky Cacti- New Works by Brian Willmont

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Brian Willmont (who we featured in Book 3) recently added a new selection of works to his portfolio. His wacky wild west cast of cacti include Clint Eastwood style brambly bandoleers and prickly pistol-iers. The spook of the frontier’s ghost towns, outlaws and mining carts are infused with Brian’s unique sense of humor. I mean really, what’s better than a desert plant sporting oversized cowboy hats and shades?

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New work by Brian Willmont

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Brian Willmont has some lovely new futuristic medieval paintings that detail fantastical conquests of ancient and not so ancient allegorical lands.

Interview: Brian Willmont

Brian Willmont is a multi-talented creative. Along with his partner, Cody Hoyt, he spearheads Apenest, a design/art collective that self-produces collaborative silkscreens, graphics and a stunning full color book showcasing a stable of brilliant contemporary artists. Beautiful/Decay recently received a copy of their book and was blown away by the attention to design and the quality of the artists included. As an artist, Willmont also creates invididual work—his stunning works on paper detail an idiosyncratic personal vocabulary, often leaning towards fantastical situations, brightly colored in a hyperspectra of acid-induced prismatic color. Lurking beneath the enticing exterior, however, a darker, more apocalyptic narrative manifests itself; apparent in Willmont’s depiction of decaying architectural structures and implied destruction.