Marcos Montané’s Incredibly Intricate Wire Sculptures That Reference Science

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Marcos Montané is a Buenos Aires-based Art Director who says he is “experimenting in the fields of procedural design, generative graphics and visual music.” His work is expressed in typography, visual design and audio-reactive visuals for VJ sets. Perhaps his most striking work is what he differentiates as some of his ‘still’ works, wire sculptures that recall natural, repeating readouts from a Richter scale, echoes, orbital fields or cellular biology.

In works like his Flowfields I & Flowfields II (above, and below – grouped and singular), Montané explains his inspiration and process “I was always amazed by the visualizations of flowfields that return some 3d softwares. In this case I used a topology optimization software and export the resulting lines to turn them into wire structures. The final result is a compact mass of wires.” The mass of wires takes on the appearance of sound waves solidified, equal parts organized yet chaotic(-looking).

Montané’s One-Piece Structures (below, with white backgrounds) are generated structures from a single piece of wire. Although simpler in their construction, the One-Piece Structures (which are named and numbered as Variations) equally complicated geometries, such as computer landscapes, GPS-tracking fields or sonar readouts.

You can follow Marcos Montané’s work at his Tumblr and Flickr accounts.

Artist Collective DOMA’s Insane Output of Fun, Creative Work

 

Argentinian collective DOMA (Julian Pablo Manzelli, Mariano Barbieri, Orilo Blandini, Matias Vigliano) have a long track record putting on absurdist installations, performances, “happenings”, etc. They also run Turbo Gallery in Buenos Aires. They design characters and toys, and direct videos as well. Insane. Even with such extraordinary output, DOMA doesn’t seem to have overly serious ideas about their work. Even worksfeaturing severed limbs or raw meat and blood splatters take on an air of fun, creative freedom. Check out some of their previous projects below (furry dudes, robots, futuristic machines- all the good stuff). (via)

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Pop Culture Installation Exhibit from Thank You Very Much! Artist Collective

Thank You Very Much, an artist collective out of Buenos Aires, looks like a really cool, ambitious group. Limiting access to different creative vehicles is never a good thing, and TYVM is definitely not trying to do so. Working with over 40 artists from around the world, they’ve got their hands in everything: production, exhibition, design/marketing, etc. Recently, co-director Luciano Podcaminsky staged in exhibition of five installation pieces at the Centro Cultural Recoleta in B.A. The show, which “mixes conceptual art with POP culture”, gives you a good idea of what the collective is interested in doing. Find more images and some words from Podcaminsky on the exhibit after the jump.

Carmen Burguess

Picture 3 Carmen Burguess is an artist born in Bueno Aires, now living in Berlin. Her work is grotesque… in a way that seems to make you want to see more. Her Seventeen Magazine modified covers are creepy meets couture.