Michael Wolf’s Hypnotic Photographs Document Hong Kong’s Architectural Density

Michael Wolf Michael Wolf photography Michael Wolf photos

For his series, “The Architecture of Density,” German photographer Michael Wolf captures the intense suffocating density of the city of Hong Kong. The framing of the buildings and apartment units creates a flattened, patterned image with details of individual residencies apparent only on closer inspection. The result is an abstraction that gives the appearance of infinity, as if these incredibly compact and dense structures never end. Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in the world, with an overall density of around 6,700 people per square kilometer, a fact you may recall from a previously featured photography series of the city’s cramped slums.

Wolf’s work is primarily concerned with urban landscapes and places, not always in such an objective, distanced manner. His series, Tokyo Compression, captures Tokyo subway users’ faces pressed up onto the glass of the subway car, a result of the overcrowding of this form of transportation. No matter the proximity to his subjects, Wolf offers a new perspective on the movement and energy of city life in his documentation of its density. (via curious history)

Yin Xiuzhen Builds Elaborate Cities With Clothes And Suitcases (Soundtrack Included)



For Portable Cities, Chinese artist Yin Xiuzhen constructs small-scale cities out of discarded clothing and other fabric inside suitcases that she also equips with speakers, giving each city its own soundtrack. Each suitcase also has a small hole you can peer into to see an actual map of the constructed city. For installations, Xiuzhen maps the cities with string on the gallery wall. Xiuzhen was inspired by her own travels, waiting for her luggage, and the sense that she was traveling with her home. Some of the cities she has constructed include Berlin, Vancouver, Seattle, New York, and her hometown of Beijing.

“People in our contemporary setting have moved from residing in a static environment to becoming souls in a constantly shifting transience. The suitcase becomes the life support container of modern living…” she told Walker Art. “The holder of the continuous construction of a human entity.” via

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The Cut Paper City Sculptures of Matthew Picton

Matthew Picton sculpture9

Matthew Picton sculpture10Matthew Picton sculpture2

 

The work of Matthew Picton is something more than a map, even something more than a model city.  He meticulously builds cities from paper.  Each buildings wall is built from a strip of paper leaving its interior empty.  In a way his three dimensional maps get at the personality of a city.  Speaking about cartography Picton says,

“There is some intrinsic quality to cartography that goes beyond the scientific document – a beauty of form and detail, a record of past times and places, something that lives as a world in which imagination can flow; places to re-visit, places to re-imagine, a world to re-make itself in the imagination.”     [via]

Several of his pieces depict cities before and after a natural disaster or war.  The charred strips of paper mark burnt or crumbled buildings.  Pockets of burnt paper seem more like injuries than a cold record of a past fact.

The Shrunken Cities of Ben Thomas’ Photography

Ben Thomas photography Ben Thomas photography

Ben Thomas photography

These are not photos of miniatures or models.  Rather these are images from photographer Ben ThomasCityshrinker series and are actual cities around the world.  Thomas uses what is called a ’tilt-shift technique’.  Among other things, the technique basically corrects the distortion caused by perspective.  This correction often has the appearance of miniaturizing the camera’s subject.  Thomas’ images present the world as if it were a toy.  Some of the world’s largest cities seem to shrink into playful places.  The images turn a lighthearted eye onto some of our favorite places. [via]