Katrina Grosse’s Gigantic Installations Of Brightly Painted Soil

Katharina Grosse installation1 Katharina Grosse installation2

Katharina Grosse installation4

The installations of Katharina Grosse are disorienting in scale, color, and material.  Her use of color is wild bordering on violent.  Brightly colored paint is sprayed over any surface the artist pleases, from the floor to walls and windows.  Huge heaps of painted dirt fill the gallery space transforming the space from an architectural to a geological one.  The dirt, paint, and various objects seem to intentionally undermine the white box that houses the installation.  Her installations raucously question the very space they inhabit by allowing visitors experience it in a transformative way.

Pure Color Glows In Fog Installation

Ann Veronica Janssens installation8 Ann Veronica Janssens installation3

Some of Ann Veronica Janssens‘ work is clearly and singularly about color.  For a number of her installations, Janssens’ uses a color film that transforms the light shining through it.  She then fills the space with an artificial fog which seems to glow with color.  The fog acts as a vehicle to carry the light and spread it into the air of the space; a way to experience color and only color.  There is no depth, texture, or line but just color and its saturation.  The installations create a dreamy atmosphere when any medium between color and the eye seems to disappear.

Advertise here !!!

Documenting Ephemeral Underwater Ink Sculptures

Alberto Seveso - Photography

Alberto Seveso - PhotographyAlberto Seveso - Photography

Alberto Seveso’s high speed photographs of ink mixing with water are hypnotic and fascinating. Each shot depicts pushes of color twisting and bending with an emotive cadence, lulling itself into an ephemeral sculpture, detailed with sharp visceral attention.

Although such imagery is not new, per se, this specific collection feels intrinsically magnetic due to the captive nature of submerged color naturally bonding or relating before diluting. It’s more about documenting the ease of abstraction than pushing a forced abstract agenda.

The Luminaria’s Colorful and Inflatable Architecture

Architects of Air1 Architects of Air10

Architects of Air6

Luminaria by Architects of Air is a touring inflatable structure.  The ‘building’ has made stops internationally since 1992.  Visitors to the Luminaria remove their shoes and enter an air lock.  Once through the airlock visitors are free to roam the structure.  The Luminaria is built of inflated PVC.  Sunlight from outside shines through the various colors of PVC creating an otherworldly glow.  The highly saturated colors coupled with the gently curving walls and floor give the Luminaria a subtle biological nature.  Interestingly one visitor describes the structure as ” Somewhere between a womb and a cathedral.”

Pixels and Blocks in Real Life from Pard Morrison

The work of artist Pard Morrison seems to reference both the analog and the digital at once.  His hard edged fields of color are reminiscent of image pixels or two dimensional mock ups of some sort.  Morrison often contrasts these blocks of color with a natural landscape barely touched by technology.  His work addresses how experience is increasingly mediated by technology – how a three-dimensional landscape is increasingly lived in two dimensions.  While these pixels and blocks build many images we experience everyday, they also can hide and obfuscate them. [via]

Carlos Cruz Diez’ Ultra-Colorful Light Installations

 

Carlos Cruz Diez‘ choice medium in his installation Chromosaturation is simply color.  While we’re accustomed to seeing many different colors constantly and simultaneously, Diez uses only three colors presented one at a time as a departure point: red, green, and blue.  Diez saturates a room with one of these single primary colors of light.  The color floods from room to room, interacting with other colors, creating entirely new hues.  The light immerses the gallery space so thoroughly that the color almost takes on a physical aspect.  In his statement, Diez says:

“The Chromosaturation can act as a trigger, activating in the viewer the notion of color as a material or physical situation, going into space without the aid of any form or even without any support, regardless of cultural beliefs.”

Yuichi Hirako’s Animistic Realities

Yuichi Hirako is a Japanese artist whose paintings and sculptures blend humans, the city, and the forest together into in alternate, animistic realities. The works feel like they’re made by someone who feels life around them as one unified force and doesn’t envision a cataclysmic end to humanity, but just a change in how our form of life is expressed biologically. In Hirako’s work, it’s as though a nuclear catastrophe had dissolved the boundaries between all life forms on earth, leaving behind husks of cars, trees that grow houses, varicolored trees and rivers, and people who have very literally become one with nature.  It’s interesting to think about alternate possibilities for life on earth, and if humanity does decide to use all our nuclear weapons, I hope we end up in Hirako’s paintings.

Mathew Zefeldt’s Paint People

Hold on to your eyeballs, Matthew Zefeldt‘s paintings just might wipe them out. Matthew’s enormous paintings seem to use every possible color and it’s obvious that he doesn’t just “like color”– he loves it, and is really good at it. Using color to give control thick, abstract figures form and depth, and flattening his pedestals, Zefeldt’s paintings are a new and wonderful take on impasto abstraction, so thick that some of them look more like a gum wall than a painting. His work is also great because he uses his goopy application to show what portrait paintings really are–paint! But instead of taking a cynical approach to the problem–”oh no, how could we be attaching so much significance and power to these things that are really just a bunch of paint”–his view seems more enthusiastic, as if to say, “yes, this is a bunch of paint–that’s why they’re the best!” I can’t wait to see more. If you want to see some in person, he has a piece hanging until the 10th in a FFDG Gallery group show  The Diamond Sea  along with curiot and lots of other young up and comers. If you’re not in the bay area, you can see more of his work after the jump.