Subtle But Colorful Abstract Street Art

108 Street Art9

Abstract Street Art 2

Abstract Street Art

The work of the street artist known as 108 is much like his pseudonym: simple and mysterious.  Often large black masses of abstract street art inhabit walls.  Devoid of most or any detail, these masses are frequently punctuated by bursts of color.  In a way the colorful abstractions feel like offshoots or biological growths on the larger black masses.  There is a larger flow to his murals that are somehow familiar.  The shapes, the way interact with their surfaces, and the way in interacts with itself feels organic.  108 explains this idea in a 2006 interview saying:

“Usually I work in public spaces, you know, and the background is the most important thing. I must find a good shapes for that place, usually I prefer old walls and abandoned places, and my “thing” grow by it self, as a tree or moss did, but I know nature do that really better than me! It’s very hard for me to work on a blank white surface… in that situations I must find a good inspiration elsewhere, maybe in another work I did before or working with a good friend with good ideas.”

Other times his abstract murals almost hint at an iconography, symbols, or recognizable shapes.  Like much abstraction there is a lot of room for interpretation.  Still, he goes on to say:

“Most of my works come from my unconscious and are totally irrational. You can see the abstract, soft and gloomy shapes… My works are also very symbolic. The same old example of the wheel, I found it in my unconscious, it was a big fixation for me… usually I have drawn it with 8 rays inside… In fact it was the sun wheel, one of the most important symbol in ancient Indoeuropean cultures (you can find it in a lot of Indian and Celtic stuff). This is just one example.”

Honoring The 1980s With Sacred Geometry

West-Space_01Amy Joy Watson - Sculpture Amy Joy Watson - Sculpture

There is something fantastically unworldly yet alluringly familiar about Amy Joy Watson’s bright sculptures. Whether it’s a drooping bow or a glitter-filled orb, this Australian’s artful structures feel like a 1986 birthday party, translated or abstracted by a video game of that same era: there are no soft edges, only the disjointed illusion of it.

To make each piece, Watson stitches or glues together watercolor-stained balsa wood, occasionally adding a tasteful Gobstopper here, or helium balloon there, to garnish her own primal sense of whimsy and sacred geometry, resulting in a somewhat spiritual monument to another imaginative age and time.

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The Surveyor Tape Installations of Megan Geckler

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The slick site specific installations of Megan Geckler beam and bounce of walls like lasers.    Her installations’ ultra clean geometric forms and bright colors nearly hide the personal quality to the work.  The plastic rays are actually made of flagging tape – the kind you find just off the sidewalk typically used by surveyors.  Her installations intentionally bounce between art and design, industrial and hand made, cold and personal.  Also, just as her work shifts conceptually, it also shifts in shape from angle to angle.  Strands at one angle interact with strands at other angles as a viewer moves through the space. [via]

Rebecca Baumann’s Party Streamer Installations

Australian based artist Rebecca Baumann often uses what appear to be party supplies to build sculptures and installations.  Her art interacts with the surrounding air – the space it occupies and even the breeze that makes it dance.  From a bus station teeming inside with colorful streamers to vibrant books flapping in the wind, Baumann’s work is unexpectedly playful.  However, the temporary nature of her materials and the relatively short-lived ‘performances’ of her installations hint at something much more weighty behind each piece.

Colorful Mounds of Sugar Form Fantasy Landscapes in Pip and Pop’s Installation Work

 

These bright, candied installation pieces are the work of Australian artist Tanya Schultz. Working under the name Pip & Pop, Schultz employs sugar, glitter, fake flowers, and a myriad of other materials to produce the colorful mounds of awesomeness. It’s not a far stretch to picture the works as actual landscapes- to fantasize about walking around in Pip & Pop’s unique world. Diabetes was never so easy on the eyes ’til now. More after the jump. (via)

Bright Colored Silouettes In Vintage Photography t by Hayley Warnham

 

I like these digital collage works from British artist Hayley Warnham. Solid, bright color meets vintage 1940′s, 50′s, and 60′s personal photography in the pictures, which capture a nostalgic, innocent vibe. The use of flat color with found photography evokes the work of legendary American artist John Baldesarri. We wonder if he was a direct influence on Warnham. A lot of these are composed in such away that suggests the vantage point of a youngster, which reminds you of a time when things were much simpler. When skylines and relatives may as well have been flat blocks of color with very little texture as far as you were concerned. You didn’t yet grasp the complexities of every person and setting in your life, and everything was a mysterious wall of impenetrable brightness. (via)

Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via)

The Flowing, Often Colorful Compositions of Matthias Duwel

 

Matthias Duwel’s abundantly colorful paintings and black and white drawings operate in dynamic transition between clutter and streamlined clarity. Düwel’s work centers on the idea of flux, excess and superabundance. At first glance, the environmental issues addressed in his pieces deflect recognition, due to the skillful use of unique color spaces-from chromatic grays to highly saturated pinks, greens, blues and violets.

The worlds Düwel constructs are reminiscent of amusement parks, camouflaging so to speak the seriousness of the subject-matter. His chaotically vivid, whirlwind compositions spin out of control, however upon closer inspection, little areas of respite, little Edens appear: a snow globe, an Airstream trailer, a suburban enclave.
These idealized enclaves produce the realization that only deep inside ourselves, within the confines of our own inner sanctum, can we find the stability that we as humans inherently seek…our personal Eden.

Martha Otero Gallery in Los Angeles opens a solo exhibition of Duwel’s work entitled Eden on August 4th.