Kara Joslyn’s Quietly Emotional Paintings

CCA grad Kara Joslyn is based in Oakland. Joslyn works mostly in black and white and mixed media to create stark, quietly emotional paintings. There’s a lot of hardened dignity in the artist’s work. The black and white depictions here of crumbling stone, ancient pottery, and dried parcels of wood can’t help but lend a resolute seriousness to each painting. This (and their stunning visual qualities) allows them to be taken in with purpose, as though something very special is captured and any time spent with the work is not wasted. By rendering material which was once strong and hard in a state of brokenness and neglect,  Joslyn brings us to considerations of the inevitable effects of neglect and time, and the realization that hardly anything remains prominent forever.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Melted Wooden Picture Frames from Bonsoir Paris

 

These are amazing. Duramen is a series of wooden sculptures depicting melted picture frames from French design collective Bonsoir Paris. The level of craftsmanship with these handmade works (sculpted by Adrien Coroller) is tops. The dynamic in play between the fine wood used and the decaying, deathly manner in which it is presented nicely illustrates how even the most supple, healthy aspects of life can easily fall from grace. The picture frame reference is a nice touch, forcing us to call into question our very perception and take into account its tendency to directly affect the practical world. Bonsoir Paris, founded by Morgan Maccari and Remy Clemente, has only been around since 2010, but if they continue to push forward in a direction that allows for the production of more work of this quality, they should do fine. (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Olivier Garraud Creates an installation with rotting food, maggots, and flies

 

French artist Olivier Garraud has created Second Life, an installation that encapsulates the life cycle of flies in real time. The piece consists of two parts: an apparatus that allows flies access to food, and a tube filled with maggots and flies connected to an amplifier. Second Life allows us to examine the relatively short life-span of an insect on concise, bare bones terms, generating a context which can be applied to personal events. More images after the jump, and you can also check out a video of the installation in action here.

Currently Trending

Matt Bahen- Life in Death

Toronto artist Matt Bahen creates thick oil paintings of desolate scenery and, often, dogs. Tweaked just right, the lighting in Bahen’s work almost renders itself the subject in each respective canvas, creating a sense that the elements most “alive” in his world are not, in fact, animate. Scavenging dogs and dying foliage or crops are often the only living organisms depicted in Bahen’s most recent work. And though a veritable source of  action, these elements often serve more as secondary, blended, narrative connections than primary statements. In keeping with the aesthetics of B/D, this body of work presents a perfect opportunity to  draw as much life from the dead as from the living. Bahen is currently showing at LE Gallery in Toronto in a solo exhibition entitled “After Wolves.” If you’re up that way, do not miss out.

Currently Trending

Daniel Danger

With a name like Daniel Danger, well, a certain excess of awesome is expected of you. Danger delivers. The product of an artistically-inclined family, Danger is an illustrator, printmaker, and musician working out of New England. His works feature mysterious figures wandering the midnight-shaded streets of cities in decay. Spirits rise in unison from old houses and barns where now dreams of daylight lie interred. Shadows loom, larger-than-life (or death?) in urban sprawl and twisted forest alike. Each piece tells its own dark tale.

Currently Trending

Future Perfect Honorable Mentions (Day 1)

Back in March B/D teamed up with Toyota Prius to bring you the Future Perfect Project.  Due to certain circumstances beyond our control we couldn’t consider submissions from international artists. However that didn’t stop hundreds of loyal international B/D readers to send in work. We figured that the only honorable way to approach the situation would be to feature all of these artists day by day in a short series. For day numero uno we bring to you Tom Dorkin, a 21 year old illustrator from London who is quite creative when it comes to showing off the natural detail in decay. Maybe the only way our future will be perfect is if we realize our commonality in being decaying mammals and that we must seize the day rather than waste away.

Currently Trending

Lori Nix’s Small Scale Worlds Of Decay

These may look like photographs of abandoned buildings but in fact they are photographs of meticulously made dioramas by Lori Nix. Each image is painstakingly created by hand, taking into consideration scale and lighting over the course of seven months. The result is an apocalyptic vision of the world where everything has fallen apart, decayed, and is slowly returning back to nature.

Currently Trending

Martin Ouellette’s Decaying Objects

Martin Ouellete’s painting s are inspired by macro photographs of decaying objects found within the urban landscape; details of worn out magazines, wires, rusted nails or wooden poles layered with staples and torn up paper. These mass-produced items are used to serve a momentary purpose then left to decay in their natural surroundings.

Currently Trending