Finland’s Lighting Design Collective Transforms A Silo Into A Modern Lighthouse

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Helsinki, Finland is already known for its beautiful landscapes, sonorous Baltic coastlines and for its focus on civic design (the city having been named the World Design Capital of 2012). To celebrate this honor, Helsinki tapped Madrid-based design firm Lighting Design Collective (LDC) to create a permanent urban art light piece.

Named for the repurposed oil silo, Silo 468 is a project for the cities residents to enjoy from the inside and out. The silo’s walls feature more than 2,000 perforated holes which echo ideas of a traditional lighthouse, displaying an incredible light show for Helsinki’s Kruunuvuorenranta district. While the coastline is illuminated by the modern lighthouse, the inside of Silo 468 offers a different, more intimate experience. Painted a deep, captivating red, there is an additional light show for citizens to enjoy.

The Director of LDC, Tapio Rosenius, fully explained the project. “At night 1250 white LED’s flicker and sway on the surface of the silo controlled by a bespoke software mimicking swarms of birds in flight – a reference to silo´s seaside location. The prevailing winds, well-known to those living in Helsinki, are used to trigger different light patterns in real time.

‘The enduring fascination of the complex movement of light and the amazing location by the sea will make this a captivating experience for the visitors and the residents of Helsinki.” (via designmilk and u1u11. Photos by Hannu Iso-oja, Tuomas Uusheimo, and Tapio Rosenius.)

Van Orton Design’s Stained-Glass Style 80′s Movie Posters

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Italian-based twin brother design team (who go by the nom de guerre) Van Orton Design created a hit recently with their latest project of stained-glass style movie posters. Digitally composing the images using iconic characters and scenes from each film, Van Orton replaced saints and religious iconography with pop-culture standards like the Terminator, The Joker and Jack Burton, juxtaposing them with the time-honored (and increasingly disappearing) art of stained glass sectioning.

Van Orton’s selection of now-classic films from the science-fiction, action and cult fantasy genres adds an interesting element to the genesis of these designs, in that they seem to replicate stained glass coloring books more than the classical stained glass reminiscent of Europe’s grand cathedrals. This design choice adds to the light-hearted and nostalgic mood of the series, and appropriately separates it from ‘high art’ (though the Batman Poster for example certainly has visual similarities to the work of famous British artists Gilbert & George). The combination of thin and thicker black lines (replicating the lead used to secure colored glass) holds a wide prismatic array of colors, which also brings a unique, crisp quality which can only be achieved through delicate digital design.

You can purchase your own posters (pre-colored or not) by Van Orton Design here.

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Sebastian Errazuirz Crafts Shoes To Memorialize His Ex Lovers

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Sebastian Errazuriz - Shoes

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In Sebastian Errazuirz’s series 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers, he constructed wearable memorials to the women of his past relationships. Each shoe is designed with a specific person in mind, and is accompanied by short anecdotes. They give us a context for the relationship and why it ultimately failed. For this project, the artist paired with shoe maker Melissa (who has also partnered with the likes of  Vivienne Westwood and Karl Lagerfeld) and made shoes featuring faux honeycombs, tiny gold men, icicles, arrows, and more.  Melissa is known for producing high-quality plastic shoes, and pairing with the artist reflects their quirky-yet-stylish aesthetic.

In Sebastian Errazuirz’s series 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers, he constructed wearable memorials to the women of his past relationships. Each shoe is designed with a specific person in mind, and is accompanied by short anecdotes. They give us a context for the relationship and why it ultimately failed. For this project, the artist paired with shoe maker Melissa (who has also partnered with the likes of  Vivienne Westwood and Karl Lagerfeld) and made shoes featuring faux honeycombs, tiny gold men, icicles, arrows, and more.  Melissa is known for producing high-quality plastic shoes, and pairing with the artist reflects their quirky-yet-stylish aesthetic.

“Honey” was very touched and said she didn’t know she had that impact on me. “Heart Breaker” wrote me an email to say she didn’t know if she should feel incredibly embarrassed, enraged or honored but that if I ever revealed her real name she would kill me. “Gold Digger” hates my guts.

While this project is one-sided (none of the ex lovers offer a rebuttal), it’s a very interesting way to pay homage to relationships that, good or bad, have impacted Errazuriz’s life. Designing the shoes, recounting each episode, and sharing his personal life with the world has hopefully had a cathartic effect on the artist, in addition to delighting viewers. (Via Bored Panda)

Fabrican- Science And Fashion Blend Together In incredible Spray On Fabric

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Joining 3D printing and digital textile printing, the idea of a sprayable, wearable and fabric has the inventors of Fabrican LTD imaging the possibilities which go beyond its initial usage in the fashion industry. Fabrican’s ‘Euraka!’ moment came from another famous canned sprayable, Silly String. The science of the process involves the creation of a liquid suspension which is then applied using a spray gun or aerosol canister. The resulting sprayed fabric has natural, synthetic and recycled fiber options, and when applied typically feels like a breathable suede.

Practical applications have ranged past fashion shows into automobile interiors, furniture upholstery and even entire rooms (the material is easily washable). The fabric can be embedded with a variety of supplements and additives which make separate colors, patterns and   (which also opens up the possibilities of quick-creating medical applications such as casts, bandages and even antiseptic-wound cleansing).

According to Fabrican-inventor, Spanish fashion designer Manel Torres, “As a non-woven material, Spray-on Fabric offers possibilities for binding, lining, repairing, layering, covering and moulding in ways previously not imaginable.”

Watch a slightly NSFW video of Fabrican LTD in action after the jump!

Hair As Typography

Monique Goossens

Monique Goossens

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Designer Monique Goossens transforms the hair left behind on the garbage, shower drain and/or combs into a work of typography.

Monique Goossens’ work includes elements of both design and organic art. The concept is disturbing yet brilliant, and design has never seen something quite like this before. Although her idea challenges established conceptions of function [and aesthetics], her work doesn’t stray away from the bizarre and amusing.

“The hair letters consist of hundreds of hairs, and give the impression of being fine pen drawings. The basic shape of the letters is created by forming the hairs into a legible character, during which process I follow the natural characteristics of the hairs: curly, rounded corners, springiness. To a great extent, it is the dynamic of the hairs which determines the shape of the letters. The ends of the hairs create an organized chaos, an energetic play of lines which forms a haze around the letter’s basic shape.”

The Amsterdam based artist studied Interior Design and Styling at Academie Artemis. Shortly after, she became interested in the relationship between photography and design, so she continued her studies at the Design Academy in Eindhoven.

Camilla Wordie Creates Edible Textiles

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Food art is back from the dead! And you thought that those crazy Fluxus artists from the 60’s were long gone…

Scandinavian artist Camilla Wordie creates textiles out of textures found in our daily eats. Her project is a synthesis of her love for both the culinary world and the arts. Edible textiles extends from Wordie’s other food-related productions (Am I chocolate or not? and Wearing Rice is Nice) which include tableware inspired by grains of rice and tables made of chocolate powder.

Geometric Wooden Textile Art By Elisa Strozyk

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Elisa Strozyk is a unconventional textile designer. Instead of fabric, she uses wood to construct rugs, carpets, and blankets. While we often think of wood as rigid surface, her work breaks this convention and transforms it into something much cozier.  Elisa’s textile art acts like fabric. They easily conform to a surface and can bunch together, allowing something or someone to be wrapped up in wood.

Each piece is comprised of tiny shapes, variations of triangles and squares. Paired together they make tessellations, or the tiling of shapes to insure there are no gaps between them. Tessellations can be in 2D or in Elisa’s case, 3D. The general idea is that shapes are used to stack and fill space.

These textiles are meant to have us consider a new perspective on material. They challenge our notions of what is possible out of something like wood. Elisa’s textiles can be functional or art object. They can be used as a blanket or on the floor as a rug. But, depending on the design, context, and manipulation of shapes, they can be a sculpture, too.

Elisa gives more insight to her work, writing:

The world around us is becoming increasingly immaterial. We are now used to write emails instead of letters, to pay online, to download music and touch virtual buttons on touch screens. We live in a society of images, a visual culture full of colours, advertisements, television and the internet. There is not much left to feel. Giving importance to surfaces that are desirable to touch can reconnect us with the material world and enhance the emotional value of an object.

“Wooden Textiles” convey a new tactile experience. We are used to experience wood as a hard material; we know the feeling of walking across wooden floors, to touch a wooden tabletop or to feel the bark of a tree. But we usually don’t experience a wooden surface which can be manipulated by touch.

 

Taxidermy And Furniture Blend As Disturbing Comment On Consumer Culture

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Designer Armin Blasbichler‘s work is often jarring.  His series ORSON, I’m Home strikes a special chord, though.  The series is composed of three “dining sculptures” created primarily from the bodies of various farm animals.  While we may be more accustomed to farm animals adorning plates on the furniture, seeing them as taxidermy furniture makes for a surreal juxtaposition.  The furniture confronts its users with the consumption it usually facilitates.  Interestingly, for the series Blasbichler features a quote from professor and writer Don Slater: “In talking of modern society as a consumer culture, people are not referring simply to a particular pattern of needs and objects […] but to a culture of consumption.”