Mataerial: The Incredible 3D Drawing Machine

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Mataerial Introduction from Mataerial on Vimeo.

One of the most talked about trends in the creative community is 3D printing and its potential.  A collaboration between the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia and Joris Laarman Studio created a machine that is perhaps more appropriately considered a 3D drawing tool called Mataerial.  The machine extrudes a thermosetting polymer: a material that, due to a chemical reaction, comes out of the nozzle virtually dry and set.  This means that Mataerial is able to construct designs without the need of a level base.  The tools creations can even be extruded of a vertical surface, directly off the wall.  [via]

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From Wearable Huts To Fiber Light Forms

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Doug Johnston’s imagination knows no boundaries. His list of interests and mediums includes architecture, photography, installation, performance, music, and fiber art– which primarily involves stitching nylon thread around coiled rope to create functionally simple, yet playful forms.

His collection of weaving, shown here for example, includes a “wearable hut” for those looking for a unconventional dose of “anonymity and privacy” and deliciously modern “light sculptures” which structurally investigate varying unconventional shapes.

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Precariously Perched Concrete Blocks By Fabrice Le Nezet

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Artist and designer Fabrice Le Nezet‘s series Measure precariously positions concrete blocks.  Using metal tubing, Le Nezet supports the concrete in way that makes the industrial materials seem nearly organic.  The brightly colored pipes cling to the concrete like webs.  His intention with the work was to make the materials and its weight easily felt.  He says:

“I worked here on a physical representation of the idea of measure. The objective was to ‘materialize’ tension in a sense, to make the notions of weight, distance and angle palpable…This work lies in the context of my search for purification around raw materials such as concrete and metal. This is why I played with simple shapes which catch light and transcend the volume structure.”

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Beth Galton’s Photographs Of Cut Soup, Doughnuts, Coffee And More

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Beth Galton‘s series Cut Food is a side of food photography rarely seen – the inside.  Galton is a prolific photographer specializing in food.  While she works primarily in advertising and commercial photography, Cut Food is one of several conceptual projects from Galton.  The series captures common foods, though some not so commonly sliced in half.  Canned soups and a cup of coffee seem to rest perfectly in half of a container.  In order to catch some of these Galton replaced the liquids in the foods with a gelatin.

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David Adey’s Intricate Collages Of Pinned Together Magazine Parts

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To suggest that David Adey builds art from recycled materials would be an understatement. He develops intricate patterns from previous design work. Each celebrity limb or fashion savvy lip is delicately cut out, then pinned and pieced together on a foam board, without any digitalized color manipulation; he does, however, use a Google search to locate the parts for his palette and develop an arrangement.

His process, Adey admits, is terribly methodical, time consuming, and detail oriented, however, this is exactly the point. He states, “For me as an artist, it’s a matter of developing or choosing your own constraints. Finding them and embracing them as a tool to make the work.” Echoing a similar sentiment put forth by the father of design himself, Charles Eames, Adey continues: “Without constraints, you don’t have anything. That’s the whole design process — working within constraints.”

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Laser-Cut Wooden Records

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These aren’t your typical vinyl records.  Actually, they’re not vinyl at all.  Amanda Ghassaei seems to have perfectly situated herself between being a scientist and artist.  This project illustrates that well.  For it Ghassaei uses a laser to burn grooves into a variety of materials such as wood, acrylic, and paper.  The grooves are about two times larger than they would be on a regular record.  However, these DIY records are still entirely playable.  Check out the video after the jump to see her laser-cut records in action.

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Phenomenal Collage With Minimal Resources


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When Isaac Tobin is not working as a senior designer for University of Chicago Press or playing with type design, then he is whipping up some pretty phenomenal collages with minimal resources. Each piece remind us that cutting back and holding the line is just as important as drawing it. His seemingly simple use of familiar and found paper products matched with sporadic vintage text and condensed doodling presents an accessible everyday charm that inspires affordable creativity.

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Steeped In History: The Costume And Prop Designs Of Petra Storrs

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Londoner Petra Storrs is not just a set, prop, and costume/fashion designer– she’s an artist who collaborates with performers to transcend ideas beyond the ephemeral and into a sturdy cult of fantasy. The “reflective mirror dress” she designed for Paloma Faith, for example, not only sharpens the singer’s playful theatrical identity, but further investigates this concept of “the gaze”. In Dazed and Confused Magazine, Faith elaborates on the intention, “Obviously, as a performer, I am normally the observed, but I wanted to flip that dynamic around and make the audience the focus.” Storrs response, of course, was to whip up a garment that literally does just that.

But it’s not just creative camaraderie that gets Storrs’ juices flowing– she also finds inspiration from everyday objects and history, or everyday objects that hold history such as . . . tea. Camellia & the Rabbit, her latest design endeavor (collected here), involves performance artist Rachel Snider, who uses “tea as a central motif/metaphor” and a narrative “like sea shanties” to interweave “historical facts and stories of tea”– thus, evoking our own personal relationship to this British afternoon tradition.

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