The Luminaria’s Colorful and Inflatable Architecture

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Luminaria by Architects of Air is a touring inflatable structure.  The ‘building’ has made stops internationally since 1992.  Visitors to the Luminaria remove their shoes and enter an air lock.  Once through the airlock visitors are free to roam the structure.  The Luminaria is built of inflated PVC.  Sunlight from outside shines through the various colors of PVC creating an otherworldly glow.  The highly saturated colors coupled with the gently curving walls and floor give the Luminaria a subtle biological nature.  Interestingly one visitor describes the structure as ” Somewhere between a womb and a cathedral.”

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Garth and Pierre’s Geometric Vintage Food

Garth and Pierre are an artistic team based out of Washington state, for their series MENU they appropriated nostalgic imagery of restaurants, kitchens, and table settings to explore the perceptions and politics surrounding food. The artists use geometric shapes cut into the image by hand, leaving the viewer with a lace-like grid of highly graphic saturated colors that allude to a romanticized era that has long since passed.

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Eske Rex’s Drawing Machine

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Its difficult to say whether the drawings or the machine is the work of art here.  Artist Eske Rex created the Drawing Machine which in turn produces ink drawings.  Two pendulums are attached to an arm which is equipped with a ball point pen.  Once the pendulums are set in motion the arms record the contraption’s movement by creating a singular work of art.  Beyond each piece’s pleasing aesthetic is something just as intriguing.  In a way, each drawing documents a very specific movement and time.

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Designer Creates a Different Silhouette of His Daughter Every Week

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Graphic Design can often get the bad rap of lacking soul or substance.  Designer Brent Holloman, however, created a series with heart.  When his daughter was born in 2012 he decided to create a new silhouette of her each week.  Ranging from illustration to sculpture, each week brings a profile of his little girl.  These are a sampling of the many pieces he created.  Holloman comments on the series:

” With the arrival of our first baby girl there is one thing I hear all the time… “They grow up so fast.” So I decided to start a project where I can mark the stages of her growth by doing a silhouette of her each week for her first year (or as long as I can keep it going).”

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Sitting on the Fence with Sven Lamme

Sven Lamme seems to playfully sit on the fence, so to say, between art and design.  In collaboration with landscaper Terra Incognita, Lamme constructed these three “seating elements” throughout a nature preserve in the Netherlands.  They at once serve as kind of landmark for the natural surroundings as well as a means to passively interact with the environment.  Lamme also makes use of visual puns in the design of his seating elements.  The first seat a literal interpretation of sitting on the fence, and the third resembling a buoy – a reference to the lands elevation below sea level.

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Yo Shimada’s Post-It Note Structures

Designer Yo Shimada of the firm Tato Architects built this structure in conjunction with students from the Kyoto University of Art and Design.  The entire wall is made of post-it notes – 30,000 cells of post-it notes.  The brightly colored sticky notes are stuck together to create individual cells which are then stacked.  The installation exemplifies both innovative design and architecture.  Using a simple material, Yo is able to create a relatively large and sturdy artful structure. [via]

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Ilona Gaynor Is Designing A Bank Robbery

 

Ilona Gaynor is a designer and image maker hailing from the UK. Her latest project, Under Black Carpets, leverages bank heists as a medium of design. Through a series of intensive design and research exercises, Gaynor is using the strategies and vocabularies of robbery as a method for storytelling. Perhaps the most bizarre fact about the project is that is actually a collaborative effort with the NYC FBI Department of Justice and the LAPD archival department. Geoff Manaugh puts it well, stating that the project is an investigation into the “use and misuse of the cityscape where by architecture is considered both the obstacle and the tool to bridge or separate you from what you’re looking for” in both legal and illegal agendas. The project, ongoing, is currently comprised of an obsessive collection of materials that range from photographs of bank entrances to scale-models of get away cars. The project truly feels like the work of an insane person… and I mean that in the best way possible.

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James Boock’s Machine Transforms Earthquakes Into Art

Industrial designer James Boock, along with the design team of Josh Newsome-White, Brooke Bowers, Hannah Warren, George Redmond, Richie Stewart and Philippa Shipley designed and built the Quakescape 3D Fabricator.  The fabricator uses earthquake data to visually represent the natural disaster.  The machine retrieves the earth quake data which is then transformed into paint formations.  Different color paint (representing different intensities of an earthquake) are poured onto the appropriate locations of a cross section of Christchurch, New Zealand.  The wet paint flows down mountains, pooling in valleys, further transforming the raw information into art.

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