Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

Andrea Hasler sculpture5 Andrea Hasler sculpture3 consumerism

The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

Libby Black’s Designer Paper Sculptures

Libby Black‘s sculptures are delicately pieced together paper, hot glue, and acrylic paint.  In this way she recreates everyday objects as designer products.  Though Black’s sculptures are constructed with care, each is clearly playful. Rather than use a heavy-handed sarcasm, she seems careful to be at once ironic and earnest, critical and in praise of materialism.  Her sculptures effectively investigate a complex love/hate relationship with a name brand life.

Appropriately, Libby Black’s enviable ‘luxury’ sculptures are featured in the “Seven Deadly Sins” themed Beautiful/Decay Book: 9.  Be sure to check out Black and many other amazing artists, illustrators, designers, and writers also featured in the book.

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Design Month: Flux Chair

 

This chair literally just blew my mind. Excuse me while the popping sounds subside…. It folds flat and according to this description, “Flux Chairs can be stacked 21 chairs high in just one foot of space. For those with space limitations, the Flux Wall Strap makes it easy to store folded chairs against the wall and can hold up to six Flux Chairs at a time.” If you live in a small space, any space really, and love to entertain these chairs seem beyond ideal. They’re amazing!

Design Month: Chen Chen

Chen Chen’s products are at once beautiful and repulsive, which is what I love about them. Imagine serving your guests a frosty beverage on his “Cold Cuts” coasters or arranging your Lilies of the Valley in his “Swell” vase.

Dale Edwin Murray

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Dale Edwin Murray is both a designer & and illustrator, and apparantly a good fellow to know if you’re in the market for an original, playful t-shirt design. (P.S. Anyone want to play “spot the banana”?)

Joe Van Wetering

Joe Van WeteringJoe Van Wetering is a 22 year old designer/illustrator that prides himself as a Chicago native. Right now he works for a little T-shirt company called Threadless, and if you haven’t checked out their tees before, you should probably do so right now. Joe is also damn good at Tetris and if that isn’t your cup of tea, he will take you down in ping-pong. Watch your back.