Roseline de Thélin’s Brilliant Holographic Light Sculptures Shimmer With Ghostly Figures

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Roseline de Thélin, a Spanish artist, creates stunning, larger-than-life holographic light sculptures and installations. Her projects feature what she calls, “Homos Luminosos,” or luminous beings. Using scientific properties of light such as reflection, conduction, refraction and transparency, Roseline creates these transparent, mystical bodies that look like they are hovering in mid-air. These fantastical works are inspired by astronomy, quantum physics, definitions of perception, and other-worldly-creatures.

Thélin uses a wide range of materials including mirrors, wires, chains, fiber optics and quartz crystals in her work. She combines the use of digital technology and exhibition space, as she works on producing these mystical beings by creating illusion and deception effects withing specific sites. The empty spaces between the light points serve to create a loose definition of what real space is. Are we looking at something that truly exists? Or is it just as illusion? Furthermore, is the visibility of the illusion a justification for its existence in the tangible world?

Her latest holographic sculptures, presented in FREQUENCY 2011, the Lincoln Festival of Digital Culture at the Saint Swithin Church in Lincoln, England, are a reflection on life, illusion and the evolution of mankind. This series features a series of these ‘light beings’ that exist in a parallel, timeless dimension.

(via Feather of Me)

You Won’t Believe What You’ll See When You Zoom In On Ferdi Rizkiyanto’s Awe Inspiring Digital Paintings

Ferdi Rizkiyanto

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Ferdi Rizkiyanto creates digital art that speaks volumes to the strength of the medium, utilizing high-definition rendering, texture, light and incredibly minute details to create emotionally narrative scenes from the ordinary. By day, the Jakarta-based Rizkiyanto works in advertising and art directing, creating his own works as exercises in visual storytelling to enhance his skills.

In works like Uncharted (above), Riskiyanto takes a basic object and adds motion to create compelling narratives which actually unfold through the small details. Giving a twist to the classic tale of Icharus, where several wax figures try to reach the bright light of the candle they emerge from, skillfully shown to be melting the closer they get to reaching their goal. Meanwhile, several figures at the base of the candle appear to be boosting up the explorers, as well as vainly attempting to hold the whole eroding structure from toppling. Perhaps this is why the artist fully explores the Lilliputian details in his narratives, because the closer a viewer is drawn into the work, the more they investigate and learn the story of the work. (via mymodernmet)

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David Szauder’s Finds Parallels Between Computer Glitches And Failed Human Memories

Digital Art

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David Szauder, a German digital artist, takes interest in the glitch phenomenon. Failed Memory, the name of the compilation of images, showcases photographs that are purposely altered. Precisely, the photograph’s flow is interrupted by the sudden ambiguity of lines and distortions occurring in certain parts of the subject’s body.

His ‘glitch’ technique literally translates to the themes he is working with here: memory and the possible failure to reconstruct them. Much like the files on our computer’s memory, human recollection of events might get distorted throughout time.

“Our brains store away images to retrieve them later, like files stored away on a hard drive. But when we go back and try to re-access those memories, we may find them to be corrupted in some way.”

His work is more than just visual; Szauder provides text to go along with the images. On his Behance profile, the artist expresses that the images recollect failed memories related to family moments. (via IGNANT)

Quayola Digitally Deconstructs Baroque Masterpieces

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Strata #4 – Site-Specific Installation from Quayola on Vimeo.

Strata #4 is a two channel video by the artist known simply as Quayola.  For the video, Quayola used images of two grand altarpieces by Rubens and Van Dyck.  He worked with an HDR photographer to obtain huge 20,000 by 20,000 pixel images of the work.  Then using unbelievable computing power and algorithms Quayloa investigates each masterpiece’s underlying structure, composition, and color.  Strata #4 at turn resembles 20th century abstract renditions of the baroque work.  Yet his video squarely part of a New Aesthetic, part of a 21st century sensibility.

Abstract “Paintings” Created By Computer Algorithms

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Perhaps in the strictest sense, these abstract pieces by artist Siebren Versteeg aren’t paintings (or maybe in any sense they are not really paintings).  However, they do say quite a bit about painting and creativity.  Versteeg created code that utilizes a complex set of algorithms to create these pieces.  The work is then often printed on to paper or canvas.  Versteeg observes patterns, tendencies, styles in abstract expressionist painting and uses these as the basis for the code that create these “paintings”.  His programmed algorithms work with variable qualities such as viscosity, color, drips, and so on.  The program then “decides” how to use and combine these variable in several layers to create a complete composition.  In a way, the art is in the code Versteeg creates – the paintings merely a visual manifestation of that code.

Suellen Parker Digitally Remasters Clay Sculptures With Fragments Of Photography

 

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Suellen Parker builds each character from unforgettable moments of strangers or friends. First, she starts with sculpting the shape from plastiline clay before photographing it with a blank backdrop. Then, simultaneously, she scavengers for props, walls, or environments that might suit a certain character well and shoots those too. All of these images are finally loaded into a computer, where the art of merging and manipulation occurs. Skin tones are “digitally painted” and human faces technologically blend with clay while backgrounds stitch together to create a new imaginative world.

Of Letting Go, her most recent series collected here, Parker strives to twist not only mediums, but also gender roles. She suggests her characters concretely and conceptually have a fine blend of both, and states, they “are attempting to find a sacred space, a place of vulnerability, a place where they allow themselves to be really seen. By quieting one’s life, even momentarily, an opportunity is presented to learn truths about oneself. By engaging in private play, one is able to let go of expectations and rules. The result is a private and truthful moment that may be enjoyed without fear of judgment or consequence.”

Jon Rafman’s New Age Demanded


Montreal-based artist Jon Rafman‘s series New Age Demanded is dominated by a distorted, bodiless figure made from textures and skin taken from paintings by artists – such as Gerhard Richter and Franz Kline – and made anew. With the aid of photoshop, Rafman collages numerous different elements onto the deformed classical bust and its background to mix old with new, high art with low art, and craft with technology. More after the jump.