Dominic Wilcox And Four Other Artists Upcycle and Illuminate Found Objects

Dominic Wilcox

Dominic Wilcox

Sarah Frost

Sarah Frost

Gabriel Dishaw

Gabriel Dishaw

Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford

Through the metamorphic conversion of discarded paraphernalia given a second life, art created from materials otherwise destined for a landfill has turned waste into resource. In a conscious reflection of a recycled object’s inherent value as a cultural statement, the fragmented disarray of salvaged goods conjoin as a reflection on the surplus of consumerism. Computer relics and plastic toys from the 1990’s resurface as jarring, three-dimensional works that reestablish a value beyond their initial introduction as cultural commodities. Extending the life of goods long since forgotten, the immortalization of a wastefulness that continues to swell stands as not only a poignant reminder of the ecological decay resulting from our consumption, but the opportunity to revisit and remake otherwise quotidian, superfluous goods.

Working predominately, if not entirely, with upcycled goods, the following artists create stunning installation and sculptural works that are a visual whirlpool of texture, color and line.

Featured artists include Dominic Wilcox, Sarah Frost, Robert Bradford, Gabriel Dishaw and Elisabeth Higgins O’Conner.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Creative 3D Sculpted Alphabet Made From Food, Body Parts And Other Everyday Objects

FOREAL-Design-Typography-1 FOREAL-Design-Typography-2 FOREAL-Design-Typography-3 FOREAL-Design-Typography-4

German design studio FOREAL has created an impeccable set of 3D alphabet renderings for their personal project “Sculpted Alphabet”. Playful series features the whole English alphabet made from various everyday objects, food products and even body parts. The whole set of 26 letters was created by two designers, Benjamin Simon and Dirk Schuster.

“New tools, new playgrounds. One single rule: Choose a letter and sculpt it! Maxon gave us it’s new sculpting tools with the last releases of Cinema 4D. Our goal was to create the whole alphabet and achieve some completely new ways how type can be built and seen. A playful execution of that self-initiated project helped us to gain some significant experience in cgi sculpting techniques while having a lot of fun. We hope you enjoy these as we did.”

The project by FOREAL is a candid illustration of how three-dimensional CGI (computer-generated imagery) has moved forward and continues to grow in capabilities. The artistic 3D alphabet was designed using one of the agency’s illustration tools, Maxon Cinema 4D. According to the producers, it is one of the greatest tools for recreating even the slightest details, such as hair or fur.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Surreal And Unnerving Photo Manipulations Question The Nature Of Reality

digital-art-photoshop-martin-de-pasquale-4
digital-art-photoshop-martin-de-pasquale-3
8ef511effac3fe9bdf5952cb6c73c502
105a141a373acf99abad22127e66c02d

For his surreal photo manipulations, the Buenos Aires-based digital artist Martin De Pasquale contorts his own body to imbue the mundane rituals of daily life with a sense of humor that sometimes veers into the realm of terror. With the wonderfully oxymoronic title “Impossible Photography,” De Pasquale’s work stretches the medium to its limit, boldly questioning our assumption that the photographic object necessarily reflects reality. Though indeed impossible, the strange and comical mishaps— and horrors— of the work speak to very real existential anxieties.

Here, the human body emerges as mechanical, much like the the camera itself. Like the gears of an advanced automaton, heads and faces are replaced with ease, and the treat of mortality is abated with ever-renewed body parts. In some ways, the impossible photographs recall the paradox of the Ship of Theseus, a thought experiment which asks if a ship remains essentially the same after each of its parts are replaced. Here, the ship becomes a human being; in the daily grind of life, our protagonist is continually deconstructed and reassembled. Does he become generic, or does he hold fast to his identity?

In so questioning the individual, De Pasquale’s imaginative images challenge the notion of replication, which in turn examines the very nature of the photograph. Seen here many times over, the self is given over to a mysterious—and frightening— sort of duplication, giving rise to unnatural yet indistinguishable bodies that are ultimately mere simulacrums of the original. Take a look. (via Demilked)

Currently Trending

Intricate Digital “Fabergé Fractals” By Tom Beddard Look So Real You Can Almost Grab Them

beddard7 beddard8 beddard4

Fractals are a geometric concept and mathematical set that represent repeating patterns, also known as self-similarity. Scotland-based physicist and artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue, who we have previously featured for his generative graphic work, has recently been creating 3D geometric fractal designs that he refers to as “Fabergé Fractals” because of the detailed and ornate patterns that are rendered by the artist’s formulaic methods. At first glance, Beddard’s designs appear to be fully realized, physical forms due to the intricacies of the patterns and the technical skill that is applied to each generation.

Beddard explains, “The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.

“The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation.” (via my modern met)

Currently Trending

Pawel Nolbert’sTypeface Created With Dripping Wet Paint Strokes Will Remind You Of The Beauty Of Language

letter-1
letter-2
letter-3
letter-4

For his breathtaking project “Atypical,” the Warsaw, Poland-based illustrator and graphic designer Pawel Nolbert creates a typeface unlike any other. Composed of globular, thick brushstrokes saturated with dense color, his letters take on a tangible and material form, becoming what he calls “half-realistic, half-illustrative figurative sculptures.” For the series, the artist, who is also an art director, photographed paint splatters, and he later enhanced them and added depth through digital manipulation.

What emerges from Nolbert’s compelling work is a refreshing and visceral take on the written word, which in our contemporary culture can seem stale and lifeless. Here, language becomes physical as the body, writhing and twisting with vivid pleasure. The two dimensions of the page become the three, with thick, textured lines overlapping and creating an unexpected depth of field. Displaying an impressive grasp on color theory, the artist uses cognitive and perceptual tricks to extend the letters and numbers into three dimensionality. Complimentary colors are layered atop one another, creating an engaging visual dynamic: orange is paired with blue, purple with yellow, and green with red.

In a cultural landscape in which we are constantly bombarded with images, language moves to the wayside, and yet Nolbert finds a way to reclaim our attentions and bring us back to the fundamentals of words, letters, and numerals. Dancing about and leaping from the page, spewing paint in unexpected directions, his “Atypical” posters remind us of the vitality and creative potential inherent in verbal expression. Take a look. (via Colossal)

Currently Trending

Collaboration Between Artist And Photographer Yields A New Brand Of “Digitally Handcrafted” Images

cinaklukas-press1 cinaklukas-press2

ck-3

Michael Cina has created a world-renowned career by fusing elements of both design and art into a signature style of technically-sound, visually striking, and uniquely glossy works. This approach has brought massive clients ranging from Facebook to Coca-Cola to MTV, as well as fine-art success. His latest efforts involved opening up control of his personal practice, however, as Cina worked side-by-side, though miles away, with a collaborator. For over a year, Cina and New York-based photographer John Klukas worked together to create a new body of work, which they began to call “digitally handmade” – a true synthesis of each creator’s respective styles. This collaboration yielded some twenty works, which are collected in the exhibition, She Who Saw Deep, at Minneapolis’ Public Functionary.

Beginning their complicated collaborative process with photos of the exhibition’s singular muse in Klukas’ New York studio, Cina then took the images and digitally overlaid his handmade paintings in his Minneapolis studio. Working the files back and forth between the two several times, the finished files were often so large and dense that they were as large as 16GB. These pieces were then printed and mounted, where Cina made final edits by hand – embellishing, spraying, drawing, and painting each piece to give them their own unique finish.

The digitally handcrafted images in She Who Saw Deep are then titled around the loose parallel of the Epic of Gilgamesh, “where the hero passes through the absolute darkness of grief, fear and death to be reborn into the light…the resulting works in this exhibit are both a visual and conceptual interpretation of this classic and universal human story.” Public Functionary, which offered support for the printing and creation of the works, is offering unique, limited-edition prints of these collaborative works, which can be purchased here.

She Who Saw Deep is currently on view now through July 13th at Public Functionary in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. 

Currently Trending

This Is What People Would Look Like If They Were Shredded Into Thin Lines

itochurch6

itochurch10

itochurch9

itochurch3

“Scribbled Line People” is a digital collaboration between New York-based illustrator Ayaka Ito and programmer Randy Church. Part of a “3D Motion and Particle” course, the two decided to embark on this project after discussing how to create an interface that could incorporate 3D scribbled lines into photography. Mutually inspired by Rachel Ducker’s wire sculptures and Erik Natzke’s Flash paintings, the duo uses both Flash and Photoshop to reconfigure photographic subjects into shredded images that are gracefully incorporated into their background compositions. Ito says, “Our objective in approaching the visual, was to create a series of answers to show how scribbled lines could develop normal portraits into abstract art.” (via the creator’s project)

Currently Trending

4-Inch Point Of View: Stunning Landscapes From Around The World Captured With An iPhone 

SamAlive-Photography-1 SamAlive-Photography-2SamAlive-Photography-3SamAlive-Photography-4

Sam Alive is a New York city-based photographer who has truly aced the digital lens of an iPhone. His project “Through the Phone” features stunning landscapes, urban cityscapes and natural sceneries all captured with a mobile camera.

The key to Sam’s work is the juxtaposition between the sharp and detailed view presented on the mobile screen and the blurry unrecognizable background behind it. To mock the late influx of smartphones in our lives, artist takes these wide breathtaking vistas of sea shores, valleys and skyscrapers, and crams them into a tiny 4-inch display. Thus, limiting the viewer’s vision and making a good point about the change in our perception.

“Life is like an adventure, because you never know what is going to happen next; you only have one life, all we can do until we die is live everyday to the best of our ability. As long as I am still alive, I will continue to take pictures everyday of my life.”

Sam started his project “Through the Phone” two years ago and already had a chance to travel and take photographs all over Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, San Francisco and New York. In his Tumblr blog, he promises to keep on traveling and updating his project with more captivating shots through the phone. (via designboom)

Currently Trending