Fabrican- Science And Fashion Blend Together In incredible Spray On Fabric

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Joining 3D printing and digital textile printing, the idea of a sprayable, wearable and fabric has the inventors of Fabrican LTD imaging the possibilities which go beyond its initial usage in the fashion industry. Fabrican’s ‘Euraka!’ moment came from another famous canned sprayable, Silly String. The science of the process involves the creation of a liquid suspension which is then applied using a spray gun or aerosol canister. The resulting sprayed fabric has natural, synthetic and recycled fiber options, and when applied typically feels like a breathable suede.

Practical applications have ranged past fashion shows into automobile interiors, furniture upholstery and even entire rooms (the material is easily washable). The fabric can be embedded with a variety of supplements and additives which make separate colors, patterns and   (which also opens up the possibilities of quick-creating medical applications such as casts, bandages and even antiseptic-wound cleansing).

According to Fabrican-inventor, Spanish fashion designer Manel Torres, “As a non-woven material, Spray-on Fabric offers possibilities for binding, lining, repairing, layering, covering and moulding in ways previously not imaginable.”

Watch a slightly NSFW video of Fabrican LTD in action after the jump!

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Rosanna Jones’ Overpainted-Photoseries ‘Skins’

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The photoseries Skins by British photographer Rosanna Jones has all the necessary elements of alluring art; a distinctive and unique perspective, inventive technique and haunting imagery. Describing herself as a fashion and portraiture photographer, as well as a mixed media artist, Jones currently studies photography at Falmouth University in Cornwall, UK. Created as part of her Final Major Project, Jones began the series investigating how the face many of us present publicly ends up being the front which conceals our true nature from ourselves. This perspective is particularly poignant for a fashion photographer, who no doubt has seen firsthand an industry which is quite openly based on hiding and disguising imperfections. Says Jones, “…my theme was Concealment - looking at concealing ourselves until we’re no longer recognisable.”

Jones’ work was also inspired by another photographer known for obscuring the human form, Rik Garrett and his Symbiosis series. Garrett explains his artistic goal in the over-painted photos as “erasing the boundaries of the human body. By applying paint directly to the surface of photographs, I have actualized an impossible dream…” a process that when paralleled to Jones’ Skin series creates a unique bond between the two photoseries.

Jones is intentionally vague on the specifics of how the over-painted and (possibly) collaged images are created, which only adds more allure to the shrouded and obscured works. Says Jones, “A few people were confused when seeing them in real life about what they literally were – the more mystery the better I say – but they’re digital photo collages which are then overpainted”, giving each work both emotive beauty and metaphorical weight rarely seen in conventional fashion photography.

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Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

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The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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Fashion Photographs Show Human Anatomy Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

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The work of Koen Hauser floats somewhere between fine art and fashion photography.  His series Modische Atlas der Anatomie illustrates this well.  The series’ title is a kind play on words – literally it translates as “Fashionable Anatomy Atlas”, yet with a single vowel change it can be translated as “Medical Anatomy Atlas”.  In the series, his subject seem to be modeling her organs as much as her clothes.  Portions of the model’s body are cut away to reveal her inner workings.  However, rather than depict the organs true to life, Hauser referenced traditional anatomy atlas’ – artistic medical reference works.

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Steeped In History: The Costume And Prop Designs Of Petra Storrs

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Londoner Petra Storrs is not just a set, prop, and costume/fashion designer– she’s an artist who collaborates with performers to transcend ideas beyond the ephemeral and into a sturdy cult of fantasy. The “reflective mirror dress” she designed for Paloma Faith, for example, not only sharpens the singer’s playful theatrical identity, but further investigates this concept of “the gaze”. In Dazed and Confused Magazine, Faith elaborates on the intention, “Obviously, as a performer, I am normally the observed, but I wanted to flip that dynamic around and make the audience the focus.” Storrs response, of course, was to whip up a garment that literally does just that.

But it’s not just creative camaraderie that gets Storrs’ juices flowing– she also finds inspiration from everyday objects and history, or everyday objects that hold history such as . . . tea. Camellia & the Rabbit, her latest design endeavor (collected here), involves performance artist Rachel Snider, who uses “tea as a central motif/metaphor” and a narrative “like sea shanties” to interweave “historical facts and stories of tea”– thus, evoking our own personal relationship to this British afternoon tradition.

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Yoko Ono’s Make-up Tips For Men

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Yoko Ono needs no introduction. She is a well established art superstar and one of my personal favorites. Ono has a new video called “Make-Up Tips for Men” (made as part of her clothing line for Opening Ceremony). Over “uh-huh”s and a club beat, men are given commands like, “When you see a rainbow in the sky. Breathe it in,” or “Let everything in your room shine and sparkle.” Grooming be damned! (via)

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Photographing The Sweet Lolitas By Damon Casarez

Damon Casarez is a Los Angeles based photographer raised in suburban Diamond Bar, CA. In his recent series “Sweet Lolita”, Casarez covered the Dollyhouse Runway a “Lolita” based fashion show for Southern California Lolita fashion designers. His images give us a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes of this fashion subculture.

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Enrico Nagel’s Flower-Headed Models

Enrico Nagel‘s Secret Garden is a series of collage portraits.  High fashion models are contrasted against a plain paperboard background.  Each model’s face is replaced with a garish arrangement of flowers, jewels, and other ephemera.  Nagel juxtaposes what he terms as the “artificial imagery” of the fashion world with the natural imagery of flowers.  Each bloom seems like a nearly violent coup of the subject’s identity, the clothing being the only remnant of the former glossy fashion mag photo.

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