Performance Art Collective Uses Goldfish Movements To Create Music

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Quintetto from Quiet ensemble on Vimeo.

The artist collective Quiet Ensemble are skilled at making the mundane feel monumental, or at least worth noting. Their installation/ performance art Quintetto is naturally composed of a quintet of goldfish.  The little fish may not realize it, but their movements are of consequence.  Placed in tall tanks, the vertical movements of the fish are monitored and converted into sound.  Each fish is assigned a separate tank.  The installation seems to give some sort of order to the random, and in a strange way lend gravity to something that is trivial.  Check out the video to see the fish in action in full performance art glory!

Real Fish Heads Used In Photographs To Satirize Everyday Human Life



Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard places real fish from her fish monger on doll parts to recreate, amuse, and in a way, criticize/satirize aspects of human society.

Of her work, Dr. Didier Rouzeyrol poeticizes:

The fish of acbe do not look at the ground.
They play there. They play. They play with us.
They place us into these pieces.
Parts in an act, in a photograph.

European bred and born, Becker-Echivard could easily be a character in a Julie Delpy film– charmingly dedicated to absurd yet accessible content with an undeniably curious or obsessive edge. For instance, after the setting and shooting is done, this Parisian artist tops off each project by eating it for dinner, stating, “It is the perfect recycling of art. Nothing is left over – and I can live from it.”

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Unbelievably Realistic ‘Painted’ Fish By Keng Lye

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It may surprise you to know that these are not real animals – they’re probably most accurately called paintings.  Artist Keng Lye brings these aquatic creatures to life by creating layers of resin and alternating them with acrylic paint.  Coupled with his expert play of perspective, the fish (and other creatures) seem ultra realistic.  Keng Lye has since added three dimensional portions to his ‘paintings’ as can be seen in these first four images, making them seem even more unbelievably alive and real.   [via]