Classical Figures In Tucked And Pinched Foam

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These headless figures resemble ancient Venus statuettes.  However, the sculptures’ construction betray their modern origin.  Artist Etienne Gros pulls, tucks, and pins foam to resemble the classic nude.  The full curves and folds of the foam mimic human flesh in strangely similar manner.  Gros contrasts the age-old form with modern industrial material to highlight concerns that have never disappeared – the body, sensuality and sex.  Gros is familiar with the human figure beyond this unique medium. He’s explored themes of the classical figure in paint and even smoke.

A Human Ant-Farm by Snarkitecture

The architecture and Art team Snarkitecture have been in the art news lately for their installation at the entrance of the Design Miami Pavilion 2012.  Dig is an earlier installation from the team featured here.  Often  mixing elements of architecture  design, art, and performance, Dig was at once an installation and a performance.

The team filled the Storefront for Art and Architecture with solid architectural foam.  The artists then excavated a network of tunnels through the foam and inhabited them for the following month.  The performance was an artful investigation of contemporary architecture based on excavating rather than building, as well as building for necessity.

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Michel Blazy’s Massive Installations Made Out Of Detergent Foam

The installations of Michel Blazy grow, flow, and froth.  Like much of his work, Blazy’s latest installation, titled Bouquet Final, makes use of white foam.  Inside a French Medieval church, the foam tumbles from high scaffolding to the floor.  The pliable, moving, and ever changing foam contrasts with the sense of permanence in the centuries old cathedral.  Blazy alludes to a change and mortality by using materials such as foam, an unstable medium in perpetual transformation.  The foamy flow could also reference the earth and neglect for its environment.  The installation resembles uncontrollable detergent suds – a product that is at once used to clean our homes and also a poisonous pollutant to the earth and its waters.

Lauren Hillebrandt

Dutch-born Lauren Hillebrandt‘s photographs objects and reframes them in other-worldy, digitally-made landscapes. Her latest series, Flat Landscapes, presents various ordinary objects surrounded by bright panels of color to subvert the norms of still-life art, and recently won Foam Magazine‘s still life contest.

More photography from this series and some of her earlier work is shown below.