Antoine Bruy Documents Europeans Who Traded Comforts Of Modern World To Living Secluded In The Wilderness

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In his project “Scrublands”, French photographer Antoine Bruy pulls down the curtain on the mysterious back-to-the-land movement and its members. His series documents the lives of several communities who isolated themselves from the civilized world and have been living in the wilderness for more than 20 years now.

In 2010, Bruy embarked on a hitchhiking journey across Europe. With no specific destination in mind he wandered from one place to another hoping to find those secluded communities of people who abandoned their modern lifestyle, freed themselves from social constraints and chose to live in the wilderness. He would spend days and weeks together with them, helping in everyday chores and taking photographs of their daily routines.

Photographer notices that despite different locations and professional backgrounds (from philosophy teachers to engineers), these communities and their members are all linked to each other through handmade buildings and agriculture-based living. Bruy has plans to continue his project next year by exploring the United States. (via featureshoot)

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Bina Baitel’s Hybrid Furniture


Bina Baitel
 is a French product designer whose takes previously distinct pieces of furniture–futons, stools, lamps– and combines them to make some wild looking objects. Like most great product design, they look more like sculptures than they do products. We could all probably use some more melting lamps in our lives. (via)

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Laurent Monnet’s Mind-Bending Digital Illustration

 

We’re not in Kansas anymore. French artist Laurent Monnet creates warped digital illustrations that decompose the figure into flat applications of mind-bending shape and texture. It’s clear that Monnet, a student of the traditional arts by day, let’s himself go wild with these. I like how they simultaneously recede and melt while bouncing away from their muted backgrounds in sharp contrast. Definitely interested to see what this guys continues to do going forward.

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ESTUAIRE: Amazing Installation Show Along the Loire River in Western France

There is a lot of public art on view in Nantes, France right now. Amazing installation pieces have sprouted all over the city, an industrial port off the Loire river near the Atlantic coast, as part of a couple large exhibitions happening all at once. One of these exhibits (and possibly the best of all currently on view), is ESTUAIRE, a trail of installation pieces in and along the Loire near Nantes and Saint Nazaire that celebrates and plays off of river habitats. This is the third year the show has been organized (2007 and 2009, previously). A few of the sculptures include beached boats, partially submersed homes, bears in trees, and monstrous sea snake skeletons, providing for a really strong, visually appealing commentary on the state of our natural environments. Check out more of ESTUAIRE 2012 after the jump.

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Olivier Garraud Creates an installation with rotting food, maggots, and flies

 

French artist Olivier Garraud has created Second Life, an installation that encapsulates the life cycle of flies in real time. The piece consists of two parts: an apparatus that allows flies access to food, and a tube filled with maggots and flies connected to an amplifier. Second Life allows us to examine the relatively short life-span of an insect on concise, bare bones terms, generating a context which can be applied to personal events. More images after the jump, and you can also check out a video of the installation in action here.

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Challenging Architectural Installation from the Festival Des Architectures Vives

 

The Festival Des Architectures Vives, of Montpellier in Southern France, is an annual exhibition showcasing new talent in architectural installation. The Festival is currently in its 7th year. Here are a few images of some of the stuff that’s gone down. Repetition seems to be a popular theme this year, as many of the installations involved in the event feature identical or similar elements multiplied a few times over. The small alcove spaces that contain each piece work really well. They restrict the work just enough to create a slight amount of tension, but don’t distract from or impede any of the installations. See more from the show after the jump. (via)

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Le Nid: Large Bird-Shaped Bar From Jean Jullien

 

Originally from France, graphic designer Jean Julien lives in London. Julien designed “Le Nid”, a bar in the shape of a bird, which stretches 40 meters and sits on the top floor at the Tour de Bretagne in Nantes, France. It’s clear that lots of thought went into this detailed project. The bird’s eyes blink, and chairs are shaped as eggs. (via)

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Basketball Hoops Designed To Look Like Trees By a/LTA

Drawing inspiration from our oxygen-producing friends the trees, French architecture firm a/LTA created this basketball hoop. You can say a lot about the piece (which I guess is kinda functional) that may or may not be on point (“beautifying our public space so that our communities can grow and be healthy“), but mostly it’s just really cool. (via)

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