Nøne Futbol Club’s Humorous And Subversive Sculptures And Installations

Nøne Futbol Club installation10 Nøne Futbol Clubinstallation1

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Nøne Futbol Club is a duo of Paris based artists.  They work in a wide variety of mediums and forms from video to installation.  However, nearly all of their work seems to be tied together by a certain mischievous sense of humor.  Though not always overtly political, the duo’s art is definitely subversive.  For example, consider Lift a Finger, the first piece pictured here.  The maneki-neko, usually a statuette of a welcoming or beckoning cat suddenly becomes hostile with a simple change of hand gesture.  The pharase “KEEP WARM BURNOUT THE RICH”  is turned into a branding iron.  The implement not only burns, but more importantly is a tool for displaying and designating ownership.

Nicolas Rosette goes onto describe the duo’s practice saying:

“Nøne Futbol Club is a duo that is capable of mobilizing as many accomplices as necessary to make their works and performances.
The playful component is inseparable from their creative process which tackles the world like a playground for the expression of an art whose nature has continually bordered on the cellophane of the white cube and the great palaces must take the risk of being a mass distribution product. The recursive principle in their work is reversal. It is not about diverting elements from pop culture(or popular culture, the term changing depending on whether this culture comes to us from one side or the other of the Atlantic Ocean) but of a reversal whose final address is always popular culture. A double inversion, whose process of revelation reflects back to us as in a mirror the possible destiny of an art world which has become less subtle than the current popular media cultures; whose practices of critical and jubilatory diversions are the foundation. Would the Nøne Futbol Club be applying to contemporary art what digital cultures have subjected Chuck Norris, the pope and Darth Vader to?”

Hilarious Letterpress Notes

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These letterpress cards are the product of a collaboration between Sapling Press and the Dear Blank, Please Blank project.  Dear Blank, Please Blank is a site which asks visitors to write short “letters” written in a  dear…, please…, sincerely, … style.  The letters on site range from humorous to sarcastic to bitter.  Several of the succinct witty letters have been put to letterpress Sapling Press resembling notes typed on vintage typewriters.  Here is a selection of some of Sapling’s and DBPB’s hilarious offerings.

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OakOak Playing With the City

According to his website, the street artist OakOak “is a French artist who likes to play with urban elements”.  Using simple means and materials, OakOak undermines his neighborhood with playful results.  He uses a minimal amount of actual original artwork, instead re-purposing signs, facades, cement blocks, chipping paint, and more.  OakOak transforms a neighborhood’s imperfections into its own adornments.  He says of his interventions:

“The less I intervene on the wall or the road, the better, especially if I can totally change the sense of the urban environment” [via]

Ralph Pugay’s Hilarious Flat Paintings

 

Ralph Pugay‘ is a Portland artist who makes awesome, lighthearted paintings. His colors and content is all comic, but his style reminds me of a combination of Waldo and Pieter Bruegel–a million things going on with lots of different characters all in one big flattened space. One of the thing i love about this, Waldo, and Pieter, is that you can spend a whole afternoon staring at and finding new, funny things in them. Confused hunters, dancing office workers, spiritual gymnasts; I can’t get enough. Check out the rest after the jump, then go look at the other 42 on his website!

Hunter Payne’s Prolific Brain Material

 

I love Hunter Payne. His work takes me back to a simple time without being simple. Out of all the shakey hand intimate portraits that are currently sieging the art world,  these creations that float through the crazy artist’s brain are by far the most enjoyable because of their lack of pretense.  Hunter’s humble nature and childlike wonder bring questions forth about the necessity for seriousness in art. More after the jump.

JASON RUSNOCK

New Jersey/Philadelphia-based photographer Jason Rusnock has just that right mix of humor, beauty, simplicity, and charm to ensure that his pragmatic shots won’t go unremembered. In an age of photography that falls so heavily upon who has the best chops at Photoshop, or who has the most money to buy this 200-megapixel monster, Rusnock hunkers down with his 35mm rolls and rocks out on formal arrangements and the intrigues of everyday life. In the post below, I’ve done my best to retain the notion of relational precision he hunts after daily, but for a better sense of his arrangements, see here and more generally here. He doesn’t just stop at photos, oh no, he can make a mean video, drawing, sound, or sculpture, and one of his latest series explores the medium of sequential art (no doubt stemming from his love of comics). Rock on.

Cyriak Harris

Cyriak Harris is an artist living in Brighton. He makes splendid videos that remind me of the sensation of sugar on my tongue. I feel the urge to push and push, but each video tells me to sit down and understand that “everything is going to be okay.”

Logan Fleming

Bruce Springsteen, 5'10"

Bruce Springsteen, 5'10"

I recently came upon this online listing for an auction of wax figures which took place at the Hollywood Wax Museum on May 15. Most of the sculptures were apparently made by a man named Logan Fleming (who there is very little information about online). Now I must admit I’ve never been to a wax museum, but I was stunned at how downright awful some of these are. Figures have poor wardrobe selection, weird unnatural skin tones, oddly disproportional body parts, and/or just don’t really look anything like who they’re supposed to. The result is often hilarious, and if it were Mr. Fleming’s intention to make these look so strange (which I’m fairly sure it wasn’t), I could easily see them being presented as works of art. Some of my favorites are after the jump, but please look at the link…there are many more than I could ever put on this blog.