Jiang Pengyi’s Arresting Glow-In-The Dark Works

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Jiang Pengyi‘s latest series, Everything Illuminates, sees the artist mixing fluorescent powders with liquid wax, and applying it to various, commonly-found objects. Pengyi then documents these applications, capturing in a time a brief moments where the objects were not just illuminated, but focused on for consideration through art. According to the Hunan-Province-born artist’s statement, these images “suggest the artist’s changing focus back to original form and shape, at the same time reflect his current state of mind.” 

Pengyi was recently selected to participate in Artshare.com’s group showing of note-worthy Chinese artists born between 1977 and 1987, called Another Light. The show’s catalogue references the artist’s past works, which focused on the rapidly-evolving city and industrial spaces in China, and a slowing down in focus for his newer works, where each object becomes precious and unique. “In Jiang’s Everything Illuminates series, the mystique of autonomous objects is revealed in delicate depiction…Through the passage of time, these objects slowly take on their new forms on film and emit individual signals from their uncommon glow, as they emerge in a bewitching existence.” (via skumar and mymodernmet)

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Taxidermy And Furniture Blend As Disturbing Comment On Consumer Culture

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Designer Armin Blasbichler‘s work is often jarring.  His series ORSON, I’m Home strikes a special chord, though.  The series is composed of three “dining sculptures” created primarily from the bodies of various farm animals.  While we may be more accustomed to farm animals adorning plates on the furniture, seeing them as taxidermy furniture makes for a surreal juxtaposition.  The furniture confronts its users with the consumption it usually facilitates.  Interestingly, for the series Blasbichler features a quote from professor and writer Don Slater: “In talking of modern society as a consumer culture, people are not referring simply to a particular pattern of needs and objects […] but to a culture of consumption.”
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Michael Coffey’s Furniture Is Fundamentally Functional Sculpture

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“I started as a furniture-maker, but eventually felt limited by conventional notions about what furniture was supposed to look like and how it should be built. I now approach my work fundamentally as sculpture, but likewise have resisted passing over the line into pure or nonfunctional form.” – Michael Coffey

According to Michael Coffey, design is not just about art. It’s also a form of “problem solving.” He sees commissions as creative collaboration– loving most when patrons desire something entirely new, more different than his previous work.

As far as process is concerned, Coffey begins with a small wooden model, then develops a design on paper with set dimensions. First cuts generally begin with the buzz of a chainsaw, followed by the use of smaller, more refined, cutters and discs. Part of the fun is figuring out which tools will service the work best.  Click on the video after the jump to see more of his work and philosophy.

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Bae Sehwa’s Beautifully Bent Furniture

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Bae Sehwa’s steamed bentwood furniture ripples in airy and sinewy ways to curve around the human body. The precision in each piece is not accidental. It’s acutely planned. Sehwa digitally renders and manipulates geometric forms then returns to the actual physical form, steaming and bending the wood into a mold under a tight watch. The result is functional, organically smooth, and flawless.

According to R Gallery, “Bae Sehwa’s work is derived from the Korean concept of baesanimsu, meaning the back of the mountain and front of the water and he draws heavily from the profound connection to nature in traditional Korean theories of divination. The steam bent wooden frame of this lounge offers a narrative that includes both the tranquil, meditative qualities of flowing water and the strong, comforting silhouette of a mountain.” Read More >

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HelloMe’s Critical Objects Blur The Line Between Art And Furniture

Critical Objects is a personal initiative of Berlin-based graphic design firm, HelloMe. The project began as a series of explorations that thrive on not having any particular goal. The project consists of a series of objects that transcend a blurry line between artistic sculpture and functional furniture. The beauty of the project is that it remains unknown to the user if these things should really every be used, touched, sat on, or turned on… We have a small collection featured here, so be sure to check out the full series at Critical Objects. Read More >

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Cao Hui’s Flesh CoveredFurniture Complete with Guts And Inards

Cao Hui‘s ultra realistic sculptures manage to be intriguing while stomach turning.  Cao sculpts every day objects such as furniture or clothing as if from butchered flesh and innards.  His strict attention to detail can be seen from the entrails spilling out of a slashed cushion to a couple swollen armrest stitches.  Though constructed from resin, his artwork appears to bulge, droop, and tear much like actual flesh.  Cao juxtaposes inside and outside, essence and appearance in a very literal (albeit gory) manner.  While disturbing, Cao effectively executes his work with a certain dark humor. [via]

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Eric Johnson’s Reclaimed Furniture Design

Eric Johnson is a brilliant carpenter who designs and builds furniture out of completely salvaged materials. Armchairs from boat masts, rocking chairs from milk crates, lamps from moped scraps. A lot of “recycled” product design can end up looking not too different from the garbage it started out as, but Johnson does an incredible job of using clean, shrewd designs to make objects that stand on their own regardless of their history. The combination of his intelligent designs and recycled materials is inspiring in its own right too, quietly encouraging us all to see the potential in the mountains of discarded objects that overwhelm our modern lives. So kudos on three levels, Eric. Keep your eyes on Mr. Johnson, I smell a bright future.

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Tom Price’s Melted Plastic Concept Furniture and Sculpture

 

 

Tom Price melts a lot of plastic in his work. He bends the distinctly man-made material to his specifications, creating highly conceptual chairs, tables, trees, and other objects. It’s easy to see which aspects of Price’s sculptures are the result of his molten process, and some element of intense heat and power lingers long after required cooling periods. You can almost feel the plastics melting in your hands, and smell the awful scent of burning tar. Such lingering power is what makes these works so intriguing. They’re also beautiful, but who’s counting? (via) Read More >

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