The Carved Photographs Of Michel Lamoller Reveal What Lies Beneath

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In his series “tautochronos”, German artist Michel Lamoller takes multiple photographs of the same place at different times, then prints and layers them, physically carving them into one image, sculpting two-dimensional space into three-dimensions. By then photographing the transformed image Lamoller returns the work to two-dimensions, playing with space and volume, echoing the compression of time and place in his work. The deconstructed figures in the resulting photographs are a visual reminder that people are always changing and never fully revealed.

People often speak of ghosts, and that’s what these photographs bring to mind—the pieces left behind when time passes and things change. It’s almost archeological, the parts covered, the parts revealed. The remains remain, an artifact of time passed.

The photos that are mainly figural express the changes in an individual over time. Clothed, naked. Smiling, serious. Button-down, t-shirt. They are a literal portrait of days.

The images that integrate a figure into the environment are more evocative. In one image, a woman seems to be decomposing, dissolving into grass and trees. Another figure blends into a brick building, almost indecipherable. One person’s body seems to be fossilizing as cobblestones stretch up his legs like moss. A book-lined wall is interrupted by fragmented pieces of a man’s face. Are the pieces so small because the impact of the person in the space was so inconsequential?

The word tautochronos is made of two Greek parts: tauto from the combining form meaning same, chronos meaning time. In combining different moments in the same place Lamoller has stopped time. Read More >


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David Szauder’s Finds Parallels Between Computer Glitches And Failed Human Memories

Digital Art

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David Szauder, a German digital artist, takes interest in the glitch phenomenon. Failed Memory, the name of the compilation of images, showcases photographs that are purposely altered. Precisely, the photograph’s flow is interrupted by the sudden ambiguity of lines and distortions occurring in certain parts of the subject’s body.

His ‘glitch’ technique literally translates to the themes he is working with here: memory and the possible failure to reconstruct them. Much like the files on our computer’s memory, human recollection of events might get distorted throughout time.

“Our brains store away images to retrieve them later, like files stored away on a hard drive. But when we go back and try to re-access those memories, we may find them to be corrupted in some way.”

His work is more than just visual; Szauder provides text to go along with the images. On his Behance profile, the artist expresses that the images recollect failed memories related to family moments. (via IGNANT)

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Clemens Behr

Jaw-dropping installations made from cardboard and tape, colorful and geometric paintings on discarded wood or subway car interiors, highly-patterned murals on the streets – Clemens Behr creates a little bit of everything. Or, rather, the Berlin-based artist makes A LOT of everything, much to the delight of his followers. Full disclosure: Yes, I am one such enthusiast.   Read More >


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Christian Engelmann

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This is a picture of a picture projected onto the scene that the picture was taken of. Duh. Needless to say, artist Christian Engelmann likes to mess with people. His art is often interactive and always maintains a sense of playfulness aimed at eliciting exaggerated double-takes. Engelmann tries to jolt people out of their every day state of being and remind us that the universe is full of surprises.

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